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Dissertation

Building an institution with emotional labour: Analysis of a post-industrial art centre, beyond the creative industries

30 Dec 2016-
TL;DR: A survey of Carriageworks can be found in this paper, where the authors discuss the effect of spatial privatisation and post-industrial charisma on artists' ability to perform emotional labour.
Abstract: ....................................................................................................................................... ii Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................. iii Table of contents ....................................................................................................................... iv List of figures ................................................................................................................................................ v Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 Chapter 1: Methodology and literature review ............................................................. 5 Methodology ............................................................................................................................................ 6 Between gentrification and a hard place .................................................................................. 11 Working with emotional labour ................................................................................................... 17 Notes on method and discipline ................................................................................................... 23 Chapter 2: Background on railway past and Redfern .............................................. 27 Romancing the railway .................................................................................................................... 32 Modern-day sacred land .................................................................................................................. 40 Chapter 3: Early years at Carriageworks ...................................................................... 57 A State Premier and a French theatre director take a helicopter ride ........................ 57 A Rolls Royce model stalls .............................................................................................................. 62 Managerialism versus artists’ furphy ........................................................................................ 67 A tale of two directors ...................................................................................................................... 76 Chapter 4: Carriageworks now; major Sydney institution ..................................... 80 The affect of spatial privatisation ................................................................................................ 85 Post-industrial charisma ................................................................................................................. 92 Performing authenticity ............................................................................................................... 105 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................. 116 Notes ........................................................................................................................................ 120 Bibliography ............................................................................................................................... vi Appendix ............................................................................................................................... xxviii
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Creative City as discussed by the authors is a classic and has been republished many times, aiming to make readers feel: "I can do that too" and to spread confidence that creative and innovative solutions to urban problems are feasible however bad they may seem at first sight.
Abstract: The Creative City is now a classic and has been republished many times. It is an ambitious book and a clarion call for imaginative action in running urban life. It seeks to inspire people to think, plan and act imaginatively in the city and to get an ideas factory going that turns urban innovations into reality. Its aim is to make readers feel: ‘I can do that too’ and to spread confidence that creative and innovative solutions to urban problems are feasible however bad they may seem at first sight.

870 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The aramis or the love of technology is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the book collection an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you for reading aramis or the love of technology. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look numerous times for their chosen books like this aramis or the love of technology, but end up in harmful downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some infectious bugs inside their computer. aramis or the love of technology is available in our book collection an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our books collection spans in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Kindly say, the aramis or the love of technology is universally compatible with any devices to read.

393 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
20 Jun 1978-Telos
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present La Volonté de Savoir, the methodological introduction of a projected five-volume history of sexuality, which seems to have a special fascination for Foucault: the gradual emergence of medicine as an institution, the birth of political economy, demography and linguistics as human sciences, the invention of incarceration and confinement for the control of the "other" in society (the mad, the libertine, the criminal) and that special violence that lurks beneath the power to control discourse.
Abstract: This writer who has warned us of the “ideological” function of both the oeuvre and the author as unquestioned forms of discursive organization has gone quite far in constituting for both these “fictitious unities” the name (with all the problems of such a designation) Michel Foucault. One text under review, La Volonté de Savoir, is the methodological introduction of a projected five-volume history of sexuality. It will apparently circle back over that material which seems to have a special fascination for Foucault: the gradual emergence of medicine as an institution, the birth of political economy, demography and linguistics as “human sciences,” the invention of incarceration and confinement for the control of the “other” in society (the mad, the libertine, the criminal) and that special violence that lurks beneath the power to control discourse.

15,794 citations

Book
01 Jan 1961
TL;DR: The conditions for city diversity, the generators of diversity, and the need for mixed primary uses are discussed in this paper, with a focus on the use of small blocks for small blocks.
Abstract: 1 Introduction Part One: The Peculiar Nature of Cities 2 The uses of sidewalks: safety 3 The uses of sidewalks: contact 4 The uses of sidewalks: assimilating children 5 The uses of neighbourhood parks 6 The uses of city neighbourhoods. Part Two: The Conditions for City Diversity 7 The generators of diversity 8 The need for mixed primary uses 9 The need for small blocks 10 The need for aged buildings 11 The need for concentration 12 Some myths about diversity. Part Three: Forces of Decline and Regeneration 13 The self-destruction of diversity 14 The curse of border vacuums 15 Unslumming and slumming 16 Gradual money and cataclysmic money. Part Four: Different Tactics 17 Subsidizing dwellings 18 Erosion of cities or attrition of automobiles 19 Visual order: its limitations and possibilities 20 Salvaging projects 21 Governing and planning districts 22 The kind of problem a city is Index.

11,879 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

8,455 citations


"Building an institution with emotio..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The role of the state is to create and preserve an institutional framework appropriate to such practices (Harvey, 2005)....

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Book
01 Mar 2004
TL;DR: The Rise of the Creative Class as mentioned in this paper describes a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant, with the result that our values and tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing.
Abstract: The national bestseller that defines a new economic class and shows how it is key to the future of our cities. The Washington Monthly 2002 Annual Political Book Award WinnerThe Rise of the Creative Class gives us a provocative new way to think about why we live as we do today-and where we might be headed. Weaving storytelling with masses of new and updated research, Richard Florida traces the fundamental theme that runs through a host of seemingly unrelated changes in American society: the growing role of creativity in our economy. Just as William Whyte's 1956 classic The Organization Man showed how the organizational ethos of that age permeated every aspect of life, Florida describes a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant. Millions of us are beginning to work and live much as creative types like artists and scientists always have-with the result that our values and tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing. Leading the shift are the nearly 38 million Americans in many diverse fields who create for a living-the Creative Class. The Rise of the Creative Class chronicles the ongoing sea of change in people's choices and attitudes, and shows not only what's happening but also how it stems from a fundamental economic change. The Creative Class now comprises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. Their choices have already had a huge economic impact. In the future they will determine how the workplace is organized, what companies will prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities will thrive or wither.

7,252 citations


"Building an institution with emotio..." refers background in this paper

  • ...I argue that rather than assessing such places as having successfully supplanted the economic deficit left behind by the decline of mass-industrial production with cultural industries (Landry, 2000; Florida, 2002), or denouncing them for doing so and thus contributing to urban displacement via gentrification (Lees, Slater and Wyly, 2013; Ley, 2003; Peck, 2005), by tracing the emotional labour of the key actors involved in the establishment and maintenance of these places, we can gain insight into their process of formation, as well as institutional entrenchment....

    [...]

  • ...…having successfully supplanted the economic deficit left behind by the decline of mass-industrial production with cultural industries (Landry, 2000; Florida, 2002), or denouncing them for doing so and thus contributing to urban displacement via gentrification (Lees, Slater and Wyly, 2013; Ley,…...

    [...]

  • ...126 The artist-led transformation of ideas about spaces frequently appears in cities with sizeable artistic communities, related creative industries and the type of populace that drives and serves these audiences — Richard Florida’s ‘creative class’ (Florida, 2002) — cropping up in cities as geographically distant as Montreal, Amsterdam and New York, where post-industrial spaces form homes, studios, offices, restaurants, galleries and more....

    [...]