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Journal ArticleDOI

Bustan Al‐Salatin, ‘the garden of kings’: a universal history and ADAB work from seventeenth‐century ACEH1

01 Mar 2004-Indonesia and The Malay World (Taylor and Francis Ltd)-Vol. 32, Iss: 92, pp 21-52
TL;DR: From a theological point of view, history is the manifestation of a Divine Plan as discussed by the authors, which is the absolute Creator who knows everything about His creatures in the past, the present and the future.
Abstract: From a theological point of view, history is the manifestation of a Divine Plan.2 God is the absolute Creator who knows everything about His creatures in the past, the present and the future. The D...
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Book
21 Feb 2013
TL;DR: A historical development of Islamic philanthropy from the time of the Islamic monarchs, through the period of Dutch colonialism and up to contemporary Indonesia can be found in the book.
Abstract: Faith and the State offers a historical development of Islamic philanthropy from the time of the Islamic monarchs, through the period of Dutch colonialism and up to contemporary Indonesia.

58 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Feb 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine women's role in maintaining their household livelihoods during violent political conflict, and cover the following issues: How do women survivors of violent political conflicts maintain their households livelihoods? What were the choices they made and the strategies they adopted? What resources did they have at their disposal?
Abstract: This thesis examines Acehnese women's role in maintaining their household livelihoods during violent political conflict, and covers the following issues: How do women survivors of violent political conflict maintain their household livelihoods? What were the choices they made and the strategies they adopted?, What resources did they have at their disposal?. This study is based on field work conducted in the period of July 2003 to August 2004, during which time the region was initially under Martial Law and later began the transition to a Civil Emergency periods. I maintain two main arguments in this thesis. First, Acehnese women were caught in the intersection between the longstanding violent political conflict and their household livelihoods. Second, in such a situation, they became active survivors and the backbones of their household livelihoods coping strategies. The second argument challenges scholarly works on women and conflict that tend to view women as either passive victims or active combatants. This argument' s theoretical framework is developed from the existing relevant theories in three main conceptual areas of women, coping strategies, and household livelihood sustenance, which are placed in the particular context of violent political conflict. Considering the conflict to be a multi faceted phenomenon, this thesis employs a mixture of economic, anthropological, sociological, and historical approaches. To date, there have been limited studies, on violent political conflict in Aceh which focus on how the people, especially women, survive in terms of their day to day living. The neglect of women and their livelihood issues in studies on the region actually parallels with the neglect of this issue in Conflict Studies in general, as noted by some scholarly works (Moser and Clark, 2001 ; Berger 2001 ; and Sharoni 1995). This study offers different perspective on the way women cope with the effects of the conflict on their daily lives and households livelihood.

8 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: The authors provided a thorough and accessible guide to belief about the afterlife in the Sunni Muslim tradition, drawing on the Qur'an, traditions, creeds, and theological commentaries, as well as interviews with Muslim clerics.
Abstract: This book provides a thorough and accessible guide to belief about the afterlife in the Sunni Muslim tradition. Drawing on the Qur'an, traditions, creeds, and theological commentaries, as well as interviews with Muslim clerics, the authors offer an overview of the Islamic eschatological narrative, describing the understanding of events beginning with the death of the individual and ending with habitation in the final abodes of recompense.

158 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: In this paper, a survey of the history of Arabic-Islamic thought and writing across a span of eight hundred years is presented, where the author combines a chronological and a topical approach to place the tradition within its wider intellectual context, while quotations from historians across the period introduce the English-speaking reader to some of the principal texts of Islamic culture.
Abstract: Thinking and writing about the past has always been of critical importance to the way that any culture or civilization views itself and its role in the world. In a work which surveys an entire tradition of historical thought and writing across a span of eight hundred years, Tarif Khalidi examines how Arabic-Islamic culture of the pre-modern period viewed the past, how it recorded it, and how it sought to answer the many complex questions associated with the discipline of history. The author combines a chronological and a topical approach to place the tradition within its wider intellectual context, while quotations from historians across the period introduce the English-speaking reader to some of the principal texts of Arabic-Islamic culture.

135 citations


"Bustan Al‐Salatin, ‘the garden of k..." refers background in this paper

  • ...’ Another example may be seen in Khalidi (1975: 60), in his discussion on Mas’udi’s account of the Creation of the world: ‘It is in his treatment of prophets and prophecy that Mas’udi illustrates most clearly God’s activity in history, that is, what was referred to above as the Divine plan.’ A discussion of history in the Biblical tradition may be read in Rosenthal (1962). In short, the term Divine Plan used in this study specifically refers to God’s Plan in history as described above....

    [...]

  • ...Nevertheless, brief discussion of the characteristics of universal history may be read in Khalidi (1994), Waldman (1980), Lichtenstadter (1974), Faruqi (1979) and Rosenthal (1962)....

    [...]

  • ...’ Another example may be seen in Khalidi (1975: 60), in his discussion on Mas’udi’s account of the Creation of the world: ‘It is in his treatment of prophets and prophecy that Mas’udi illustrates most clearly God’s activity in history, that is, what was referred to above as the Divine plan.’ A discussion of history in the Biblical tradition may be read in Rosenthal (1962). In short, the term Divine Plan used in this study specifically refers to God’s Plan in history as described above. Further examination of this term would go beyond the purposes of this study. 3. Further discussion of time and space in God’s plan of history may be read in Smith and Haddad (1981: 4-6). 4. A serious study of the concept of Islamic universal history, at Ph.D. level for instance, and especially written in English, may have been carried out somewhere but no such works have yet been published. Nevertheless, brief discussion of the characteristics of universal history may be read in Khalidi (1994), Waldman (1980), Lichtenstadter (1974), Faruqi (1979) and Rosenthal (1962)....

    [...]

Book
01 Dec 1961

119 citations

Book
01 Jan 1953
TL;DR: 1. Qurʾānic literature.2.
Abstract: 1.2. Qurʾānic literature. History and biography. Pt. 2: Biography, additions and corrections, indexes

101 citations


"Bustan Al‐Salatin, ‘the garden of k..." refers background in this paper

  • ...For the history of Persian historiography, see Browne (1915), Nariman (1918) and Storey (1935)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The acceptance by the Muslim community and Muslim thinkers of certain underlying metaphysical assumptions militated against, if it did not prevent, the evolution of a systematic and practical political doctrine; and profoundly affected their writing in many spheres.
Abstract: The unquestioning acceptance by the Muslim community and Muslim thinkers of certain underlying metaphysical assumptions militated against, if it did not prevent, the evolution of a systematic and practical political doctrine; and profoundly affected their writing in many spheres. The historian tended to view history as important so far as it "proved" Islam and acted as a warning to those who rejected or failed to fulfil its demands; the biographer regarded as significant those aspects of character and life which helped to build up the Muslim community; and the political theorist tended to consider important what preserved and explained the beliefs and actions prescribed by the revealed law, and what combatted error and prevented heresy. The fact, moreover, that the life of the Muslim community was based on certain unquestioned assumptions leads, so far at least as Persian political writings are concerned, to a certain difficulty of interpretation. On the one hand, the orthodox often did not feel it necessary to state what was known and accepted by all; on the other hand, the influence of the 'ulamd discouraged the open expression of unorthodox opinions; and the insecurity deriving from the arbitrary and irresponsible nature of political power made downright condemnation of existing practices and theories unwise. Consequently thel expositions of both orthodox and unorthodox do not always state the full case. The works which discuss political theory fall into four main categories: juristic works, administrative handbooks, mirrors

74 citations