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Journal ArticleDOI

Catalogue of family-group names in Cerambycidae (Coleoptera)

22 Dec 2009-Zootaxa (Magnolia Press)-Vol. 2321, Iss: 1, pp 1-80

TL;DR: Family-group names proposed for beetles belonging to the family Cerambycidae are catalogued and their availability is determined using the rules of the current International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.
Abstract: Family-group names proposed for beetles belonging to the family Cerambycidae are catalogued and their availability is determined using the rules of the current International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. A synoptic classification of the family summarizes the validity of the names. Type genera of all family-group names are listed and the type species and stems of genera of available family-group names are included. A new family-group name, Elytracanthinini Bousquet (type genus: Elytracanthina Monn, 2005, a replacement name for Elytracantha Lane, 1955) is proposed for Elytracanthinae Lane, 1955. Ichthyosoma armatum Montrouzier, 1855 is designated as type species of Icthyosoma Boisduval, 1835. Reversal of precedence is used to preserve the validity of the following family-group names: Anaglyptides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Anaglyptisidae Gistel, 1848 [Buprestidae]); Dryobiini Arnett, 1962 (over Dryobiadae Gistel, 1856 [Ptinidae]); Hemilophitae Thomson, 1868 (over Amphionychitae Thomson, 1860) and Heteropsides Lacordaire, 1869 (over Dichophyiaeidae Gistel, 1848). The following family-group names, although junior synonyms, are preserved as valid until an application is submitted to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature; in these cases a reversal of precedence could not be applied: Eurypodini Gahan, 1906 (over Zaracinae Pascoe, 1869); Macronides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Enchapteritae Thomson, 1861); Pyresthides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Pseudolepturitae Thomson, 1861 and Erythrinae Pascoe, 1866) and Stenoderinae Pascoe, 1867 (over Syllitae Thomson, 1864). A total of 238 valid cerambycid family-group names (413 available names) are recognized in the following 13 subfamilies: Vesperinae (1 valid family-group name), Oxypeltinae (1), Disteniinae (4), Anoplodermatinae (3), Philinae (1), Parandrinae (2), Prioninae (24), Spondylidinae (5), Necydalinae (1), Lepturinae (8), Lamiinae (80), Dorcasominae (1), and Cerambycinae (107).
Topics: Nomenclature (58%), International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (55%), Type species (54%), Type genus (53%), Cerambycinae (51%)

Summary (3 min read)

Introduction

  • Along with species- and genus-group names, family-group names form an integral part of zoological nomenclature.
  • The specific objectives of this paper are first to provide a complete list of family-group names proposed in the family Cerambycidae (as far as known to us) and second to assess the availability of all names using rules of the Code of Zoological Nomenclature consistently.
  • A family-group name proposed prior to 1931 needs only to be a scientific name (e.g., with a Latin termination) in the nominative plural formed from the stem of an available genus-group name used as valid in the new family-group taxon.
  • Because only the year is known for both Thomson’s and Fairmaire’s contributions, they must be considered as published the last day of the year (Article 21.3.2).
  • Thomson, 1861 PARANDRINI.
  • Blanchard, 1845 PRIONINAE Latreille, 1802 ACANTHOPHORINI.

Family Cerambycidae Latreille, 1802

  • Cerambyx Linnaeus, 1758 [stem = Cerambyc], also known as Type genus.
  • Type species: Cerambyx cerdo Linnaeus, 1758 designated by Latreille (1810: 431).
  • 375, 392, 395) used Ceratambycidae for Cerambycidae based on the incorrect subsequent spelling of the type genus Ceratambyx Linnaeus (instead of Cerambyx Linnaeus), also known as Gistel (1856.
  • Subfamily Vesperinae Mulsant, 1839 Vespéraires Mulsant, 1839: 214.
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Vesperini Mulsant, 1839 (Villiers 1978: 67).

Subfamily Oxypeltinae Lacordaire, 1868

  • 403 (key), 461, also known as Oxypeltides Lacordaire, 1868.
  • Oxypeltus Blanchard, 1851 [stem = Oxypelt-], also known as Type genus.
  • Oxypeltus quadrispinosus Blanchard, 1851 by monotypy, also known as Type species.
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Oxypeltinae Lacord[aire], 1869 (Aurivillius 1912: 254).
  • Zootaxa 2321 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 13FAMILY-GROUP NAMES IN CERAMBYCIDAE.

Subfamily Disteniinae Thomson, 1861

  • 134 (key), 181, 182 (key) [incorrect original stem], also known as Distenitae Thomson, 1861.
  • Distenia columbina Lepeletier and Audinet-Serville, 1828 by monotypy, also known as Type species.
  • This name is unavailable under Article 11.7.2 (not subsequently latinized and attributed to Blanchard 1845).
  • Tribe Dynamostini Lacordaire, 1868 Dynamostides Lacordaire, 1868: 194 (key), 196.
  • Dynamostes audax Pascoe, 1857 by monotypy, also known as Type species.

Subfamily Anoplodermatinae Guérin-Méneville, 1840

  • 276 [incorrect original stem], also known as Anoplodermiens Guérin-Méneville, 1840.
  • Anoploderma Guérin-Méneville, 1840 [stem = Anoplodermat-], also known as Type genus.
  • Tribe Anoplodermatini Guérin-Méneville, 1840 Anoplodermiens Guérin-Méneville, 1840: 276 [incorrect original stem].
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Anoplodermatini Guérin-Méneville, 1840 (Monné 1994c: 9). Cherrocriinae Prosen, 1960: 90.
  • Hypocephalus Desmarest, 1832 [stem = Hypocephal-], also known as Type genus.

Subfamily Philinae Thomson, 1861

  • Philus Saunders, 1853 [stem = Phil-], also known as Type genus.
  • Philus inconspicuus Saunders, 1853 by monotypy, also known as Type species.

Subfamily Parandrinae Blanchard, 1845

  • Parandra Latreille, 1802 [stem = Parandr-], also known as Type genus.
  • Attelabus glaber DeGeer, 1774 by monotypy, also known as Type species.
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Parandrae Blanchard, 1845 (Lameere 1913: 4).
  • 160) established the genus earlier as “Gen. Parandre; parandre” followed by a description, also known as Latreille (1802.
  • Tribe Erichsoniini Thomson, 1861 Erichsonitae Thomson, 1861: 140 (key), 271 (key), 274 [incorrect original stem].

Subfamily Prioninae Latreille, 1802

  • Prionus Geoffroy, 1762 [stem = Prion-], also known as Type genus.
  • 62 (based on Catypnes Pascoe, 1864), also known as Catypnides Lacordaire, 1868.
  • This name is unavailable under Article 11.7.2 (not subsequently latinized and attributed to Lacordaire 1868 [1869]).
  • Anacolus Berthold, 1827 [stem = Anacol-], also known as Type genus.
  • Type species: Prionus exsertus Olivier, 1795 designated by Desmarest (1860: 307).

Subfamily Spondylidinae Audinet-Serville, 1832

  • 123 [incorrect original stem], also known as Spondylii Audinet-Serville, 1832.
  • Tribe Anisarthrini Mamaev and Danilevsky, 1973 Anisarthrites Fairmaire, 1864: 124 (based on Anisarthron Dejean, 1835).
  • This name is unavailable under Article 11.7.2 (not subsequently latinized and attributed to Fairmaire 1864).
  • Atimia Haldeman, 1847 [stem = Atimi- ], also known as Type genus.
  • Michthisoma heterodoxus LeConte, 1850 by monotypy, also known as Type species.

Subfamily Necydalinae Latreille, 1825

  • Necydalis Linnaeus, 1758 [stem = Necydal-], also known as Type genus.
  • Type species: Necydalis major Linnaeus, 1758 designated by Latreille (1829: 120).

Subfamily Lepturinae Latreille, 1802

  • Leptura Linnaeus, 1758 [stem = Leptur-], also known as Type genus.
  • Type species: Leptura quadrifasciata Linnaeus, 1758 designated by Westwood (1838: 41).
  • Stenocorus cyaneus Fabricius, 1775 by monotypy, also known as Type species.
  • This name is unavailable under Article 11.7.2 (not subsequently latinized and attributed to Mulsant 1863).
  • Tribe Rhamnusiini Sama, 2009 Enoploderini Danilevsky [in Althoff and Danilevsky], 1997: 9 (based on Enoploderes Faldermann, 1837).

Subfamily Lamiinae Latreille, 1825

  • Lamia Fabricius, 1775 [stem = Lami-], also known as Type genus.
  • Tribe Homonoeini Thomson, 1864 Homonaeitae Thomson, 1864: 35.
  • Hypselomus cristatus Perty, 1832 by monotypy, also known as Type species.
  • This name is unavailable Article 11.7.2 (not subsequently latinized, attributed to Lacordaire 1869, and considered valid).
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Rhodopini Lacordaire, 1872 (Aurivillius 1922a: 210).

Subfamily Dorcasominae Lacordaire, 1868

  • 403 (key), 456, also known as Dorcasomides Lacordaire, 1868.
  • Apatophysis toxotoides Chevrolat, 1860 by monotypy, also known as Type species.
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Apatophyseinae Lacordaire, 1869 (Danilevsky 1979: 827).
  • This synonymy was published by Özdikmen (2008: 713) based on information previously provided by Mikhail L. Danilevsky on-line.
  • Zootaxa 2321 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 41FAMILY-GROUP NAMES IN CERAMBYCIDAE.

Subfamily Cerambycinae Latreille, 1802

  • Cerambyx Linnaeus, 1758 [stem = Cerambyc- ], also known as Type genus.
  • This family-group name is permanently invalid because it is based on preoccupied type genus (Article 39).
  • Tribe Macronini Lacordaire, 1868 Enchapteritae Thomson, 1861: 132 (key), 143 (key), 151.
  • Availability (under Article 11.7.2): Psebiini Lacord[aire], 1869 (Aurivillius 1912: 261).
  • Stenhomalus White, 1855 [stem = Stenhomal-], also known as Type genus.

Acknowledgments

  • The authors thank Anthony Davies, Andrew Smith, Karl Adlbauer, and Miguel A. Alonso-Zarazaga for reviewing a first draft of this paper and providing valuable comments.
  • Miguel corrected many stems of generic names that the authors would otherwise have incorrectly cited.
  • The authors also acknowledge the cooperation of Robert Vigneault who repeatedly checked some issues in books not available to us.

Index

  • Family-group names accepted as valid in this work are listed in uppercase letters.
  • Original spellings of familygroup names are in lowercase letters.

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Accepted by Q. Wang: 2 Dec. 2009; published: 22 Dec. 2009
ZOOTAXA
ISSN 1175-5326 (print edition)
ISSN
1175-5334 (online edition)
Copyright © 2009 · Magnolia Press
Zootaxa 2321: 180 (2009)
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Monograph
ZOOTAXA
Catalogue of family-group names in Cerambycidae
(Coleoptera)
YVES BOUSQUET
1
, DANIEL J. HEFFERN
2
, PATRICE BOUCHARD
1
&
EUGENIO H. NEARNS
3
1
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C6.
E-mail: yves.bousquet@agr.gc.ca; patrice.bouchard@agr.gc.ca
2
10531 Goldfield Lane, Houston, TX 77064, USA. E-mail: titanusgiganteus@hotmail.com
3
Department of Biology, Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico,
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. E-mail: gnearns@unm.edu
Corresponding author: patrice.bouchard@agr.gc.ca
Magnolia Press
Auckland, New Zealand
2321

BOUSQUET ET AL.
2 · Zootaxa 2321 © 2009
Magnolia Press
Yves Bousquet, Daniel J. Heffern, Patrice Bouchard & Eugenio H. Nearns
CATALOGUE OF FAMILY-GROUP NAMES IN CERAMBYCIDAE (COLEOPTERA)
(Zootaxa 2321)
80 pp.; 30 cm.
22 Dec. 2009
ISBN 978-1-86977-449-3 (paperback)
ISBN 978-1-86977-450-9 (Online edition)
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IRST PUBLISHED IN 2009 BY
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ISSN 1175-5326 (Print edition)
ISSN 1175-5334 (Online edition)

Zootaxa 2321 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 3
FAMILY-GROUP NAMES IN CERAMBYCIDAE
Table of contents
Abstract ...............................................................................................................................................................................3
Introduction .........................................................................................................................................................................4
Synoptic classification of the world Cerambycidae ............................................................................................................7
Catalogue of Taxa ..............................................................................................................................................................12
Acknowledgments .............................................................................................................................................................58
References......................................................................................................................................................................... 59
Appendix ...........................................................................................................................................................................72
Index.................................................................................................................................................................................. 73
Abstract
Family-group names proposed for beetles belonging to the family Cerambycidae are catalogued and their availability is
determined using the rules of the current International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. A synoptic classification of the
family summarizes the validity of the names. Type genera of all family-group names are listed and the type species and
stems of genera of available family-group names are included. A new family-group name, Elytracanthinini Bousquet
(type genus: Elytracanthina Monn, 2005, a replacement name for Elytracantha Lane, 1955) is proposed for
Elytracanthinae Lane, 1955. Ichthyosoma armatum Montrouzier, 1855 is designated as type species of Icthyosoma
Boisduval, 1835. Reversal of precedence is used to preserve the validity of the following family-group names:
Anaglyptides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Anaglyptisidae Gistel, 1848 [Buprestidae]); Dryobiini Arnett, 1962 (over
Dryobiadae Gistel, 1856 [Ptinidae]); Hemilophitae Thomson, 1868 (over Amphionychitae Thomson, 1860) and
Hétéropsides Lacordaire, 1869 (over Dichophyiaeidae Gistel, 1848). The following family-group names, although junior
synonyms, are preserved as valid until an application is submitted to the International Commission on Zoological
Nomenclature; in these cases a reversal of precedence could not be applied: Eurypodini Gahan, 1906 (over Zaracinae
Pascoe, 1869); Macronides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Enchapteritae Thomson, 1861); Pyresthides Lacordaire, 1868 (over
Pseudolepturitae Thomson, 1861 and Erythrinae Pascoe, 1866) and Stenoderinae Pascoe, 1867 (over Syllitae Thomson,
1864). A total of 238 valid cerambycid family-group names (413 available names) are recognized in the following 13
subfamilies: Vesperinae (1 valid family-group name), Oxypeltinae (1), Disteniinae (4), Anoplodermatinae (3), Philinae
(1), Parandrinae (2), Prioninae (24), Spondylidinae (5), Necydalinae (1), Lepturinae (8), Lamiinae (80), Dorcasominae
(1), and Cerambycinae (107).
Key words: longhorned beetles; nomenclature; classification; type genera; type species; stem

BOUSQUET ET AL.
4 · Zootaxa 2321 © 2009
Magnolia Press
Introduction
Along with species- and genus-group names, family-group names form an integral part of zoological
nomenclature. Valid family-group names, which include names from subtribe to superfamily ranks, are used
in all classifications. Detailed studies on the availability and validity of these names have increased recently
since it has become apparent that accurate application of the rules of nomenclature is necessary to promote
long-term stability above the rank of genus.
Usage of the numerous family-group names proposed in the charismatic and well-studied family
Cerambycidae, the longhorned beetles, has not always been in accordance with the International Code of
Zoological Nomenclature (hereby the Code) effective at the time. It has become evident that a catalogue of all
family-group names proposed within the family Cerambycidae was necessary to promote stability in the
nomenclature of the group.
The results presented here, as well as any subsequent corrections or modifications pointed out to us, will
be incorporated in an upcoming review of all family-group names proposed in the order Coleoptera to date.
This review will be co-authored by several coleopterists, including YB and PB.
The specific objectives of this paper are first to provide a complete list of family-group names proposed in
the family Cerambycidae (as far as known to us) and second to assess the availability of all names using rules
of the Code of Zoological Nomenclature consistently. We have tried to make as few changes as possible to
concepts currently accepted by workers in this family. Articles cited in the text refer to those in the current
Code (ICZN 1999).
Availability of family-group names
Based on the Code, requirements for availability of family-group names are relatively simple to interpret.
A family-group name proposed prior to 1931 needs only to be a scientific name (e.g., with a Latin
termination) in the nominative plural formed from the stem of an available genus-group name used as valid in
the new family-group taxon. The name had to denote a suprageneric taxon and not be a plural noun or
adjective referring to the members of a genus (see Articles 11, 12).
Between 1931 and 1999, new family-group names had to be accompanied by a description in words or by
a bibliographic reference to such a published statement, in addition to the requisites already in effect before, to
be available (Articles 13, 15). However, there are two cases when a family-group name proposed between
1931 and 1999 could be available even without a description or indication. Firstly, when the new name
proposed is a replacement name (Article 13.1.3). Secondly, when a family-group name, proposed before 1961
without description or bibliographic reference to such a description, was used as valid prior to 2000 and was
not rejected, between 1961 and 1999, by an author on the ground that the name was not accompanied by a
description or bibliographic reference to such a description (Article 13.2.1). A bibliographic reference is a
citation to a publication (Code’s glossary on p. 115). Simply referring to an author (with or without indicating
a publication date) without actually giving the bibliographic reference, either as a footnote or in a “references”
section, do not make the name available. In our opinion, the reference should include minimally, beside the
authors name(s), the date and an abbreviated title of the book or of the journal.
In addition to the requisites mentioned above, any new family-group names proposed after 1999 must be
explicitly indicated as intentionally new and the name of the type genus has to be clearly cited, in order to be
available (Articles 16.1, 16.2).
One of the most difficult tasks while working on this review was to decide on the most consistent and
objective way to apply Article 11.7.2, which deals with the availability of names that were originally proposed
in a vernacular form. Vernacular names are generally not treated as scientific names in zoological
nomenclature (see Recommendation 11A). However, the International Commission on Zoological
Nomenclature has made a single, but rather restricted, exception that applies to family-group names.
According to Article 11.7.2, a family-group name published before 1900 in a vernacular form could be
available from its first publication only “if [1] it has been latinized by later authors and [2] generally has been

Zootaxa 2321 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 5
FAMILY-GROUP NAMES IN CERAMBYCIDAE
generally accepted as valid by authors interested in the group concerned and [3] as dating from that first
publication in vernacular form”. We interpreted the conditions listed in Article 11.7.2 as three separate
conditions that needed to be fulfilled (as indicated in square brackets we added) in order for a vernacular name
to be considered available. Many recent authors have treated family-group names first proposed in vernacular
form as available if they were latinized by later authors but we do not believe that this practice is in line with
the requirements of the Code. We have accepted as available all vernacular names published before 1900 that
have subsequently been used in latinized form, while being used as valid, and credited to the publication in
their vernacular form. To some extent we have tried to find the first publication that would explicitly fulfill
these requirements although we believe it is not indispensable. For every vernacular name that meet the
requirement of availability, we have added a comment in the format of the following example “Availability
(under Article 11.7.2): Bumetopini Lacordaire, 1872 (Aurivillius 1922a: 231).”
We have interpreted names proposed in the following languages to be vernacular: all German names with
the suffix “–en”, all Spanish names with the suffix “–os” or “–as” and all French names with the suffix “–
iens”. The most important issue was to determine the correct status of names originally proposed with the
suffix “–es.” We have used the principle that all family-group names proposed by non-French writers with the
suffix “–es” were in fact laninized names with an ending that differs from those regulated by the Commission
(these are mostly older names proposed before rules of zoological nomenclature became well-established).
For each name with the suffix “–es” first proposed by French workers (e.g. Latreille, Lacordaire, Lameere) we
went through the entire work containing those names and established if the author consistently used either
vernacular or latinized names in their work. French vernacular names often have accents in them (“é” or “è”)
while latinized names do not. We have found that determining whether an author used vernacular or latinized
names in a particular work was fairly straightforward except for one exception. Lameere (1912) used
vernacular names that he had previously introduced in previous parts of his series “Révision des prionides” in
the first pages of his article but used several family-group names as groups below the rank of tribe towards the
end of his paper. Some of these names had the suffix “–es” (e.g. Cnemoplites, Megopides, Hoploderes) and
were at the same rank as other names used in a latinized form (e.g. Archetypi, Macrotomae, Eurypodae).
Because none of the family-group names proposed below the rank of tribe had accents (some of which would
be required if these names were vernacular) and because of the context of the last part of Lameere’s article, we
have treated “Megopides” as originally proposed in a latinized form but with a suffix that differs from those
regulated by the Commission. Latreille proposed new family-group names with the suffix “–es” in several of
his works. We noticed that he most often used both the vernacular (listed first, with accents when required by
French language) and latinized (listed second, always in italics) forms of each name together in the same
heading. We have listed the latinized form of the name in each of those cases.
Bibliographic notes
As for specific and generic names, family-group names are subject to the “Principle of Priority” (see
Article 23). As mentioned above, relatively few requirements needed to be met in order for a new family-
group name proposed before 1931 to be considered available. They needed to be a scientific name formed
from the stem of an available generic name. This led to several cases where names were introduced in the
literature without even being recognized as new taxa. Sometimes the same family-group name was introduced
more than once during a single year and by different authors. This is the case for several cerambycid family-
group names proposed by Fairmaire, Pascoe, and Thomson in 1864 as well as by Lacordaire and Pascoe in the
years 1868 and 1869. We have attempted to determine precise dates of publication for these works because of
the importance of establishing priority for these names proposed in them.
Despite extensive search, we have been unable to find publication dates, other than the year, for
Thomson’s Systema cerambycidarum and Fairmaire’s Genera des coléoptères d’Europe, started by Jacquelin
du Val, both published in 1864. Pascoe’s paper published in the third volume of the third series of the
Transactions of the Entomological Society of London was published on October 3, 1864 (Wheeler 1912).
Because only the year is known for both Thomson’s and Fairmaire’s contributions, they must be considered as
published the last day of the year (Article 21.3.2). Consequently, Pascoe’s names published in 1864 have

Citations
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04 Apr 2011-ZooKeys
TL;DR: A catalogue of 4887 family-group names based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given, which recognizes as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes.
Abstract: We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant) based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. nov. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae), Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae), Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae), Phloeonomini Adam, 2001 syn. nov. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Sepedophilini Adam, 2001 syn. nov. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae); Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein) syn. nov. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae), Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae), Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species Ptilinus costatus Gyllenhal, 1827, designated herein) syn. nov. of Ptilinus Geoffroy, 1762 (Ptinidae), Paniscus Gistel, 1848 (type species Scarabaeus fasciatus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Trichius Fabricius, 1775 (Scarabaeidae), Phibalus Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela pubescens Linnaeus, 1758, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Omophlus Dejean, 1834 (Tenebrionidae). The following new replacement name is proposed: Gompeliina Bouchard, 2011 nom. nov. for Olotelina Baguena Corella, 1948 (Aderidae). Reversal of Precedence (Article 23.9) is used to conserve usage of the following names (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Perigonini Horn, 1881 nom. protectum over Trechicini Bates, 1873 nom. oblitum (Carabidae), Anisodactylina Lacordaire, 1854 nom. protectum over Eurytrichina LeConte, 1848 nom. oblitum (Carabidae), Smicronychini Seidlitz, 1891 nom. protectum over Desmorini LeConte, 1876 nom. oblitum (Curculionidae), Bagoinae Thomson, 1859 nom. protectum over Lyprinae Gistel 1848 nom. oblitum (Curculionidae), Aterpina Lacordaire, 1863 nom. protectum over Heliomenina Gistel, 1848 nom. oblitum (Curculionidae), Naupactini Gistel, 1848 nom. protectum over Iphiini Schonherr, 1823 nom. oblitum (Curculionidae), Cleonini Schonherr, 1826 nom. protectum over Geomorini Schonherr, 1823 nom. oblitum (Curculionidae), Magdalidini Pascoe, 1870 nom. protectum over Scardamyctini Gistel, 1848 nom. oblitum (Curculionidae), Agrypninae/-ini Candeze, 1857 nom. protecta over Adelocerinae/-ini Gistel, 1848 nom. oblita and Pangaurinae/-ini Gistel, 1856 nom. oblita (Elateridae), Prosternini Gistel, 1856 nom. protectum over Diacanthini Gistel, 1848 nom. oblitum (Elateridae), Calopodinae Costa, 1852 nom. protectum over Sparedrinae Gistel, 1848 nom. oblitum (Oedemeridae), Adesmiini Lacordaire, 1859 nom. protectum over Macropodini Agassiz, 1846 nom. oblitum (Tenebrionidae), Bolitophagini Kirby, 1837 nom. protectum over Eledonini Billberg, 1820 nom. oblitum (Tenebrionidae), Throscidae Laporte, 1840 nom. protectum over Stereolidae Rafinesque, 1815 nom. oblitum (Throscidae) and Lophocaterini Crowson, 1964 over Lycoptini Casey, 1890 nom. oblitum (Trogossitidae); Monotoma Herbst, 1799 nom. protectum over Monotoma Panzer, 1792 nom. oblitum (Monotomidae); Pediacus Shuckard, 1839 nom. protectum over Biophloeus Dejean, 1835 nom. oblitum (Cucujidae), Pachypus Dejean, 1821 nom. protectum over Pachypus Billberg, 1820 nom. oblitum (Scarabaeidae), Sparrmannia Laporte, 1840 nom. protectum over Leocaeta Dejean, 1833 nom. oblitum and Cephalotrichia Hope, 1837 nom. oblitum (Scarabaeidae).

805 citations


Cites background from "Catalogue of family-group names in ..."

  • ...We have found that determining whether an author used vernacular or latinized names in a particular work was fairly straightforward (Bousquet et al. 2009)....

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  • ...2005), Scarabaeoidea (Smith 2006) and Cerambycidae (Bousquet et al. 2009)....

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Dissertation
01 Jan 2016-

111 citations


Cites background from "Catalogue of family-group names in ..."

  • ...Pascoe’s work in 1868 was published in volume 9 of the Journal of the Linnean Society, Zoology (Bousquet et al., 2009)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The hypothesis that fuscumol and fuskumol acetate are widespread pheromone components or attractants for a variety of cerambycid species, especially lamiines in the tribe Acanthocinini is supported.
Abstract: (E)-6,10-dimethyl-5,9-undecadien-2-ol (fuscumol) is an important component of male-produced aggregation pheromones for several species of cerambycid beetles in the genus Tetropium (subfamily Aseminae ⁄ Spondylidinae). Here, we describe the experiments that tested the hypothesis that fuscumol and ⁄ or fuscumol acetate also are general attractants for species in the cerambycid subfamily Lamiinae. At field sites in northwestern Indiana and central Texas (USA), panel traps baited with fuscumol or its acetate captured 331 lamiine beetles, compared to 11 beetles captured in control traps. Three species were attracted to traps baited with fuscumol as a single component, whereas another four species were attracted to fuscumol acetate alone. Surprisingly, fuscumol acetate also attracted two species in the subfamily Cerambycinae: Xylotrechus colonus (Fabricius) (males of which produce a pheromone composed only of stereoisomers of 2,3-hexanediol and 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one), and Obrium maculatum (Olivier) (for which a pheromone has yet to be identified). In an independent field experiment in east-central Illinois (USA), traps baited with fuscumol and ⁄ or its acetate captured 136 beetles of eight lamiine species, all but one species of which were also captured in the other experiment. Blending fuscumol and its acetate did not inhibit responses of species to either of the individual compounds, but synergized their activity for one species. Our results support the hypothesis that fuscumol and fuscumol acetate are widespread pheromone components or attractants for a variety of cerambycid species, especially lamiines in the tribe Acanthocinini.

73 citations


Cites background from "Catalogue of family-group names in ..."

  • ...Although fuscumol is an aggregation pheromone for some species in the subfamily Aseminae ⁄ Spondylidinae, we did not trap any beetles of that subfamily in Texas, Indiana, or Illinois, even though one species of Tetropium and other asemine ⁄ spondylidine genera have been recorded from these regions (volumes indexed in Linsley & Chemsak, 1997)....

    [...]

  • ...(E)-6,10-dimethyl-5,9-undecadien-2-ol (fuscumol) has been identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone for the invasive European cerambycid Tetropium fuscum (Fabricius) and its North American congener Tetropium cinnamopterum (Kirby) (Silk et al., 2007)....

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  • ...Similarly, beetles of the genus Tetropium (subfamily Aseminae ⁄ Spondylidinae; Monné & Hovore, 2005; Bousquet et al., 2009) are only attracted to aggregation pheromones when odors of host plants are present (Silk et al., 2007)....

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  • ...However, the activity of fuscumol for species in this subfamily may be strongly synergized by volatile terpenoids produced by host plants (which were not included in our trap lures), as shown for Tetropium species (Silk et al., 2007; Sweeney et al., 2010)....

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  • ...Similarly, beetles of the genus Tetropium (subfamily Aseminae ⁄ Spondylidinae; Monné & Hovore, 2005; Bousquet et al., 2009) are only attracted to aggregation pheromones when odors of host plants are present (Silk et al....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The goal was to identify effective detection tools for a broad array of cerambycid species by testing some known ceram bycid attractants and a pheromone in different trap designs placed across a range of habitats.
Abstract: Wood-boring beetles in the family Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) play important roles in many forest ecosystems. However, increasing numbers of invasive cerambycid species are transported to new countries by global commerce and threaten forest health in the United States and worldwide. Our goal was to identify effective detection tools for a broad array of cerambycid species by testing some known cerambycid attractants and a pheromone in different trap designs placed across a range of habitats. We compared numbers and species richness of cerambycid beetles captured with crossvane panel traps and 12-unit Lindgren multiple-funnel traps, placed either at ground level (1.5 m high) or canopy level (≈3–10 m high), at eight sites classified as either residential, industrial, deciduous forest, or conifer forest. We captured 3,723 beetles representing 72 cerambycid species from 10 June to 15 July 2010. Species richness was highest for the subfamilies Cerambycinae and Lamiinae, which accounted for 33 and 46% of...

57 citations


References
More filters

01 Jan 1935-
TL;DR: The general character of “The Fauna of British India” is so well known, and has been so frequently commented on, that it is only necessary to say that the present half-volume is similar to those which have preceded it, and that the high character of the series is fully maintained.
Abstract: WE congratulate the editor and author on the appearance of another half-volume of this important work. The present instalment is devoted to the homopterous family Jassidæ, subfani. v. Jassinae (including Acocephalinae), comprising twelve divisions, and subfam. Typhlocybinas, with two divisions. The species included are numbered from 2509 to 2696. An appendix is commenced, including additions to the Rhynchota Heteroptera discussed in vol. i.; and the portion now published relates to the families Penta-tomidae, Coreidae, arid Berytidae, and the additional species are numbered from 2697 to 2768. The general character of “The Fauna of British India” is so well known, and has been so frequently commented on, that it is only necessary to say that the present half-volume is similar to those which have preceded it, and that the high character of the series is fully maintained.The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma.Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for India in Council. Edited by Lt.-Col. C. T. Bingham. Rhynchota. Vol. iv., part ii. Homoptera and Appendix (Part i.) By W. L. Distant. (London: Taylor and Francis, 1908.) Price 10s.

3,022 citations


"Catalogue of family-group names in ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The following family-group names, although junior synonyms, are preserved as valid until an application is submitted to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature; in these cases a reversal of precedence could not be applied: Eurypodini Gahan, 1906 (over Zaracinae Pascoe, 1869); Macronides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Enchapteritae Thomson, 1861); Pyresthides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Pseudolepturitae Thomson, 1861 and Erythrinae Pascoe, 1866) and Stenoderinae Pascoe, 1867 (over Syllitae Thomson, 1864)....

    [...]

  • ...…is submitted to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature; in these cases a reversal of precedence could not be applied: Eurypodini Gahan, 1906 (over Zaracinae Pascoe, 1869); Macronides Lacordaire, 1868 (over Enchapteritae Thomson, 1861); Pyresthides Lacordaire, 1868 (over…...

    [...]



Journal ArticleDOI
Miguel A. Monné1Institutions (1)
17 Apr 2005-Zootaxa
TL;DR: A catalogue of the subfamily Lamiinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of the Neotropical region is presented and the following new names are given.
Abstract: A catalogue of the subfamily Lamiinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of the Neotropical region is presented. The tribes (36), genera (723), species (4231) and subspecies (60) are listed in alphabetical order. Under each family-group name bibliographical references are given and under each species-group name, data on the type-locality, the acronym of the institution where the type is deposited, the geographical distribution and detailed bibliographical references are provided. Two new combinations are proposed: Urographis eucharis (Bates, 1885), new comb. and Urographis vexillaris (Bates, 1872) new comb., both from Graphisurus LeConte, 1852, not Kirby, 1837. The following new names are given: Alcathousiella new name to replace Alcathous Thomson, 1864, preoccupied by Alcathous Stal, 1863, Hemiptera; Camposiellina new name to replace Camposiella Lane, 1972, preoccupied by Camposiella Hebard, 1924, Orthoptera; Edechthistatus new name to replace Parechthistatus Giesbert, 2001, preoccupied by Parechthistatus Breuning, 1942, Coleoptera; Elytracanthina new name to replace Elytracantha Lane, 1955, preoccupied by Elytracantha Kleine, 1915, Coleoptera; Eranina new name to replace Erana Bates, 1866, preoccupied by Erana Gray, 1840, Aves; Heteresmia new name to replace Esmia Pascoe, 1859, preoccupied by Esmia Leach, 1847, Mollusca; Eupalessa new name to replace Eupales Dillon & Dillon, 1945, preoccupied by Eupales Lefevre, 1885, Coleoptera; Melzerus new name to replace Idiomerus Melzer, 1934, preoccupied by Idiomerus Imms, 1912, Collembola; Midamiella new name to replace Midamus Dillon & Dillon, 1945, preoccupied by Midamus Simon, 1881, Arachnida; Neoamphion new name to replace Amphion Reiche, 1840, preoccupied by Amphion Huebner, 1819, Lepidoptera; Neocolobura new name to replace Colobura Blanchard, 1851, preoccupied by Colobura Billberg, 1820, Lepidoptera; Neohoplonotus new name to replace Hoplonotus Blanchard, 1851, preoccupied by Hoplonotus Schmidt-Goebel, 1846, Coleoptera; Neohylus new name to replace Hylus Dillon & Dillon, 1945, preocuppied by Hylus Van Dyke, 1945, Coleoptera; Neolampedusa new name to replace Lampedusa Dillon & Dillon, 1945, preoccupied by Lampedusa Boettger, 1877, Mollusca; Proseriphus new name to replace Seriphus Bates, 1864, preoccupied by Seriphus Ayres, 1857, Pisces. One new synonym is proposed: Proxepectasis Monne & Giesbert, 1992 = Parepectasoides Breuning, 1979.

337 citations



Book
01 Feb 1985-
Abstract: Foreword Preface Introduction General Considerations Insect Classification and Systematics Identification Features Insect Ecology, Behavior, and Distribution Insect Collecting The Orders of Insects The Insect Fauna of America, North of Mexico Collembola (Springtails and Allies) Protura (Proturans) Diplura (Diplurans) Archaeognatha (Bristletails) Zygentoma (Silverfish and Allies) Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies) Plecoptera (Stoneflies) Embioptera (Webspinners) Phasmatodea (Walkingsticks) Orthoptera (Grasshoppers, Crickets, and Katydids) Grylloblattodea (Rock Crawlers) Dermaptera (Earwigs) Dictyoptera (Mantids and Cockroaches) Isoptera (Termites) Zoraptera (Angel Insects) Psocoptera (Booklice and Barklice ) Mallophaga(Chewing Lice) Anoplura(Sucking Lice) Hemiptera (True Bugs) Homoptera (Cicadas,Leafhoppers, Aphids, Scale Insects, and Allies) Thysanoptera (Thrips) Neuroptera (Dobsonflies, Lacewings, Antlions, and Allies) Coleoptera (Beetles, and Weevils) Hymenoptera (Wasps, Ants, and Bees) Trichoptera (Caddisflies) Lepidoptera (Moths, Butterflies, and Skippers) Mecoptera (Scorpionflies and their Allies Diptera (The Flies) Strepsiptera (Stylopids) Siphonaptera (Fleas) Glossary Index

273 citations