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Proceedings ArticleDOI

Circular dielectric resonator antenna of high dielectric constant for low-profile applications

04 Apr 1995-Vol. 1, pp 517-519
TL;DR: In this article, the broadside fundamental TM/sub 101/ mode of an aperture-coupled circular dielectric resonator (DR) antenna using a very high DCC was studied.
Abstract: The broadside fundamental TM/sub 101/ mode of an aperture-coupled circular dielectric resonator (DR) antenna using very high dielectric constant is studied. By using high dielectric constant, the DR antenna can be made low-profile with a relatively low resonant frequency. The return loss, radiation characteristics and antenna gain of the configuration are measured and discussed. >
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a historical review of the research carried out on dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) over the last three decades and highlight major research activities in each decade.
Abstract: This article presents a historical review of the research carried out on dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) over the last three decades. Major research activities in each decade are highlighted. The current state of the art of dielectric-resonator-antenna technology is then reviewed. The achievable performance of dielectric resonator antennas designed for compactness, wide impedance bandwidth, low profiles, circular polarization, or high gain are illustrated. The latest developments in dielectric-resonator-antenna arrays and fabrication techniques are also examined.

494 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated circular sector and annular sector dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) geometries and demonstrated that a sector DRA has 75% less volume than a conventional cylindrical DRA, with the same resonant frequency.
Abstract: We investigate circular sector and annular sector dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) geometries. The advantage these geometries offer, compared to conventional circular cylindrical DRAs are significant reductions in volume, making them potential candidates for use in compact applications such as mobile communication handsets. Approximate theory, simulation, and experimental results are provided to support the findings. In particular, a sector DRA is demonstrated to have 75% less volume than a conventional cylindrical DRA, with the same resonant frequency. The DRA volume minimization for compact antenna design is also discussed and a design is proposed and tested for a mobile telephone handset suitable for the DCS1800 system.

93 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used the loaded unit cell of the equivalent transmission line model to extract the slow wave enhancement factor, the ratio of the loaded to the unloaded propagation constants of the wave in the antennas.
Abstract: Miniaturization of slow wave antennas exploiting the slow wave enhancement factor is presented. The printed antennas are periodically loaded with shunt capacitors to slow down the guided wave in the structures. In this paper, the loaded unit cell of the equivalent transmission line model is utilized to extract the slow wave enhancement factor, the ratio of the loaded to the unloaded propagation constants of the wave in the antennas. From this model, the slow wave enhancement factor of a loaded antenna agrees very well with the miniaturization factor, and therefore load parameters in the circuit model can be readily obtained when a specific size reduction is attempted. This claim was substantiated by demonstrating two small radiators, a high-frequency (HF) slot-loop antenna and a planar inverted F antenna (PIFA), to achieve the desired size reductions. Experimental results show that both of the antennas demonstrate greater than ten-times size reduction from their unloaded counterparts at the expense of the degraded gains and impedance bandwidths. Specifically, the loaded slot loop presents the predicted gain and measured bandwidth on the order of -34.9 dBi and 0.38% for VSWR ≤ 2, respectively. Therefore, a matching network derived from filter design techniques is proposed to increase the antenna bandwidth so that a measured fractional bandwidth of 1.78% is achieved. The slot loop combined with the impedance matching circuit occupies a footprint size of 0.031λ0 × 0.017 λ0 at the operating frequency. On the other hand, the measured radiation gain and bandwidth of the loaded PIFA are reduced to -22.6 dBi and 0.15% for VSWR ≤ 2, respectively, with a footprint of 0.013 λ0 × 0.018 λ0 at the operating frequency.

85 citations


Cites background from "Circular dielectric resonator anten..."

  • ...The application of high dielectric constant substrates to enhance the effective permittivity is the easiest way to reduce the guided wavelength and thus the physical size of antennas [1]–[3]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the effect of glass additives on the microstructure, densification, and microwave dielectric properties of cerium oxide for low-temperature co-fired applications was investigated.
Abstract: The effect of glass additives on the microstructure, densification, and microwave dielectric properties of cerium oxide for low-temperature co-fired applications was investigated. Different weight percentages of quenched glass such as B2O3, B2O3–SiO2, Al2O3–SiO2, ZnO–B2O3, BaO–B2O3–SiO2, MgO–B2O3–SiO2, PbO–B2O3–SiO2, ZnO–B2O3–SiO2, 2MgO–Al2O3–5SiO2, LiO–B2O3–SiO2, Bi2O3–ZnO–B2O3–SiO2, and LiO–MgO–ZnO–B2O3–SiO2 were added to CeO2 powder. The crystal structure of the ceramic–glass composites was studied by X-ray diffraction, microstructure by scanning electron microscopy, and phase composition using the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis technique. The microwave dielectric properties such as relative permittivity (ɛr), quality factor (Quxf), and coefficient of temperature variation of resonant frequency (τf) of the ceramics have been measured in the frequency range 4–6 GHz. Addition of B2O3 and Bi2O3–ZnO–B2O3–SiO2 lowered the sintering temperature of ceria to about 900°C. The 20 wt% B2O3 and 10 wt% Bi2O3–ZnO–B2O3–SiO2-added CeO2 and sintered at 900° and 950°C showed: Quxf=24 200 and 12 000 GHz, ɛr= 13.2 and 22.4, and τf=−46 and –57.2 ppm/°C, respectively.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive investigation of research carried out on dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) in the last three and half decades, in an application-oriented approach, is presented.
Abstract: This survey article outlines a comprehensive investigation of research carried out on dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) in the last three and half decades, in an application-oriented approach. DRAs have created a remarkable position in antenna engineering for their adept characteristics like high efficiency, low loss, wide bandwidth, compact size, 3-dimensional modeling flexibility, etc. The use of DRAs for different commercial and defense applications associated with the wireless communication is highlighted in this article. To make a smooth and effective survey article, all the application-oriented DRAs available in the open literature are classified in five different categories like microwave bands, specific frequency, technology, millimeter-wave, and miscellaneous types. The ultimate aims of this review article are as follows: (i) highlights the usability of DRAs for different commercial and defense applications, (ii) helpful for the antenna industries/manufacturers to find out the best DRA for any specific application as per their requirement, and (iii) points out research gap in some application domains which will be quite helpful for future antenna researchers. In the authors' opinion, this survey may be helpful to DRA researchers as such a survey process is not available in the open literature.

52 citations