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Journal Article

Citizens in arms: The Swiss experience

01 Jan 2005-Journal on firearms and public policy (Second Amendment Foundation)-Vol. 17, Iss: 1
TL;DR: In this article, an adaptation of the author's presentation at the Tower of London Symposium on The Legal, Economic and Human Rights Implications of Civilian Firearms Ownership and Regulation in May 2003 is presented.
Abstract: This paper is an adaptation of the author's presentation at the Tower of London Symposium on The Legal, Economic and Human Rights Implications of Civilian Firearms Ownership and Regulation in May 2003.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Analysis of International Crime Victimization Survey data and translation of laws and original source material finds the United States has more firearms per capita and per household than either country.
Abstract: The 2011 attempted assassination of a US representative renewed the national gun control debate. Gun advocates claim mass-casualty events are mitigated and deterred with three policies: (a) permissive gun laws, (b) widespread gun ownership, (c) and encouragement of armed civilians who can intercept shooters. They cite Switzerland and Israel as exemplars. We evaluate these claims with analysis of International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) data and translation of laws and original source material. Swiss and Israeli laws limit firearm ownership and require permit renewal one to four times annually. ICVS analysis finds the United States has more firearms per capita and per household than either country. Switzerland and Israel curtail off-duty soldiers' firearm access to prevent firearm deaths. Suicide among soldiers decreased by 40 per cent after the Israeli army's 2006 reforms. Compared with the United States, Switzerland and Israel have lower gun ownership and stricter gun laws, and their policies discourage personal gun ownership.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the basic assumptions and arguments used by the libertarian community in the debate on the right to keep and bear arms, and show the main dilemmas and controversies related to this issue.
Abstract: The aim of the article is to present the basic assumptions and arguments used by the libertarian activist community in the debate on the right to keep and bear arms. Access to weapons is currently one of the most important socio-legal problems in the area of the state-citizen relationships for the libertarian doctrine. Another purpose of the article is to show the main dilemmas and controversies related to this issue. The article uses the arguments taken from the basic literature supporting liberalisation in this area, as well as the opinions of libertarian environments demanding a radical abolition of state rigor in this matter. The article consists of four parts, i.e. it outlines the framework of the problem, demonstrates the attitude of the libertarian movement to the state control of arms, analyses exemplary dilemmas resulting from statistical surveys and summarises the problem taking account of a possible future and the movement’s strategy related to the problem discussed.

1 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Analysis of International Crime Victimization Survey data and translation of laws and original source material finds the United States has more firearms per capita and per household than either country.
Abstract: The 2011 attempted assassination of a US representative renewed the national gun control debate. Gun advocates claim mass-casualty events are mitigated and deterred with three policies: (a) permissive gun laws, (b) widespread gun ownership, (c) and encouragement of armed civilians who can intercept shooters. They cite Switzerland and Israel as exemplars. We evaluate these claims with analysis of International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) data and translation of laws and original source material. Swiss and Israeli laws limit firearm ownership and require permit renewal one to four times annually. ICVS analysis finds the United States has more firearms per capita and per household than either country. Switzerland and Israel curtail off-duty soldiers' firearm access to prevent firearm deaths. Suicide among soldiers decreased by 40 per cent after the Israeli army's 2006 reforms. Compared with the United States, Switzerland and Israel have lower gun ownership and stricter gun laws, and their policies discourage personal gun ownership.

17 citations

Book
12 May 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the factors that facilitate or impede the access of gun control to the political agenda in the wake of rampage shootings and analyze why some political debates lead to profound shifts of the policy status quo, while others peter out without any legislative reactions.
Abstract: The author sets out to unravel the factors that facilitate or impede the access of gun control to the political agenda in the wake of rampage shootings and analyses why some political debates lead to profound shifts of the policy status quo, while others peter out without any legislative reactions. In so doing, the book not only contributes to the theoretical literature on crisis-induced policy making, but also provides a wealth of case-study evidence on rampage shootings as empirical phenomena. In particular, the extent to which gun control gets politicized as a policy failure can either result from a bottom-up process (event severity and media pressure) or from a top-down logic (issue ownership and the electoral cycle). Including 12 case studies on the rampage shootings which have triggered a debate over the appropriateness of the affected countries´ gun policies, it illustrates that the way political processes unfold after rampage shootings depends strongly on specific causal configurations and draws comparisons between the cases covered in the book and the way rampage shootings are typically dealt with in the United States.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the basic assumptions and arguments used by the libertarian community in the debate on the right to keep and bear arms, and show the main dilemmas and controversies related to this issue.
Abstract: The aim of the article is to present the basic assumptions and arguments used by the libertarian activist community in the debate on the right to keep and bear arms. Access to weapons is currently one of the most important socio-legal problems in the area of the state-citizen relationships for the libertarian doctrine. Another purpose of the article is to show the main dilemmas and controversies related to this issue. The article uses the arguments taken from the basic literature supporting liberalisation in this area, as well as the opinions of libertarian environments demanding a radical abolition of state rigor in this matter. The article consists of four parts, i.e. it outlines the framework of the problem, demonstrates the attitude of the libertarian movement to the state control of arms, analyses exemplary dilemmas resulting from statistical surveys and summarises the problem taking account of a possible future and the movement’s strategy related to the problem discussed.

1 citations