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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.LANWPC.2021.100108

Clinical characteristics and mortality associated with COVID-19 in Jakarta, Indonesia: A hospital-based retrospective cohort study

02 Mar 2021-Vol. 9, pp 100108-100108
Abstract: Background Data on COVID-19-related mortality and associated factors from low-resource settings are scarce. This study examined clinical characteristics and factors associated with in-hospital mortality of COVID-19 patients in Jakarta, Indonesia, from March 2 to July 31, 2020. Methods This retrospective cohort included all hospitalised patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 in 55 hospitals. We extracted demographic and clinical data, including hospital outcomes (discharge or death). We used logistic regression to examine factors associated with mortality. Findings Of 4265 patients with a definitive outcome by July 31, 3768 (88%) were discharged and 497 (12%) died. The median age was 46 years (IQR 32–57), 5% were children, and 31% had >1 comorbidity. Age-specific mortalities were 11% (7/61) for 3) symptoms; immediate ICU admission, or intubation. Across all ages, risk of death was higher for patients with >1 comorbidity compared to those without; notably the risk was six-fold increased among patients <50 years (adjusted odds ratio 5.87, 95%CI 3.28–10.52; 27% vs 3% mortality). Interpretation Overall in-hospital mortality was lower than reported in high-income countries, probably due to younger age distribution and fewer comorbidities. Deaths occurred across all ages, with >10% mortality among children 50 years.

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Topics: Retrospective cohort study (55%), Odds ratio (52%)
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13 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/D41586-021-02146-W
01 Aug 2021-Nature
Abstract: Data on the variant’s spread in India make researchers fearful for areas in developing nations that lack health care and vaccines. Data on the variant’s spread in India make researchers fearful for areas in developing nations that lack health care and vaccines.

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Topics: Rural health (55%), Health care (53%)

5 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JIPH.2021.06.010
Mukesh Bairwa1, Rajesh Kumar1, Mohammed Ajmal1, Yogesh Bahurupi1  +1 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Introduction An unidentified cluster of pneumonia was identified in Wuhan city of China in the last week of December 2019, named Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-COV-2). The current study explored the predictors associated with critical illness and mortality based on symptoms at the time of admission and initial physical examination findings in patients with SARS-CoV-2. Material and methods A total of 249 records of laboratory-confirmed SARS-COV-2 patients were analyzed. Demographic profile and findings of initial physical examination were collected and analyzed. Bivariate logistic and multivariable stepwise forward regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of critical illness and mortality. Results A total of 249 records of SARS-COV-2 patients were retrospectively studied, of whom 66 (26.5%) developed a critical illness, and 58 (23.29%) died. The mean age of patients was 45.15 (16.34) years; 171 (68.71%) were men. From 27 potential predictors for developing a critical illness, 15 were reported independent predictors for critical illness, and 13 were for increased risk of mortality. Stepwise forward regression reported dyspnea as a single strongest predictor (OR, 5.800, 95% CI-2.724−12.346; p = 0.001, R2 = 0.272) to develop critical illness. Likewise, the respiratory rate was alone reported as a strong predictor (OR, 1.381, 95% CI- 1.251−1.525; p = 0.000, R2 = 0.329) for mortality. Conclusions Coronavirus disease is a new challenge to the medical fraternity, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of potential risk factors could help clinicians assess patients' risk with unfavourable outcomes and improve hospitalization decisions in the early stage.

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2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/BIOM11060876
12 Jun 2021-
Abstract: The receptor for advanced glycation-end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor with a role in inflammatory and pulmonary pathologies. Hyperactivation of RAGE by its ligands has been reported to sustain inflammation and oxidative stress in common comorbidities of severe COVID-19. RAGE is essential to the deleterious effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which participates in infection and multiorgan injury in COVID-19 patients. Thus, RAGE might be a major player in severe COVID-19, and appears to be a useful therapeutic molecular target in infections by SARS-CoV-2. The role of RAGE gene polymorphisms in predisposing patients to severe COVID-19 is discussed. .

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Topics: RAGE (receptor) (64%)

2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1186/S41182-021-00346-8
Kristal An Agrupis1, Chris Smith1, Chris Smith2, Shuichi Suzuki1  +15 moreInstitutions (2)
Abstract: The Philippines has been one of the most affected COVID-19 countries in the Western Pacific region, but there are limited data on COVID-19-related mortality and associated factors from this setting. We aimed to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics and associations with mortality among COVID-19-confirmed individuals admitted to an infectious diseases referral hospital in Metro Manila. This was a single-centre retrospective analysis including the first 500 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 individuals admitted to San Lazaro Hospital, Metro Manila, Philippines, from January to October 2020. We extracted clinical data and examined epidemiological and clinical characteristics and factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Of the 500 individuals, 133 (26.6%) were healthcare workers (HCW) and 367 (73.4%) were non-HCW, with HCW more likely presenting with milder symptoms. Non-HCW admissions were more likely to have at least one underlying disease (51.6% vs. 40.0%; p = 0.002), with hypertension (35.4%), diabetes (17.4%), and tuberculosis (8.2%) being the most common. Sixty-one (12.2%) died, comprising 1 HCW and 60 non-HCW (0.7% vs. 16.3%; p < 0.001). Among the non-HCW, no death occurred for the 0–10 years age group, but deaths were recorded across all other age groups. Compared to those who recovered, individuals who died were more likely to be older (p < 0.001), male (p = 0.015), report difficulty of breathing (p < 0.001), be HIV positive (p = 0.008), be intubated (p < 0.001), categorised as severe or critical (p < 0.001), have a shorter mean hospital stay (p < 0.001), or have an additional diagnosis of pneumonia (p < 0.001) or ARDS (p < 0.001). Our analysis reflected significant differences in characteristics, symptomatology, and outcomes between healthcare and non-healthcare workers. Despite the unique mix of cohorts, our results support the country’s national guideline on COVID-19 vaccination which prioritises healthcare workers, the elderly, and people with comorbidities and immunodeficiency states.

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1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.ECLINM.2021.101155
Qianling Shi1, Zijun Wang1, Jiao Liu2, Xingmei Wang2  +7 moreInstitutions (2)
01 Nov 2021-EClinicalMedicine
Abstract: Background This study provides the first systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the predictors of unfavorable prognosis of COVID-19 in children and adolescents. Methods We searched literature databases until July 2021 for studies that investigated risk factors for unfavorable prognosis of children and adolescents with COVID-19. We used random-effects models to estimate the effect size with 95% confidence interval (CI). Findings We identified 56 studies comprising 79,104 individuals. Mortality was higher in patients with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) (odds ratio [OR]=58.00, 95% CI 6.39–526.79) and who were admitted to intensive care (OR=12.64, 95% CI 3.42–46.68). Acute respiratry distress syndrme (ARDS) (OR=29.54, 95% CI 12.69–68.78) and acute kidney injury (AKI) (OR=55.02, 95% CI 6.26–483.35) increased the odds to be admitted to intensive care; shortness of breath (OR=16.96, 95% CI 7.66–37.51) increased the need of respiratory support; and neurological diseases (OR=5.16, 95% CI 2.30–11.60), C-reactive protein (CRP) level ≥80 mg/L (OR=11.70, 95% CI 4.37–31.37) and D-dimer level ≥0.5ug/mL (OR=20.40, 95% CI 1.76–236.44) increased the odds of progression to severe or critical disease. Interpretation Congenital heart disease, chronic pulmonary disease, neurological diseases, obesity, MIS-C, shortness of breath, ARDS, AKI, gastrointestinal symptoms, elevated CRP and D-dimer are associated with unfavourable prognosis in children and adolescents with COVID-19. Funding None.

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Topics: Intensive care (55%), Odds ratio (55%), Risk factor (53%)

1 Citations


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32 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJMOA2002032
Wei-jie Guan1, Zhengyi Ni1, Yu Hu1, Wenhua Liang1  +33 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Background Since December 2019, when coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) emerged in Wuhan city and rapidly spread throughout China, data have been needed on the clinical characteristics of...

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16,855 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJMOA2001017
Na Zhu1, Dingyu Zhang, Wenling Wang1, Xingwang Li2  +15 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: In December 2019, a cluster of patients with pneumonia of unknown cause was linked to a seafood wholesale market in Wuhan, China. A previously unknown betacoronavirus was discovered through the use of unbiased sequencing in samples from patients with pneumonia. Human airway epithelial cells were used to isolate a novel coronavirus, named 2019-nCoV, which formed a clade within the subgenus sarbecovirus, Orthocoronavirinae subfamily. Different from both MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, 2019-nCoV is the seventh member of the family of coronaviruses that infect humans. Enhanced surveillance and further investigation are ongoing. (Funded by the National Key Research and Development Program of China and the National Major Project for Control and Prevention of Infectious Disease in China.).

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Topics: Coronavirus (57%), Betacoronavirus (56%)

15,285 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30566-3
Fei Zhou1, Ting Yu, Ronghui Du, Guohui Fan2  +16 moreInstitutions (5)
28 Mar 2020-The Lancet
Abstract: Summary Background Since December, 2019, Wuhan, China, has experienced an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 have been reported but risk factors for mortality and a detailed clinical course of illness, including viral shedding, have not been well described. Methods In this retrospective, multicentre cohort study, we included all adult inpatients (≥18 years old) with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from Jinyintan Hospital and Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital (Wuhan, China) who had been discharged or had died by Jan 31, 2020. Demographic, clinical, treatment, and laboratory data, including serial samples for viral RNA detection, were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between survivors and non-survivors. We used univariable and multivariable logistic regression methods to explore the risk factors associated with in-hospital death. Findings 191 patients (135 from Jinyintan Hospital and 56 from Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital) were included in this study, of whom 137 were discharged and 54 died in hospital. 91 (48%) patients had a comorbidity, with hypertension being the most common (58 [30%] patients), followed by diabetes (36 [19%] patients) and coronary heart disease (15 [8%] patients). Multivariable regression showed increasing odds of in-hospital death associated with older age (odds ratio 1·10, 95% CI 1·03–1·17, per year increase; p=0·0043), higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (5·65, 2·61–12·23; p Interpretation The potential risk factors of older age, high SOFA score, and d-dimer greater than 1 μg/mL could help clinicians to identify patients with poor prognosis at an early stage. Prolonged viral shedding provides the rationale for a strategy of isolation of infected patients and optimal antiviral interventions in the future. Funding Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences; National Science Grant for Distinguished Young Scholars; National Key Research and Development Program of China; The Beijing Science and Technology Project; and Major Projects of National Science and Technology on New Drug Creation and Development.

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Topics: Cohort study (56%), Retrospective cohort study (56%), Odds ratio (53%) ... read more

15,279 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.7326/0003-4819-147-8-200710160-00010
E von Elm1, Douglas G. Altman2, Matthias Egger1, Matthias Egger3  +3 moreInstitutions (6)
Abstract: Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalizability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover 3 main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors, to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to all 3 study designs and 4 are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available at http://www.annals.org and on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

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6,620 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30120-1
Ensheng Dong1, Hongru Du1, Lauren Gardner1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has induced a considerable degree of fear, emotional stress and anxiety among individuals around t

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Topics: Dashboard (business) (62%), Web application (53%)

5,397 Citations