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Journal ArticleDOI

Codesign with more-than-humans: toward a meta co-design tool for human-non-human collaborations

TL;DR: In this article , a more-than-human model is proposed for a multispecies Symposium in the future, where the goal is to foster reflections and provoke discussions about social and environmental sustainability, innovations and technologies, leaving gaps to be filled with the audience imagination.
Abstract: Abstract What does more-than-human mean? How can we, as humans, understand that our ecology is only one of the many that do exist within the world? Furthermore, in which way should we step aside to let all ecological actors exercise their agency? And, more specifically, what should be the role of design and designers in tackling complex issues and in contributing to a major shift in thoughts? These questions fostered a reflection on the relation between possible futures and the design practice itself and set the basis for the creation of a provotype. A provotype (from “ provo cation” and “proto type ”) is a conceptual product or an artifact whose objective is to foster reflections and provoke discussions mainly concerning social and environmental sustainability, innovations, and technologies, leaving gaps to be filled with the audience imagination. The research reported in this contribution deals with issues and questions that fall under the umbrella of the topic of alternative biopolitics in future scenarios: how can we co-design with more-than-human actors? In which way can symbiosis between different entities be achieved? What is the meaning of interspecies justice, and which should be the steps to follow to fulfill it? And, finally, maybe the most significant question to focus on: how can communication between different entities be fostered? The designed provotype consists of a fictional event (“The first Multispecies Symposium”) which takes place in 2100, further helped the researchers in opening new reflections that made it possible to experiment with participatory design and to finalize a tool that can be used to share and expand reflections about futures without hierarchies, not human-centered, sustainable progress and hope, participative futures.

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Citations
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
29 May 2023
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors developed and explored the BULL (Biodiversity Urban Living Lab) approach, building on the existing City Commons HCI framework, using research-through-design and action research methods.
Abstract: Recent interest in biodiversity to combat climate crises led governments to use data platforms and sensing tools to monitor, conserve and increase city biodiversity. Given that most of these tools are designed for expert users and most city space is privately owned, there is a growing need for urban living labs (ULLs) approaches that combine community co-design with HCI for biodiversity. This paper develops and explores the BULL (Biodiversity Urban Living Lab) approach, building on the existing City Commons HCI framework, using research-through-design and action research methods. A BULL approach should not only engage citizens but also lead to opportunities for individual and collective action towards biodiversity as perceived common. Next to this, ecological and technological entities as non-human actors need to be involved in community-based co-creation in BULLs. The BULL approach provides a process and specific tools for multi-stakeholder groups, including more-than-human ones, to experiment with opportunities for more biodiversity in a local community, resulting in individual and collective action.
Proceedings ArticleDOI
16 Nov 2022
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors analyze the theme of human-nature interactions mediated by technologies from different perspectives and apply three lenses: the first one is more pragmatic and oriented by technological applications, and thus, with relapses on design practices, while the other two are theoretical -decolonization and post-human feminism -and they provide a critical vision of the topics of interest from an ontological and epistemological point of view.
Abstract: The research aims at analyzing the theme of human-nature interactions mediated by technologies from different perspectives and applying three lenses: the first one is more pragmatic and oriented by technological applications, and, thus, with relapses on design practices, while the other two are theoretical – decolonization and post-human feminism – and they provide a critical vision of the topics of interest from an ontological and epistemological point of view, with relapses on design theories. Therefore, the goal of the research is to provide a first draft of a framework, designed through a process of literature review and case studies analysis, that can stimulate more-than-human connections as collaborative and symbiotic processes between human and non-human agents, oriented by new perspectives upon technology.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
24 Jun 2008-Codesign
TL;DR: The evolution in design research from a user-centred approach to co-designing is changing the roles of the designer, the researcher and the person formerly known as the "user" as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Designers have been moving increasingly closer to the future users of what they design and the next new thing in the changing landscape of design research has become co-designing with your users. But co-designing is actually not new at all, having taken distinctly different paths in the US and in Europe. The evolution in design research from a user-centred approach to co-designing is changing the roles of the designer, the researcher and the person formerly known as the ‘user’. The implications of this shift for the education of designers and researchers are enormous. The evolution in design research from a user-centred approach to co-designing is changing the landscape of design practice as well, creating new domains of collective creativity. It is hoped that this evolution will support a transformation toward more sustainable ways of living in the future.

3,692 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Mar 2015-Nature
TL;DR: The authors reviewed the historical genesis of the Anthropocene Epoch idea and assessed anthropogenic signatures in the geological record against the formal requirements for the recognition of a new epoch, finding that of the various proposed dates two do appear to conform to the criteria to mark the beginning of the anthropocene: 1610 and 1964.
Abstract: Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Here we review the historical genesis of the idea and assess anthropogenic signatures in the geological record against the formal requirements for the recognition of a new epoch. The evidence suggests that of the various proposed dates two do appear to conform to the criteria to mark the beginning of the Anthropocene: 1610 and 1964. The formal establishment of an Anthropocene Epoch would mark a fundamental change in the relationship between humans and the Earth system.

1,578 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: The article reports on the conditions for the transfer of “PD results” to workers, user groups, and design professionals that have characterized PD over time and across geopolitical terrains and frames directions for a continuing dialogue between researchers and practitioners from the two fields.
Abstract: We characterize Participatory Design (PD) as a maturing area of research and as an evolving practice among design professionals. Although PD has been applied outside of technology design, here we focus on PD in relation to the introduction of computer-based systems at work. We discuss three main issues addressed by PD researchers; the politics of design; the nature of participation; and method, tools and techniques for participation. We also report on the conditions for the transfer of ’’PD results‘‘ to workers, user groups, and design professionals that have characterized PD over time and across geopolitical terrains. The topic of the sustainability of PD within an organizational context is also considered. The article concludes with a discussion of common issues explored within PD and CSCW and frames directions for a continuing dialogue between researchers and practitioners from the two fields. The article draws on a review of PD and CSCW literatures as well as on our own research and practical experiences.

1,031 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
05 May 2012
TL;DR: It is suggested that the design research community should be wary of impulses towards convergence and standardisation, and instead take pride in its aptitude for exploring and speculating, particularising and diversifying, and - especially - its ability to manifest the results in the form of new, conceptually rich artefacts.
Abstract: In this essay, I explore several facets of research through design in order to contribute to discussions about how the approach should develop. The essay has three parts. In the first, I review two influential theories from the Philosophy of Science to help reflect on the nature of design theory, concluding that research through design is likely to produce theories that are provisional, contingent, and aspirational. In the second part, I discuss three possible interpretations for the diversity of approaches to research through design, and suggest that this variation need not be seen as a sign of inadequate standards or a lack of cumulative progress in the field, but may be natural for a generative endeavour. In the final section, I suggest that, rather than aiming to develop increasingly comprehensive theories of design, practice based research might better view theory as annotation of realised design examples, and particularly portfolios of related pieces. Overall, I suggest that the design research community should be wary of impulses towards convergence and standardisation, and instead take pride in its aptitude for exploring and speculating, particularising and diversifying, and - especially - its ability to manifest the results in the form of new, conceptually rich artefacts.

774 citations

Trending Questions (1)
How can the values of non-human entities be incorporated into the design process?

The answer to the query is not provided in the paper. The paper discusses the importance of considering the rights and interests of non-human entities and the role of design in tackling complex issues, but it does not specifically address how the values of non-human entities can be incorporated into the design process.