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Journal ArticleDOI

Codex Ultor: Toward a Conceptual and Theoretical Foundation for New Research on Books and Knowledge Environments

TL;DR: The conceptual and theoretical foundations for work undertaken by the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) research group are presented, which aim to contribute to the development of new digital information and knowledge environments that build on past textual practices.
Abstract: In this paper, we present the conceptual and theoretical foundations for work undertaken by the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) research group, a large international, interdisciplinary research team studying reading and texts, both digital and printed. The INKE team is comprised of researchers and stakeholders at the forefronts of fields relating to textual studies, user experience, interface design, and information management. We aim to contribute to the development of new digital information and knowledge environments that build on past textual practices. In this piece, we discuss our research questions, methods, aims and research objectives, the rationale behind our work and its expected significance.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sherman as discussed by the authors presents a reassessment of the career and cultural background of John Dee (1527-1609), one of Elizabethan England's most interesting figures, revealing that he was a well-connected adviser to the academic, courtly and commercial circles of his day.
Abstract: This text presents a reassessment of the career and cultural background of John Dee (1527-1609), one of Elizabethan England's most interesting figures. Challenging the conventional image of the isolated eccentric philosopher, Sherman situates Dee in a fresh context, revealing that he was a well-connected adviser to the academic, courtly and commercial circles of his day. The centrepiece of Dee's life is shown to be the massive library and museum at Mortlake, perhaps the first modern \"think tank\". There he lived, worked and entertained some of the period's most influential intellectuals and politicians. Sherman discusses Dee's household arrangements, reading practices, and writings on subjects ranging from calendar reform to imperial policy. He also offers an account of the broad network of scholars and other experts who, along with Dee, operated behind the political scenes, providing textual and technological support during this time of unprecedented intellectual and global expansion.

174 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that, just as an edition of a book can be a means of reifying a theory about how books should be edited, so can the creation of an experimental digital prototype be understood as conveying an argument about designing interfaces.
Abstract: In this article, we argue that, just as an edition of a book can be a means of reifying a theory about how books should be edited, so can the creation of an experimental digital prototype be understood as conveying an argument about designing interfaces. Building on this premise, we explore theoretical affinities shared by recent design and book history scholarship, and connect those theories to the emerging practice of peer-reviewing digital objects in scholarly contexts. We suggest a checklist for subjecting prototypes directly to peer review: • Is the argument reified by the prototype contestable, defensible, and substantive? • Does the prototype have a recognizable position in the context of similar work, either in terms of concept or affordances? • Is the prototype part of a series of prototypes with an identifiable trajectory? • Does the prototype address possible objections? • Is the prototype itself an original contribution to knowledge? We also outline some implications for funding agencies interested in supporting researchers who are designing experimental computer prototypes. For instance, if a series of prototypes functions as a set of smaller arguments within a larger debate, it might be more appropriate to fund the sequence rather than treating each project as an individual proposal.

106 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: Values in the 19th Century British Novel: Decline and Transformation of a Semantic Field and the Cultural Impact of New Media on American Literary Writing.
Abstract: Values in the 19th Century British Novel: Decline and Transformation of a Semantic Field Le-Khac, Long; Heuser, Ryan..................................................................................................................... 170 Comparing the Similarities and Differences between Two Translations Lucic, Ana; Blake, Catherine.......................................................................................................................174 Digital Image Analysis and Interactive Visualization of 1000000 Manga Pages Manovich, Lev; Huber, William; Douglass, Jeremy.....................................................................................177 Expressive Power of Markup Languages and Graph Structures Marcoux, Yves; Sperberg-McQueen, Michael; Huitfeldt, Claus.................................................................. 178 Omeka in the Classroom: The Challenges of Teaching Material Culture in a Digital World Marsh, Allison.............................................................................................................................................. 180 Towards a Narrative GIS McIntosh, John; De Lozier, Grant; Cantrell, Jacob; Yuan, May..................................................................182 Charlotte’s Web: Encoding the Literary History of the Sentimental Novel Melson, John; Funchion, John.................................................................................................................... 186 The Digital Dictionary of Buddhism: A Collaborative XML-Based Reference Work that has become a Field Standard: Technology and Sustainable Management Strategies Muller, Charles. A........................................................................................................................................ 188 Digital Humanities 2011 XIV Tasks vs. Roles: A Center Perspective on Data Curation Needs in the Humanities Muñoz, Trevor; Varvel, Virgil; Renear, Allen H.; Trainor, Kevin; Dolan, Molly.............................................190 When to Ask for Help: Evaluating Projects for Crowdsourcing Organisciak, Peter....................................................................................................................................... 194 The Cultural Impact of New Media on American Literary Writing: Refining a Conceptual Framework Paling, Stephen........................................................................................................................................... 196 Browsing Highly Interconnected Humanities Databases Through Multi-Result Faceted Browsers Pasin, Michele............................................................................................................................................. 199 Civil War Washington: An Experiment in Freedom, Integration, and Constraint Price, Ken; Barney, Brett; Lorang, Liz.........................................................................................................202 A Data Model for Visualising Textuality – The Würzburg Saint Matthew Rehbein, Malte.............................................................................................................................................204 Toward a Demography of Literary Forms: Building on Moretti's Graphs Riddell, Allen B............................................................................................................................................ 206 Computing in Canada: a History of the Incunabular Years Rockwell, Geoffrey; Smith, Victoria Susan; Hoosein, Sophia; Gouglas, Sean; Quamen, Harvey...............207 Religo: A Relationship System Rodríguez, Nuria; Isolani, Alida; Lombardini, Dianella; Marotta, Daniele................................................... 210 Development of Digital Projects as Learning Strategies. The Desingcrea/Diseñoteca Project Rodríguez, Nuria..........................................................................................................................................213 An Ontological View of Canonical Citations Romanello, Matteo; Pasin, Michele.............................................................................................................216 Alma Cardell Curtin and Jeremiah Curtin: the Translator’s Wife's Stylistic Fingerprint Rybicki, Jan................................................................................................................................................. 218 Evaluating Digital Scholarship: A Case Study in the Field of Literature Schreibman, Susan; Mandell, Laura; Olsen, Stephen................................................................................221 Automatic Extraction of Catalog Data from Genizah Fragments’ Images Shweka, Roni; Choueka, Yaacov; Wolf, Lior; Dershowitz, Nachum; Zeldin, Masha...................................224 A Trip Around the World: Balancing Geographical Diversity in Academic Research Teams Siemens, Lynne; Burr, Elisabeth; Cunningham, Richard; Duff, Wendy; Forest, Dominic; Warwick, Claire............................................................................................................................................................226 Mining Language Resources from Institutional Repositories Simons, Gary F.; Bird, Steven; Hirt, Christopher; Hou, Joshua; Pedersen, Sven.......................................230 Knowing and Doing: Understanding the Digital Humanities Curriculum Spiro, Lisa....................................................................................................................................................232 Digital Humanities 2011 XV Layer upon Layer. “Computational Archaeology” in 15th Century Middle Dutch Historiography. Stapel, Rombert...........................................................................................................................................234 Reforming Digital Historical Peer Review: Guidelines for Applying Digital Historiography to the Evaluative Process Sternfeld, Joshua.........................................................................................................................................237 You Suck at Narrative: Disciplinarity, Popular Culture, and the Database Logic of Photoshop Stroupe, Craig..............................................................................................................................................240 Medical Case Studies on Renaissance Melancholy: Online Publication Project Suciu, Radu................................................................................................................................................. 242 A User-Centered Digital Edition of Vuk Stefanović Karadžić's Lexicon Serbico-GermanicoLatinum Tasovac, Toma; Ermolaev, Natalia..............................................................................................................243 Probabilistic Analysis of Middle English Orthography: the Auchinleck Manuscript Thaisen, Jacob............................................................................................................................................ 247 Opening the Gates: A New Model for Edition Production in a Time of Collaboration Timney, Meagan; Leitch, Cara; Siemens, Ray............................................................................................249 The Born Digital Graduate: Multiple Representations of and within Digital Humanities PhD Theses Webb, Sharon; Teehan, Aja; Keating, John................................................................................................252 Computational Analysis of Gender and the Body in European Fairy Tales Weingart, Scott; Jorgensen, Jeana............................................................................................................. 255 The UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology: Lessons Learned Wendrich, Willeke........................................................................................................................................ 258 Possible Worlds: Authorial Markup and Digital Scholarship Wernimont, Jacqueline; Flanders, Julia...................................................................................................... 260 Interedition: Principles, Practice and Products of an Open Collaborative Development Model for Digital Scholarly Editions van Zundert, Joris; Middell, Gregor; Van Hulle, Dirk; Andrews, Tara L.; Haentjens Dekker, Ronald; Neyt, Vincent......................................................................................................................................................... 262

37 citations

21 Oct 2009
TL;DR: Architectures of the Book (or ArchBook) as discussed by the authors is an online knowledge base, which illustrates the features, technologies, and practices of transmitting knowledge in textual form, and is the most comprehensive online reference for the history of the book.
Abstract: Textual scholars have served both as chroniclers of how humans interact with their written records, and, more actively, as agents themselves in many of the changes that those interactions have undergone. This chapter describes the rationale and initial goals of a particular group of digital textual scholars, the Textual Studies team within the Implementing New Knowledge Environments project (INKE.ca), but also considers the role of textual studies generally in a digital world. This chapter also outlines the online knowledge base, titled Architectures of the Book (or ArchBook), which illustrates the features, technologies, and practices of transmitting knowledge in textual form. ArchBook will not only be the most comprehensive online reference for the history of the book, but will also promote research on the future of the book through its focus on the information architecture of texts.

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Jul 2019
TL;DR: Open Social Scholarship as discussed by the authors surveys foundational publications, innovative research projects, and global organizations that enact the theories and practices of open social scholarship through aggregation and summation of critical resources in the field.
Abstract: This annotated bibliography responds to and contextualizes the growing “Open” movements and recent institutional reorientation towards social, public-facing scholarship. The aim of this document is to present a working definition of open social scholarship through the aggregation and summation of critical resources in the field. Our work surveys foundational publications, innovative research projects, and global organizations that enact the theories and practices of open social scholarship. The bibliography builds on the knowledge creation principles outlined in previous research by broadening the focus beyond traditional academic spaces and reinvigorating central, defining themes with recently published research.

21 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: The GOMS Model of Manuscript Editing as mentioned in this paper has been used in many applications, e.g., for text selection and text editing in computer science, and for circuit design.
Abstract: Contents: Preface. An Applied Information-Processing Psychology. Part I: Science Base. The Human Information-Processor. Part II: Text-Editing. System and User Variability. An Exercise in Task Analysis. The GOMS Model of Manuscript Editing. Extensions of the GOMS Analysis. Models of Devices for Text Selection. Part III: Engineering Models. The Keystroke-Level Model. The Unit-Task Level of Analysis. Part IV: Extensions and Generalizations. An Exploration into Circuit Design. Cognitive Skill. Applying Psychology to Design Reprise.

4,999 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this article, Manovich uses concepts from film theory, art history, literary theory, and computer science and also develops new theoretical constructs, such as cultural interface, spatial montage, and cinegratography.
Abstract: "In this book Lev Manovich offers the first systematic and rigorous theory of new media. He places new media within the histories of visual and media cultures of the last few centuries. He discusses new media's reliance on conventions of old media, such as the rectangular frame and mobile camera, and shows how new media works create the illusion of reality, address the viewer, and represent space. He also analyzes categories and forms unique to new media, such as interface and database. Manovich uses concepts from film theory, art history, literary theory, and computer science and also develops new theoretical constructs, such as cultural interface, spatial montage, and cinegratography. The theory and history of cinema play a particularly important role in the book. Among other topics, Manovich discusses parallels between the histories of cinema and of new media, digital cinema, screen and montage in cinema and in new media, and historical ties between avant-garde film and new media." -- Publisher's website.

3,590 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors make the connection between our emotions and how we relate to ordinary objects, from juicers to Jaguars, and argue that design experts have vastly underestimated the role of emotion on our experience of everyday objects.
Abstract: By the author of The Design of Everyday Things , the first book to make the connection between our emotions and how we relate to ordinary objects--from juicers to Jaguars. Did you ever wonder why cheap wine tastes better in fancy glasses? Why sales of Macintosh computers soared when Apple introduced the colorful iMac? New research on emotion and cognition has shown that attractive things really do work better, a fact fans of Don Norman's classic The Design of Everyday Things cannot afford to ignore.In recent years, the design community has focused on making products easier to use. But as Norman amply demonstrates in this fascinating and important new book, design experts have vastly underestimated the role of emotion on our experience of everyday objects. Emotional Design analyzes the profound influence of this deceptively simple idea, from our willingness to spend thousands of dollars on Gucci bags and Rolex watches to the impact of emotion on the everyday objects of tomorrow. In the future, will inanimate objects respond to human emotions? Is it possible to create emotional robots?Norman addresses these provocative questions--drawing on a wealth of examples and the latest scientific insights--in this bold exploration of the objects in our everyday world.

3,469 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A As the local site coordinator finished his introduction to the meeting, the group had taken on a glazed look, showing polite interest, but no real enthusiasm, and worries were increasing.
Abstract: A As the local site coordinator finished his introduction to the meeting, our worries were increasing. The group had taken on a glazed look, showing polite interest, but no real enthusiasm. How would they react when we presented them with our packages? Would disinterest deepen to boredom, or even hostility? Cultural Probes Homo ludens impinges on his environment: He interrupts, changes, intensifies; he follows paths and in passing, leaves traces of his presence everywhere.

1,870 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that keeping in mind all five of these roles that a representation plays provides a usefully broad perspective that sheds light on some longstanding disputes and can invigorate both research and practice in the field.
Abstract: Although knowledge representation is one of the central and, in some ways, most familiar concepts in AI, the most fundamental question about it -- What is it? -- has rarely been answered directly. Numerous papers have lobbied for one or another variety of representation, other papers have argued for various properties a representation should have, and still others have focused on properties that are important to the notion of representation in general. In this article, we go back to basics to address the question directly. We believe that the answer can best be understood in terms of five important and distinctly different roles that a representation plays, each of which places different and, at times, conflicting demands on the properties a representation should have. We argue that keeping in mind all five of these roles provides a usefully broad perspective that sheds light on some longstanding disputes and can invigorate both research and practice in the field.

1,199 citations