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Journal Article

Colonial firearm regulation

01 Jan 2004-Journal on firearms and public policy (Second Amendment Foundation)-Vol. 16, Iss: 1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the laws of the American colonies and demonstrate that at least for the free population, gun control laws were neither laissez-faire nor restrictive.
Abstract: Recently published scholarship concerning the regulation of firearms in Colonial America claims that because Colonial governments distrusted the free population with guns, the laws required guns to be stored centrally, and were not generally allowed in private hands. According to this view, even those guns allowed in private hands were always considered the property of the government. This Article examines the laws of the American colonies and demonstrates that at least for the free population, gun control laws were neither laissez-faire nor restrictive. If Colonial governments evinced any distrust of the free population concerning guns, it was a fear that not enough freemen would own and carry guns. Thus, the governments imposed mandatory gun ownership and carriage laws.
Citations
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Journal Article

24 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The connection between the restrictiveness of a country's civilian weapons policy and its ability to commit genocide upon its own people is discussed in this article. But it is worth noting that not one of the principal genocides of the twentieth century, and there have been dozens, has been inflicted on a population that was armed.
Abstract: We argue the connection between the restrictiveness of a country’s civilian weapons policy and its ability to commit genocide upon its own people. Though it is a long step between being disarmed and being murdered – one does not usually lead to the other – it is nevertheless an arresting reality that not one of the principal genocides of the twentieth century, and there have been dozens, has been inflicted on a population that was armed. The essence of deterrence is not to deal with trouble once it starts, but to keep it from starting in the first place.

11 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The "settling" of the American West has been perceived throughout the world as a series of quaint, violent, and romantic adventures as discussed by the authors. But in fact, Patricia Nelson Limerick argues, the West has a history grounded primarily in economic reality; in hardheaded questions of profit, loss, competition, and consolidation.
Abstract: The \"settling\" of the American West has been perceived throughout the world as a series of quaint, violent, and romantic adventures. But in fact, Patricia Nelson Limerick argues, the West has a history grounded primarily in economic reality; in hardheaded questions of profit, loss, competition, and consolidation. Here she interprets the stories and the characters in a new way: the trappers, traders, Indians, farmers, oilmen, cowboys, and sheriffs of the Old West \"meant business\" in more ways than one, and their descendents mean business today.

649 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: Rummel's "death by government" as discussed by the authors is the fourth book in a series devoted to genocide and government mass murder, or what he calls democide, which is defined as those cases in which one million or more people were killed by a regime.
Abstract: This is R. J. Rummel's fourth book in a series devoted to genocide and government mass murder, or what he calls democide. He presents the primary results, in tables and figures, as well as a historical sketch of the major cases of democide, those in which one million or more people were killed by a regime. In Death by Government, Rummel does not aim to describe democide itself, but to determine its nature and scope in order to test the theory that democracies are inherently nonviolent. Rummel discusses genocide in China, Nazi Germany, Japan, Cambodia, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Poland, the Soviet Union, and Pakistan. He also writes about areas of suspected genocide: North Korea, Mexico, and feudal Russia. His results clearly and decisively show that democracies commit less democide than other regimes. The underlying principle is that the less freedom people have, the greater the violence; the more freedom, the less the violence. Thus, as Rummel says, -The problem is power. The solution is democracy. The course of action is to foster freedom.- Death by Government is a compelling look at the horrors that occur in modern societies. It depicts how democide has been very much a part of human history. Among other examples, the book includes the massacre of Europeans during the Thirty Years' War, the relatively unknown genocide of the French Revolution, and the slaughtering of American Indians by colonists in the New World. This riveting account is an essential tool for historians, political scientists, and scholars interested in the study of genocide.

516 citations

Book
01 Jan 1958

185 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997
Abstract: An examination of women's self-defense culture and its relationship to feminism. I was once a frightened feminist. So begins Martha McCaughey's odyssey into the dynamic world of women's self- defense, a culture which transforms women involved with it and which has equally profound implications for feminist theory and activism. Unprecedented numbers of American women are learning how to knock out, maim, even kill men who assault them. Sales of mace and pepper spray have skyrocketed. Some 14 million women own handguns. From behind the scenes at gun ranges, martial arts dojos, fitness centers offering Cardio Combat, and in padded attacker courses like Model Mugging, Real Knockouts demonstrates how self-defense trains women out of the femininity that makes them easy targets for men's abuse. And yet much feminist thought, like the broader American culture, seems deeply ambivalent about women's embrace of violence, even in self-defense. Investigating the connection between feminist theory and women physically fighting back, McCaughey found self-defense culture to embody, literally, a new brand of feminism.

181 citations