scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Colonialism, injustices of the past, and the hole in Nine

TL;DR: In this article, Cara Nine argues that Lea Ypi's account of the wrongness of colonialism has a hole in it: Ypi leaves open the possibility of justified sett...
Abstract: In ‘Colonialism, territory and pre-existing obligations,’ Cara Nine argues that Lea Ypi’s account of the wrongness of colonialism has a hole in it: Ypi leaves open the possibility of justified sett...
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2020-Theoria
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss their recently published book, Territorial Sovereignty, and how that led them to be interested in this particular project that they dealt with in the book.
Abstract: 18 November 2019CH: Thank you for agreeing to do this. The prompt for the interview was to talk about your recently published book, Territorial Sovereignty, but I thought before we got into that you could say something about your earlier work and how that led you to be interested in this particular project that you deal with in the book.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The cosmopolitan instrumentalist theory of secession as mentioned in this paper argues that a group has a right to secede only if this would promote cosmopolitan justice, and it is preferable to other theories of secession because it is an entailment of cosmopolitanism.
Abstract: I defend the cosmopolitan instrumentalist theory of secession, according to which a group has a right to secede only if this would promote cosmopolitan justice. I argue that the theory is preferable to other theories of secession because it is an entailment of cosmopolitanism, which is independently attractive, and because, unlike other theories of secession, it allows us to give the answers we want to give in cases like secession of the rich or secession that would make things worse for minorities. I defend the view against the objections that it allows for colonialism and annexation, that it is not a distinct theory, and that it is impractical.
References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on those rights ecological refugees may claim on the basis of collective self-determination, and adapt a version of the Lockean proviso for use in territorial rights theory.
Abstract: Ecological refugees are expected to make up an increasing percentage of overall refugees in the coming decades as predicted climate change related disasters will displace millions of people. In this essay, I focus on those rights ecological refugees may claim on the basis of collective self-determination. To this end, I will focus on a few specific cases that I call cases of ‘ecological refugee states’. Tuvalu, the Maldives, and to a certain extent, Bangladesh are predicted to be ecological refugee states in the near future. These are states whose entire (or close to it) geographical territory is predicted to be lost to rising sea levels; the collective body of the people will itself become an ecological refugee. The question is: what may the people of an ecological refugee state legitimately claim on the basis of their right to self-determination? Should we redraw state borders to accommodate a New Tuvalu? I argue that a plausible position regarding territorial rights is that when (1) a people clearly is (or recently was) self-determining and has a legitimate claim to continue to be self-determining, and (2) the self-determination of a people is existentially threatened because the people lacks territorial rights, that (3) the people becomes a candidate for sovereign over a new territory. The result is that existing state borders may need to change to accommodate something like a New Tuvalu. To generate these results on behalf of ecological refugee states, I examine the principles of the system of territorial states. Because the system of territorial states is a system of exclusive rights over goods, especially land, it is possible that it is subject to the conditions of a Lockean proviso mechanism. This paper is dedicated mainly to adapting a version of the Lockean proviso for use in territorial rights theory.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors presented a paper with the support of the Australian Research Council DP110100175, for which they are grateful to participants at these events and especially to Chris Armstrong, Anne Barron, Chris Bertram, Garrett Brown, Dan Butt, Amandine Catala, Paige Digeser, Chris Essert, Graham Finlay, Katrin Flikschuh, Bob Goodin, Leigh Jenco, Catherine Lu, David Miller, Margaret Moore, Avia Pasternak, Nic Southwood, Tim Waligore and Jonathan White for very helpful conversations and comments.
Abstract: This article was written with the support of the Australian Research Council DP110100175, for which I am grateful. Earlier versions were presented at Bristol, Princeton, San Diego, Uppsala, Dublin, Sheffield, LSE, ANU, Darmstadt, Copenhagen, Melbourne, and Queen's University at Kingston. I am grateful to participants at these events and especially to Chris Armstrong, Anne Barron, Chris Bertram, Garrett Brown, Dan Butt, Amandine Catala, Paige Digeser, Chris Essert, Graham Finlay, Katrin Flikschuh, Bob Goodin, Leigh Jenco, Catherine Lu, David Miller, Margaret Moore, Avia Pasternak, Nic Southwood, Tim Waligore, and Jonathan White for very helpful conversations and comments. I am particularly indebted to Annie Stilz for reading several drafts and to the editor and reviewers of Philosophy & Public Affairs for helping me prepare the final version.

79 citations

Book
26 Jul 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the Lockean Proviso and the Ecological Refugee States Bibliography have been used to define the General Right to Territory (GNT) and the Natural Law Theory and the General right to Territory.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Territorial Rights 2. Natural Law Theory and the General Right to Territory 3. The People and Self-Determination 4. A Lockean Theory of Territory 5. Arbitrariness and Territorial Borders 6. Resource Rights 7. Global Justice and Territory 8. The Lockean Proviso and Ecological Refugee States Bibliography

76 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on which rights ecological refugees may claim to collective self-determination, and they adapt a version of the Lockean proviso for use in territorial rights theory.
Abstract: Ecological refugees are expected to make up an increasing percentage of overall refugees in the coming decades as predicted climate change related disasters will displace millions of people. In this essay, I focus on which rights ecological refugees may claim to collective self-determination. To this end, I will focus on a few specific cases that I call cases of ‘ecological refugee states.’ Tuvalu, the Maldives, and to a certain extent, Bangladesh are predicted to be ecological refugee states in the near future. These are states whose entire (or close to it) geographical territory is predicted to be lost to rising sea levels; the collective body of the people will itself become an ecological refugee. The question is: what may the people of an ecological refugee state legitimately claim on the basis of their right to self-determination? Should we redraw state borders to accommodate a New Tuvalu? I argue that a plausible position regarding territorial rights is that when (1) a people clearly is (or recently was) self-determining and has a legitimate claim to continue to be self-determining, and (2) the self-determination of a people is existentially threatened because the people lacks territorial rights, that (3) the people becomes a candidate for sovereign over a new territory. The result is that existing state borders may need to change to accommodate something like a New Tuvalu. To generate these results on behalf of ecological refugee states, I examine the principles of the system of territorial states. Because the system of territorial states is a system of exclusive rights over goods, especially land, it is possible that it is subject to the conditions of a Lockean proviso mechanism. This paper is dedicated mainly to adapting a version of the Lockean proviso for use in territorial rights theory. When applied to the system of territorial states, this simple mechanism governing consistency between principle and practice in rights over land, tells us that ecological refugee states should become candidates as sovereigns over new territories.

68 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 1864, the United States Army removed ten thousand Navajo Indians from their homeland in Arizona to a reservation in New Mexico, where they became dispirited and suffered from hunger, drought, and disease as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In 1864, the United States Army removed ten thousand Navajo Indians from their homeland in Arizona to a reservation in New Mexico. Two hundred people died on the trek, which the Navajos still refer to as their “Long Walk.” Prior to the Long Walk, the Navajos had been a raiding society, stealing livestock from white settlements. To stop the raiding, the United States moved them to an isolated location. But the removal was not a success: the Navajos were unused to farming and their crops failed; they were required to live in adobe villages rather than their traditional hogans; and they had to share their reservation with the Apaches, tribal enemies. During their time at the reservation, the Navajos became dispirited and suffered from hunger, drought, and disease. Many tribe members died, and more ran away. Finally, in 1868, the United States allowed the survivors to return to their lands in Arizona, unlike most other tribes it relocated during the War for the West. The moral issues raised by the Navajo case are typical of territorial removals, including the expulsions of Germans and Poles following

67 citations