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Book ChapterDOI

Community Policing in Canada: An Evaluation for Montreal

01 Jan 2002-pp 209-230
TL;DR: In France and Quebec, they call the model: “Une Police de Proximite.” In Spain and Latin America, the common expression is “Policia de Barrio,” a kind of insurance policy against violence and theft as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In France and Quebec, they call the model: “Une Police de Proximite.” In Spain and Latin America, the common expression is “Policia de Barrio.” In Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States, the term is usually: “Community Policing.” The acronym in North America is almost a pun: C.O.P./P.O.P. (“Community-Oriented Policing”/“Problem-Oriented Policing”). However, for the public, it is simple: “the police is the police,” a kind of insurance policy against violence and theft.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: In Canada, community policing has replaced professional crime control policing as the dominant ideology and organizational model of progressive policing (Murphy, 1988b), and despite the relative lack of external pressures1 for police reform the country has gradually adopted a shift towards community policing as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In Canada, community policing has replaced professional crime control policing as the dominant ideology and organizational model of progressive policing (Murphy, 1988b). What is interesting about Canadian policing — but not unique to it — is that despite the relative lack of external pressures1 for police reform the country has gradually adopted a shift towards community policing. With heavy reliance on ‘US-tested and proven’ police innovations, technologies and strategies, Canadian policing is argued to have used ‘innovation through imitation’. Possibly this took place due to the proximity to the American experience and the growing readiness on the part of police chiefs and administrators to adopt strategies and tactics that seemed to work for their southern neighbour. This, in turn, was perceived as encouraging a wholesale and uncritical import of policing philosophies and technologies — mostly from the country’s American neighbour — which are not always appropriate to Canadian policing (Murphy, 1988b). At the same time, Canada is also not less influenced by the tradition and heritage of British policing and is following developments there quite closely. In fact, a recent community policing conference (organized by Loree and Murphy, 1986) dedicated a greater portion of its proceedings to developments in the London Metropolitan Police Force than to other relevant US advances in community policing.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A partir de un estudio exploratorio desarrollado in una comunidad con altos indices de delincuencia in la ciudad de Oporto, el result of una evaluación a partir of a study of 139 sujetos of the same population, of ambos sexos and with edades entre los 15 and los 84 anos as discussed by the authors.

9 citations


Cites background from "Community Policing in Canada: An Ev..."

  • ...Se creó un modelo basado en la idea de comunidad, guiado por una nueva filosofía que sugiere una especie de “asociación” entre las comunidades y la policía (Normandeau, 2002)....

    [...]

References
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Book
28 May 1992
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors highlight the relationship between disorder and neighborhood life, and propose to expand the scope of the traditionally popular "crime" agenda to encompass other pressing features of urban life.
Abstract: The purpose of this book is to add a new concern to the list of issues contending for position on the nation's urban policy agenda. By highlighting the relationship between disorder and neighborhood life, Disorder and Decline attempts to expand the scope of the traditionally popular "crime" agenda to encompass other pressing features of urban life. To do this, it was necessary to demonstrate that issues like vandalism and public drinking are somehow as "important" as burglary and drug abuse; thus the book's focus on the serious consequences of disorder for community stability. Because many disorder problems clearly are unresponsive to traditional criminal justice solutions, the book also called for thinking more expansively about what can be done to counter community decline, in particular by the police.

976 citations

Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this article, Kelling and urban anthropologist and lawyer Catherine Coles demonstrate that by controlling disorderly behavior in public spaces, we can create an environment where serious crime cannot flourish, and they explain how to adapt these effective methods for use in our own homes and communities.
Abstract: Based on a groundbreaking theory of crime prevention, this practical and empowering book shows how citizens, business owners, and police can work together to ensure the safety of their communities. George Kelling, one of America s leading criminologists, has proven the success of his method across the country, from the New York City subways to the public parks of Seattle. Here, Kelling and urban anthropologist and lawyer Catherine Coles demonstrate that by controlling disorderly behavior in public spaces, we can create an environment where serious crime cannot flourish, and they explain how to adapt these effective methods for use in our own homes and communities."

926 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: In this article, a systematic assessment of the performance of the police institution as a whole in preventing crime is provided, based on exhaustive research, interviews, and first hand observation in five countries-Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Japan, and the United States.
Abstract: Police do not and cannot prevent crime. This alarming thesis is explored by David Bayley, one of the most prolific and internationally renowned authorities on criminal justice and policing, in Police for the Future. Providing a systematic assessment of the performance of the police institution as a whole in preventing crime, the study is based on exhaustive research, interviews, and first hand observation in five countries-Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Japan, and the United States. It analyses what police are accomplishing in modern democratic societies, and asks whether police organizations are using their resources effectively to prevent crime. The book assesses the impediments to effective crime prevention, describes the most promising reforms currently being tested by the police, and analyses the choices that modern societies have with respect to creating truly effective police forces. It concludes with a blueprint for the creation of police forces that can live up to their promise to reduce crime and enhance public safety. Written for both the general public and the specialist in criminal justice, Police for the Future offers a unique multinational perspective on one of society's most basic institutions.

701 citations