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Book ChapterDOI

Comparing Wettability and Frictional Performance of Laser Micro-machined Discrete and Continuous Textures

01 Jan 2021-pp 185-192

Abstract: TiAl4V is used widely in aerospace and biomedical application due to its high specific strength and good bio-compatibility. Its poor tribological performance restricts usage for hip implant articulation. Various surface characteristics such as surface roughness and wettability affect the tribological behaviour of Ti6Al4V sliding. Surface texturing is the recent technique to modify the surface features and improve the wettability. This study aims to compare the wettability and coefficient of friction (CoF) of discrete and continuous texture under bio-lubricated condition. Dimple and crosshatch textures are fabricated using laser surface texturing (LST) technique. The geometrical parameters such as depth, pitch and area density have been kept the same. Wettability associated with both the textures are analysed by measuring surface contact angles using goniometer. Further, friction behaviour is evaluated for all the textured and non-textured surfaces under biological environment using reciprocating pin-on-disc tribometer. Results show a significant reduction in contact angle for crosshatch texture compared to dimple and non-textured surface. Also, both the texture reduced the friction by 24% compared to non-textured surface.
Topics: Surface roughness (60%), Tribometer (55%), Dimple (53%), Contact angle (52%)
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
Xuanyong Liu1, Paul K. Chu2, Chuanxian Ding1Institutions (2)
Abstract: Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, in order to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. This article reviews the various surface modification technologies pertaining to titanium and titanium alloys including mechanical treatment, thermal spraying, sol–gel, chemical and electrochemical treatment, and ion implantation from the perspective of biomedical engineering. Recent work has shown that the wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and biological properties of titanium and titanium alloys can be improved selectively using the appropriate surface treatment techniques while the desirable bulk attributes of the materials are retained. The proper surface treatment expands the use of titanium and titanium alloys in the biomedical fields. Some of the recent applications are also discussed in this paper.

2,730 citations


BookDOI
28 Jan 2005-
Abstract: Foreword.List of Contributors.1. Structure and Properties of Titanium and Titanium Alloys (M. Peters, et al.).2. Beta Titanium Alloys (G. Terlinde and G. Fischer).3. Orthorhombic Titanium Aluminides: Intermetallic with Improved Damage Tolerance (J. Kumpfert and C. Leyens).4. gamma-Titanium Aluminide Alloys: Alloy Design and Properties (F. Appel and M. Oehring).5. Fatigue of Titanium Alloys (L. Wagner and J.K. Bigoney).6. Oxidation and Protection of Titanium Alloys and Titanium Aluminides (C. Leyens).7. Titanium and Titanium Alloys - From Raw material to Semi-finished Products (H. Sibum).8. Fabrication of Titanium Alloys (M. Peters and C. Leyens).9. Investment Casting of Titanium (H.-P. Nicolai and Chr. Liesner).10. Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding of Titanium and Titanium Alloys (W. Beck).11. Forging of Titanium (G. Terlinde, et al.).12. Continuous Fiber Reinforced Titanium matrix Composites: Fabrication, Properties and Applications (C. Leyens, et al.).13. Titanium Alloys for Aerospace Applications (M. Peters, et al.).14. Production, Processing and Application of gamma(TiAl)-Based Alloys (H. Kestler and H. Clemens).15. Non-Aerospace Applications of Titanium and Titanium Alloys (M. Peters and C. Leyens).16. Titanium and its Alloys for Medical Applications (J. Breme, et al.).17. Titanium in Dentistry (J. Lindigkeit).18. Titanium in Automotive Production (O. Schauerte).19. Offshore Applications for Titanium Alloys (L. Lunde and M. Seiersten).Subject Index.

2,044 citations


Book ChapterDOI
Yuehua Yuan1, T. Randall Lee1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 2013-
TL;DR: This chapter highlights a variety of techniques that are commonly used to measure contact angles, including the conventional telescope-goniometer method, the Wilhelmy balance method, and the more recently developed drop-shape analysis methods.
Abstract: This chapter highlights a variety of techniques that are commonly used to measure contact angles, including the conventional telescope-goniometer method, the Wilhelmy balance method, and the more recently developed drop-shape analysis methods. The various applications and limitations of these techniques are described. Notably, studies of ultrasmall droplets on solid surfaces allow wetting theories to be tested down to the nanometer scale, bringing new insight to contact angle phenomena and wetting behavior.

1,138 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Lichao Gao1, Thomas J. McCarthy1Institutions (1)
03 Jun 2006-Langmuir
TL;DR: A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given.
Abstract: A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

662 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Izhak Etsion1, Yuri Kligerman1, G. HalperinInstitutions (1)
Abstract: An analytical model is developed to predict the relation between the opening force and operating conditions in a mechanical seal with laser textured microsurface structure in the form of micropores The model is valid for any desired shape of the micropores An optimization is performed for spherical shape micropores evenly distributed on one of the mating rings face to maximize the opening force and fluid film stiffness Results of a parametric study are presented showing the effect of the main design parameters on the seal performance Some results of an experimental investigation with water-lubricated seal rings are also shown and compared with the theoretical model Presented as a Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers paper at the ASME/STLE Tribology Conference in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 26–28, 1998

486 citations