scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book

Constitutional problems under Lincoln

01 Jan 1926-
About: The article was published on 1926-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 92 citations till now.
Citations
More filters
Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: A comparative performance analysis of artificial Neural networks, MDA and chance showed that artificial neural networks predict better in both training and testing phases, and are promising as an alternative to traditional analytic tools like MDA.
Abstract: Stimulated by recent high-profile incidents, concerns about business ethics have increased over the last decade. In response, research has focused on developing theoretical and empirical frameworks to understand ethical decision making. So far, empirical studies have used traditional quantitative tools, such as regression or multiple discriminant analysis (MDA), in ethics research. More advanced tools are needed. In this exploratory research, a new approach to classifying, categorizing and analyzing ethical decision situations is presented. A comparative performance analysis of artificial neural networks, MDA and chance showed that artificial neural networks predict better in both training and testing phases. While some limitations of this approach were noted, in the field of business ethics, such networks are promising as an alternative to traditional analytic tools like MDA.

217 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Guidelines handed down ad hoc by Congress are presented, and recommendations are made on how to proceed with the implementation of these guidelines.
Abstract: guidelines handed down ad hoc by Congress.

84 citations


Cites background from "Constitutional problems under Linco..."

  • ...Shaffer, Donald Robert....

    [...]

  • ...See Paul Finkelman, “Prelude to the Fourteenth Amendment: Black Legal Rights in the Antebellum North,” Rutgers LJ 17, (1985); Joanne Pope Melish, “The ‘Condition’ Debate and Racial Discourse in the Antebellum North,” Journal of the Early Republic, (1999); Gayle T Tate, “Free Black Resistance in the Antebellum Era, 1830 to 1860,” Journal of Black Studies, (1998)....

    [...]

  • ...Commission, United States Sanitary, and Roberts Bartholow....

    [...]

  • ...135 Kate Masur, ““A Rare Phenomenon of Philological Vegetation:” The Word “Contraband” and the Meanings of Emancipation in the United States,” Journal of American History 93, no. 4 (2007): 1050....

    [...]

  • ...Kaczorowski, Robert J. “To Begin the Nation Anew: Congress, Citizenship, and Civil Rights after the Civil War.”...

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of the state-of-the-art techniques to improve the quality of data collected from the Internet for the purpose of data augmentation.
Abstract: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .271

82 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper analyzed nearly two hundred federal district court decisions in cases involving the exercise of presidential power during the postwar era and found that judicial decision making appears to be dominated by the recognition of fixed rules, and that identification of the policy-making area alone constitutes an excellent predictor of case outcomes.
Abstract: Analysis of nearly two hundred federal district court decisions in cases involving the exercise of presidential power during the postwar era reveals two very different models of judicial decision making. In cases concerning presidential control of foreign and military policy, judicial decision making appears to be dominated by the recognition of fixed rules. So clear are these rules of deference to the executive that identification of the policy-making area alone constitutes an excellent predictor of case outcomes. By contrast, the statistical importance of such predictor variables as presidential prestige and whether the judge was appointed by the same president as that whose powers are at issue in the case suggests much greater relativism in the judicial response when the president is challenged as a domestic policymaker. As far as the federal district courts are concerned, presidential power over foreign and military affairs may aptly be called "the power to command," while the executive's power in dom...

75 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper analyzed original data tracking congressional committee investigations into alleged fraud, waste, and abuse by the executive branch between 1947 and 2004 and showed that divided government generates more and more intensive congressional investigations, but this relationship is contingent on partisan and temporal factors.
Abstract: Are congressional committee investigations into alleged executive-branch wrongdoing more common during periods of divided government? We analyze original data tracking congressional committee investigations into alleged fraud, waste, and abuse by the executive branch between 1947 and 2004. Countering David Mayhew's (1991) empirical finding, we show that divided government generates more and more-intensive congressional investigations, but this relationship is contingent on partisan and temporal factors. Our findings shed new light on the shifting dynamic between partisan institutional politics and congressional oversight.

45 citations