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Control, treatment, and rehabilitation of juvenile offenders

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Journal ArticleDOI
Jeffrey Fagan1
TL;DR: The Violent Juvenile Offender (VJO) Program as discussed by the authors was an experiment to test correctional interventions for chronically violent juvenile offenders in four sites tested an intervention model with four central elements: reintegration, case management, social learning processes, and a phased program of reentry from secure facilities to intensive supervision in the community.
Abstract: Violent juvenile crime has become the focus of policy debates on the philosophy of juvenile justice systems and the efficacy of rehabilitation. The Violent Juvenile Offender (VJO) Program was an experiment to test correctional interventions for chronically violent juvenile offenders. Programs in four sites tested an intervention model with four central elements: reintegration, case management, social learning processes, and a phased program of reentry from secure facilities to intensive supervision in the community. Recidivism and social outcomes of participants were compared with those of youths randomly assigned to mainstream juvenile corrections programs. Implementation of the experimental intervention varied by site; results suggest that treatment should be measured as a vector with several dimensions. Failure rates and arrest rates by time at risk for VJO youths were lower than those for control youths in two sites with strong implementation. Reintegration and transition strategies should be the focu...

79 citations


Cites background from "Control, treatment, and rehabilitat..."

  • ...The practice of'intervention and reintegration of youth released from institutions began in the early century when youth from the New York and Philadelphia Houses of Refuge were indentured upon release (Eldofonso and Hartinger, 1976; Lerman, 1984)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the relative effectiveness of twelve different juvenile court dispositions on eliminating recidivism among 2,038 juvenile offenders from four Illinois jurisdictions and found that an emphasis on community treatment should not be abandoned for a focus on proportionality and punishment.
Abstract: Conflicting results from research examining the effects of delinquent sentencing on recidivism have caused debate over what direction the juvenile court should take in treating delinquents. Correcting for several methodological problems of past research, this study examines the relative effectiveness of twelve different juvenile court dispositions on eliminating recidivism among 2,038 juvenile offenders from four Illinois jurisdictions. Results support the idea that an emphasis on community treatment should not be abandoned for an emphasis on proportionality and punishment, and that sentences of detention should be limited to relatively short terms to reduce probabilities of recidivism.

53 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The movement toward privatization in corrections is viewed either as a &dquo;feast&dqo; or a &dq;fiasco&dq; depending on the perspective of the observer as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The movement toward privatization in corrections is viewed either as a &dquo;feast&dquo; or a &dquo;fiasco&dquo; depending on the perspective of the observer. For elected officials seeking to sidestep the politically volatile issues inherent in contemporary corrections, and private corrections providers who see in the privatization movement an awesome amount of public funds which can be diverted their way, it is seen as a &dquo;feast.&dquo; Correctional scholars and informed observers who recall the abuses of the past when private firms leased inmate labor with little regard for health or safety of prisoners tend to see the movement as a potential &dquo;fiasco.&dquo; To be sure, private corrections has existed throughout correctional history, and most publicsupported correctional agencies have benefited from private programs such as the Salvation Army, YMCA/YWCA, Volunteers of America, Prison Fellowship, and a great deal more (c.f., Rothbart, 1984; Gest, 1984; Bartollas and Miller, 1978; Fox, 1985; Fox, 1977; Lindquist, 1980; Scheifer, 1970; Miller and Montilla, 1977; Killinger and Cromwell, 1978; Epstein and Rolfe, 1974; Scioli and Cook, 1976; Carleton, 1971). But the current movement toward privatization encompasses much more than mere auxillary or supplementary programs; the entire correctional enterprise including construction and management of correctional institutions is targeted for control by private corporate interests. That the trend to privatize much of the correctional enterprise has gained such popularity recently should be no surprise when one considers the political and economic realities of today’s government-run correctional services (Waxman, 1984; Gest, 1984).

15 citations


Cites background from "Control, treatment, and rehabilitat..."

  • ...Minimum standards for private corrections can be ignored or manipulated for self-interested purposes by private entities desiring standards which would be cost effective to implement (Eldefonso and Hartinger, 1976; Camp and Camp, 1984)....

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  • ...…for the services it offers, yet the emphasis on cost effectiveness as well as the significant amounts of money devoted to correctional processes bring the motives of a private corrections provider into question (Jayewardene and Talbot, 1982; Eldefonso and Hartinger, 1976; Wooden, 1976)....

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  • ...Profit versus Nonprofit Certainly, a private entity may state that it attempts to respond to the &dquo;need&dquo; for the services it offers, yet the emphasis on cost effectiveness as well as the significant amounts of money devoted to correctional processes bring the motives of a private corrections provider into question (Jayewardene and Talbot, 1982; Eldefonso and Hartinger, 1976; Wooden, 1976)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a systematic strength training and structured leisure counseling program was investigated to determine the effects on self-esteem, leisure attitudes, leisure behaviors, and muscular fitness of institutionalized juvenile delinquents.
Abstract: A systematic strength training and structured leisure counseling program was investigated to determine the effects on self-esteem, leisure attitudes, leisure behaviors, and muscular fitness of institutionalized juvenile delinquents. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: strength training and leisure counseling (STLC), strength training and informal discussion (STD), or a no-treatment control group (NT). The experimental groups met 3 times a week, 90 minutes per session for 7 weeks. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed that there were no significant differences among the three groups on measures of self-esteem, leisure attitudes, or leisure behaviors. Analysis of variance with repeated measures indicated that there were no significant differences between the STLC and STD groups on muscular fitness, although both had significant pre- to posttest gains. The STLC and STD groups rated their treatments high on an attitude toward treatment measure, but neither group was significantly mo...

14 citations