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Book ChapterDOI

Creative Writing and the Other Arts

About: The article was published on 2013-04-01. It has received None citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Creative writing & The arts.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Fiona Candlin1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the changing relationship of art practice to academic research in higher education since 1960 and argue that the emergence of practice-based PhDs can be interpreted as the logical consequence of critical, politically aware practices.
Abstract: This paper examines the changing relationship of art practice to academic research in higher education since 1960. Whereas art practice was often conceived of as divorced from any notion of academic or theoretical work in the post 1960 art school, by the 1990s the ground had changed to such a degree that it was possible to pursue doctoral study in art practice. This emergence of practice-based PhDs can be considered as part of a larger shift in art education and its acceptance of theory. On the one hand, the practice-based PhD could be interpreted as the logical consequence of critical, politically aware practices. On the other hand, the founding of the practice-based PhD can be connected to a series of educational reforms, particularly the introduction of the RAE, and the increasing need for departments to develop strategies for economic survival. In addition to tracing both the pedagogical, institutional and artistic legacy of practice based PhDs this paper focuses on the way in which a predominantly socialist commitment to integrated theory and practice meets with conservative educational reforms over the ground of the PhDs. I argue that this both highlights the institutional input into what art practice or indeed research is acknowledged to be and raises questions concerning the possibility of maintaining a critical art agenda.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the play's "Speaker" argues that an artist's writing is distinct from other forms of discourse about art precisely by virtue of its aesthetic dimension, which makes the arts inferior, and hence makes the task of defending aesthetic writing, which takes up the rest of this drama, all the more urgent.
Abstract: Developing the recent interest in ‘art-writing’, this one-act play explores one aspect of that area: specifically, an artist's writing. The monologue adapts Mieke Bal's notion of art history, written from the place of its objects, to invoke the idea of an artist's writing as writing by and as an artist. Contending that this is writing as aesthetic form, the play's ‘Speaker’ proposes that an artist's writing is distinct from other forms of discourse about art precisely by virtue of its aesthetic dimension. The speaker defines ‘aesthetic’ via Hegel's notion of the arts as a symbolic discourse in which the signifier is visible, and ‘motivated’ by its signified. In a Hegelian scheme, this makes the arts inferior, and hence makes the task of defending aesthetic writing, which takes up the rest of this drama, all the more urgent. The case is made with reference to pedagogic pragmatics, cultural politics, ethics and therapeutics: Barthes' ‘pleasure of the text’ – with which the text concludes.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mencia et al. as mentioned in this paper organized a roundtable discussion on the relevance of new technologies in the creation of language-mediated practice, viewing language in a very broad way using different modes: image-sound-text.
Abstract: On 12 July 2010 a group of artists, poets, writers, researchers and academics met up at Kingston University for a roundtable discussion convened by myself, Maria Mencia. Sitting around the tabl were Professor Jay David Bolter, director of the Wesley New Media Center and Wesley Chair of New Media at the Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr Serge Bouchardon (University of Technology of Compiegne, FR); Dr Scott Rettberg (Digital Cuture – UiB); Dr Maria Engberg (Blekinge Technical Institute, SWE); Talan Memmott (Blekinge Technical Institute, SWE); Dr Zuzana Husarova (Institute of World Literature, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia); Dr Laura Borras Castanyer (University of Barcelona SP); Kate Pullinger (De Montfort University, UK); Jorg Piringer (Independent, Austria); Dr Alexandra Saemmer (Paris 8-FR); Dr Thiresia Spilioti (Kingston University, UK); Dr Korina Giaxoglou (Kingston University, UK); Jerome Fletcher (University College Falmouth, UK); Prof. Martin Rieser (Institute of Creative Technologies and The Faculty of Art and Design at De Montfort, UK); Fiona Curran (Kingston University, UK); Judith Watts (Kingston University, UK) and Dr Maria Mencia (Kingston University, UK). There are a number of reasons why I wanted to organize this event. First, I wanted to use this workshop as a preliminary meeting in order to develop a ‘language-driven technology-mediated’ collaborative research practice, inviting scholars, writers, theoreticians and creative practitioners from Kingston University and other European universities to discuss the relevance of new technologies in the creation of language-mediated practice, viewing language in a very broad way using different modes: image-sound-text. Second, although most of the work presented at the roundtable is part of the curriculum at various universities, the mainstream literary institutions and traditional social sciences departments at universities are still not aware of the work produced in electronic literary and artistic practices. Thus, I thought this could offer an opportunity to gather together and to initiate a dialogue between writers, theoreticians and creative practitioners coming from a more print-based background, but who might also be considering the use of new technologies in their research practice, as well as international researchers who have migrated from more traditional print-based research practices to multimedial and interdisciplinary research methods that make use of computers, networks and mobile technologies. This would help to identify areas of overlap between different research practices, such as traditional humanities, practice-led new media research projects, and multimedial and interdisciplinary research methods, which make use of computers, mobile technologies and networks platforms. (M.Mencia)

1 citations