scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian–Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran

19 Apr 2011-Iranian Studies (Routledge)-Vol. 44, Iss: 3, pp 415-419
TL;DR: The decline and fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran, Parvaneh Pourshariati, London: I. B. Tauris, 2008, reprinted 2009, ISBN 13-978-1845116453,...
Abstract: Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian–Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran, Parvaneh Pourshariati, London: I. B. Tauris, 2008, reprinted 2009, ISBN 13-978-1845116453, ...
Citations
More filters
BookDOI
01 Jan 2017

113 citations


Cites background from "Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Em..."

  • ...This is what happened, for example, to King Hormozd IV (579–90), who was blinded following a palace coup set up to depose him and put his son Khusro II (591–628) on the throne (Pourshariati 2008: 124, 127, 409, 413)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the development of post-Iranian regimes through the dynamic interplay of nomadic and sedentary political institutions in the fourth through early seventh centuries.
Abstract: Contemporaneously with the fall and transformation of the Roman West, the Iranian Empire yielded its East to Hun—and later Turk—conquerors. This article traces the development of post-Iranian regimes through the dynamic interplay of nomadic and sedentary political institutions in the fourth through early seventh centuries. The conquerors adopted Iranian institutions, integrated the Iranian aristocracy, and presented themselves as the legitimate heirs of the kings of kings in a manner reminiscent of post-Roman rulers. At the same time, however, the Huns and the Turks retained the superior military resources of nomadic imperialism, included the Iranian East in trans-Eurasian networks, and distinguished themselves as ruling ethno-classes tied to the steppe. The resulting hybrid political culture came to be known as Turan.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss eventual Qurʾānic allusions to Zoroastrian texts by using the example of zamharīr (Q 76:13), which has frequently been interpreted as a punishment in hell.
Abstract: Abstract This article discusses eventual Qurʾānic allusions to Zoroastrian texts by using the example of zamharīr (Q 76:13). In the early tafsīr and ḥadīth-literature the term is most commonly understood as a piercing cold, which has frequently been interpreted as a punishment in hell. This idea, it is argued, has significant parallels to the concept of cold as a punishment in hell or to the absence of cold as a characteristic of paradise in the Avestan and Middle-Persian literature. In addition, Christian and Jewish texts that emphasize a similar idea and have not been discussed in research so far are brought into consideration. The article thus aims to contribute to the inclusion of Zoroastrian texts in locating the genesis of the Qurʾān – or early Islamic exegesis – in the “epistemic space ” of late antiquity.

32 citations


Cites background from "Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Em..."

  • ...Dazu grundlegend Pourshariati 2008. wäre demzufolge als eine indirekte und von dynamischen Aushandlungsprozessen charakterisierte Form der Kontrolle zu beschreiben....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2016-Iran
TL;DR: Situated on the north-eastern outskirts of the Iranian oecumene, Merv and its oasis (ancient Margiana) played an important role in the history of the ancient Iranian empires.
Abstract: Situated on north-eastern outskirts of the Iranian oecumene, Merv and its oasis (ancient Margiana) played an important role in the history of the ancient Iranian empires, not only for strat...

13 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...30 Pourshariati 2008: 257–63....

    [...]

References
More filters
BookDOI
01 Jan 2017

113 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the development of post-Iranian regimes through the dynamic interplay of nomadic and sedentary political institutions in the fourth through early seventh centuries.
Abstract: Contemporaneously with the fall and transformation of the Roman West, the Iranian Empire yielded its East to Hun—and later Turk—conquerors. This article traces the development of post-Iranian regimes through the dynamic interplay of nomadic and sedentary political institutions in the fourth through early seventh centuries. The conquerors adopted Iranian institutions, integrated the Iranian aristocracy, and presented themselves as the legitimate heirs of the kings of kings in a manner reminiscent of post-Roman rulers. At the same time, however, the Huns and the Turks retained the superior military resources of nomadic imperialism, included the Iranian East in trans-Eurasian networks, and distinguished themselves as ruling ethno-classes tied to the steppe. The resulting hybrid political culture came to be known as Turan.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss eventual Qurʾānic allusions to Zoroastrian texts by using the example of zamharīr (Q 76:13), which has frequently been interpreted as a punishment in hell.
Abstract: Abstract This article discusses eventual Qurʾānic allusions to Zoroastrian texts by using the example of zamharīr (Q 76:13). In the early tafsīr and ḥadīth-literature the term is most commonly understood as a piercing cold, which has frequently been interpreted as a punishment in hell. This idea, it is argued, has significant parallels to the concept of cold as a punishment in hell or to the absence of cold as a characteristic of paradise in the Avestan and Middle-Persian literature. In addition, Christian and Jewish texts that emphasize a similar idea and have not been discussed in research so far are brought into consideration. The article thus aims to contribute to the inclusion of Zoroastrian texts in locating the genesis of the Qurʾān – or early Islamic exegesis – in the “epistemic space ” of late antiquity.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2016-Iran
TL;DR: Situated on the north-eastern outskirts of the Iranian oecumene, Merv and its oasis (ancient Margiana) played an important role in the history of the ancient Iranian empires.
Abstract: Situated on north-eastern outskirts of the Iranian oecumene, Merv and its oasis (ancient Margiana) played an important role in the history of the ancient Iranian empires, not only for strat...

13 citations