scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Defining community policing in South Africa

01 Jan 1994-
About: The article was published on 1994-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 8 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Community policing.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
Bill Dixon1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the development of community policing in South Africa since the dying days of apartheid in the mid 1980s, taking Brogden's claim that community policing is "as American as cherry pie" as its starting point, and suggest that developments can usefully be seen in terms of the changing and contingent resolution of tensions between: competing civil and state-centred notions of Community policing; between reactive crime-fighting or law enforcement, and proactive community-based or problem-oriented, approaches to state policing; and, finally, between more or less aggressive
Abstract: Taking Brogden's (1999:167) claim that community policing is ‘as American as cherry pie’ as its starting point, the article traces the development of community policing in South Africa since the dying days of apartheid in the mid 1980s. For analytical purposes this period is divided up into three phases: prefiguration, transition and consolidation. Although state policing provided by the South African Police (later Police Service) is the main focus of the review, it is argued that developments can usefully be seen in terms of the changing and contingent resolution of tensions between: competing civil and state-centred notions of community policing; between reactive crime-fighting or law enforcement, and proactive community-based or problem-oriented, approaches to state policing; and, finally, between more or less aggressive accounts of state-centred community policing. An extended conclusion considers the current state of community policing in South Africa and suggests that, while it is yet to be...

30 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors apply the conceptual framework of policy transfer (referring to conscious efforts on the part of social agencies to export-import lessons from one locale to another) to the field of policing with a specific emphasis on South African police reform after 1990.
Abstract: In the contemporary era policy-making is increasingly being shaped by non-domestic influences and actors. The mobility of policy ideas and mechanisms across time and space provides a challenge: How best to conceptualise the routes and modes of travelling whereby ideas and instruments are transported from one location to another? Conceptual tools originally designed in public policy circles such as lesson-drawing, modelling, policy diffusion, policy transfer and convergence have more recently been introduced into criminological enquiries regarding the convergence of criminal justice policies. This thesis applies the conceptual framework of policy transfer (referring to conscious efforts on the part of social agencies to export-import lessons from one locale to another) to the field of policing with a specific emphasis on South African police reform after 1990. The central focus ofthis enquiry is the interplay between novel, often externally derived, ideas and practices with a national police force at a time of immense political transition. Selective aspects of South African police reform are explored with specific emphasis on how, in what way, and to what extent, local reform efforts have been influenced by global notions and practices of' good policing.' Three institutional conduits for reformist policing ideas are considered. In the first instance, the contribution of policing scholars, a knowledge-based community of some importance, to debates on the pathways for police reform are discussed with an emphasis on the theoretical and normative assumptions that have guided their analyses of a policing ethos and system beyond Apartheid. Secondly, the role of an interim policy mechanism, the National Police Board (created in terms of a peace agreement signed in 1991) in setting an agenda for police reform is considered. Thirdly, the discussion profiles the international development community as a constituency of importance in recent police reform efforts. The latter exploration proceeds through a case study method. Three distinct examples of donor aid in support of ~ institutional reform are described with particular reference to the paradigms invoked, the cultural entrepreneurs and policy networks involved, and the contextual factors that facilitated and/or ," constrained reformist efforts. A wide range of data collection methods were utilised during the course of the research. A I iterature review of contemporary debates on policy transfer, police and security sector reform in both mature and emerging democracies was undertaken. Furthermore, a wide range of primary documentary sources and various official policy documents were consulted. Face to face interviews with members of various policy constituencies also provided source material. Lastly, participant observation of policy structures and field notes compiled during evaluative research of a number of donor assisted projects provided contextual observations of importance to the analysis. This enquiry supports the conclusion that there is growing convergence in the language and practices associated with democratic police reform. Yet the di lemmas of policy transfer from North to South particularly (although not exclusively) in the context of aid packages are often underestimated. Local experiments suggest that whilst policy transfers can facilitate policy change, policies transferred all too easily become victims of domestic cOlltingencies. Empirical enquiries into the context, processes and outcomes associated with reformist interventions are necessary to sharpen our understanding of how exactly policy travels and to what local effect. Recent reform activity aimed at the South African Police illustrates the extent to which policy communities situated at the local, national and transnational level do not exist in isolation but rather stand in a complex and interactive relationship to one another.

7 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a framework is proposed that outlines a public participation strategy for community policing forums in order to facilitate and improve the involvement of community members in the affairs of the police.
Abstract: In any democratic dispensation, public participation is a widespread concern and highly topical to guide a discourse on openness, transparency and inclusiveness in governance. The South African Constitution (Section 215) and the South African Police Service Act 68 of 1995 (Section 19 to 21) stipulate that the notion of public participation in the South African Police Service (SAPS) are embedded in an approach focusing on community policing. This type of policing is generally more community centred and aim to encourage the active involvement of community members in the affairs of the police. The principle mechanism established for this purpose is community policing forums in all municipal areas in the country. The purpose of this article is to report on findings of an empirical investigation conducted in police stations within the Tlokwe Local Municipality. The aim of the survey was to assess the challenges for public participation within community policing forums. Based on these findings, a framework is proposed that outlines a public participation strategy for community policing forums in order to facilitate and improve the involvement of community members.

7 citations