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Design Guidelines for the use of Visualization Strategies in Health Education Materials

01 Jan 2010-
About: The article was published on 2010-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 4 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Visualization & Health education.
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Edward R. Tufte1
01 Jan 1990

3,631 citations


"Design Guidelines for the use of Vi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Clarity is not everything, but there is little without it” (Tufte, 1990, pp. 61 – 62)....

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  • ...Their multiplied smallness enforces local comparisons within our eye span, relying on an active eye to select and make contrasts rather than on bygone memories of images scattered over pages and pages” (Tufte, 1990, p. 33)....

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  • ...Once these information structures are deemphasized to where they are supportive of the actual content, the designs will become “so good that they are invisible” (Tufte, 1990, p. 33)....

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Journal Article

1,877 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...Among remaining adults, 22% had “Basic” health literacy, and 14% had “Below Basic” health literacy” (Kutner et al., 2006, p. v)....

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Journal ArticleDOI

1,778 citations


"Design Guidelines for the use of Vi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...A sure sign of a puzzle is that the graphic must be interpreted through a verbal rather than visual process” (Tufte, 1983, p. 153)....

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  • ...However, when a clear visual hierarchical order is established, “the translation of visual to verbal is quickly learned, automatic, and implicit – so that the visual image flows right through the verbal decoder initially necessary to understand the graphic” (Tufte, 1983, p. 153)....

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Book
01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide teaching strategies to aid in making self-help and self-management a reality for the patient with low literacy skills by using audiotapes and visual aids.
Abstract: It is estimated that 1 out of 5 American adults lacks the literacy skills needed to function effectively in todays society and as patients they present a challenge to health instruction This book provides teaching strategies to aid in making self-help and self-management a reality for the patient with low literacy skills The magnitude of the problem is explored and myths about illiteracy are exemplified Two chapters deal with comprehension of written materials from theory to practical proven testing techniques including the cloze technique and the word-recognition test Another chapter offers 2 formulas for testing the readability of written materials: the SMOG formula and the Fry index Once a problem is identified a 4-step teaching strategy gives tips on teaching the low-literacy patient For those pamphlets and booklets commonly given to patients suggestions for writing and rewriting to simplify the text are given along with examples of comprehension level The use of audiotapes for teaching is explored in depth for those who learn better by listening A chapter on the use of visuals stresses simplification to reduce the amount of text reading to emphasize instruction and to motivate and appropriate examples are given Where written material audiotapes and visuals are drafted and produced according to the guidelines in the book the last chapter is devoted to pretesting to determine whether intended concepts are coming through It defines the components of pretesting describes procedures discusses possible stages for production and provides examples of results Although the book is aimed at providing teaching methods for the low-literate patient the suggestions also apply to the learning disabled

1,678 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence suggests that optimal communication, patient satisfaction, and outcomes and the fewest interpreter errors occur when LEP patients have access to trained professional interpreters or bilingual providers.
Abstract: Twenty-one million Americans are limited in English proficiency (LEP), but little is known about the effect of medical interpreter services on health care quality. A systematic literature review was conducted on the impact of interpreter services on quality of care. Five database searches yielded 2,640 citations and a final database of 36 articles, after applying exclusion criteria. Multiple studies document that quality of care is compromised when LEP patients need but do not get interpreters. LEP patients’ quality of care is inferior, and more interpreter errors occur with untrained ad hoc interpreters. Inadequate interpreter services can have serious consequences for patients with mental disorders. Trained professional interpreters and bilingual health care providers positively affect LEP patients’ satisfaction, quality of care, and outcomes. Evidence suggests that optimal communication, patient satisfaction, and outcomes and the fewest interpreter errors occur when LEP patients have access to trained professional interpreters or bilingual providers.

1,083 citations


"Design Guidelines for the use of Vi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...(p. 294) Design Guidelines 13 Using children as translators can have particularly negative effects “including not interpreting perceived embarrassing but important clinical questions and frequent interpreter errors of potential clinical consequence” (Flores, 2005, p. 295)....

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  • ...According to Flores (2005), this can have the following adverse effects: “a lower likelihood of having medication side effects explained; a high risk of interpretation errors, omissions, distortions, redundancy, and irrelevant questions; a greater likelihood of committing interpreter errors with…...

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  • ...In one study by Flores (2005) that reviewed a large variety of literature discussing the effects of language interpreter services on the overall quality of patient care, patients who were unable to receive these services often “have a worse understanding of their diagnosis and treatment; more often…...

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