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Journal ArticleDOI

Design of variable speed induction motor drive with a current-fed inverter

01 Nov 1980-Electric Machines and Power Systems (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 5, Iss: 6, pp 523-542
TL;DR: In this paper, a closed-loop speed control scheme with reversing and regenerating capability for a squirrel-cage induction motor is described, which makes use of a fully-controlled bridge for a.c. to d.c conversion, a currend-fed inverter for generation of variable frequency a.k.a. supply for motor and an analogue tachogenerator for speed feedback signal.
Abstract: A closed-loop speed control scheme with reversing and regenerating capability for a squirrel-cage induction motor is described. The scheme makes use of a fully-controlled bridge for a.c. to d.c. conversion, a currend-fed inverter for generation of variable frequency a.c. supply for motor and an analogue tachogenerator for speed feedback signal. The current-reference signal is generated by a novel slip calculator. This paper describes the slip calculator and the design of controllers based on an approximate model of motor. Experimental results validating the methods used for design of controllers are also presented.
Citations
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
14 Aug 1989
TL;DR: The transfer function is used in the design of the speed controller for a closed-loop drive using known control system techniques and its parameters and the operating slip frequency are described.
Abstract: Induction motors fed by thyristorized current-fed inverters are finding increasing application as variable speed drives. The transfer function approach is quite useful in the analysis and design of such drives. A method for obtaining the transfer function of a current-fed induction motor in terms of its parameters and the operating slip frequency is described. The transfer function is used in the design of the speed controller for a closed-loop drive using known control system techniques. >
References
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Book
01 Dec 1965

205 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an improved method of obtaining the slip information without the use of rotary transducers of any kind was discussed, by sensing the electrical quantities applied to the motor and performing simple signal processing operations on the sensed quantities, an analog signal proportional to the slip level was derived and used in motor control functions.
Abstract: In certain types of adjustable frequency induction motor drives, optimal control of the motor can be best implemented by using information on the motor slip frequency. Unfortunately, this generally requires the use of an electromechanical speed transducer coupled to the shaft. The presence of this transducer spoils the general characteristics of ruggedness and mechanical simplicity typical of an ac drive. This paper discusses an improved method of obtaining the slip information without the use of rotary transducers of any kind. By sensing the electrical quantities applied to the motor (voltages, currents, and phases) and by performing simple signal processing operations on the sensed quantities, an analog signal proportional to the slip level is derived and used in motor control functions.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1973
TL;DR: In this paper, a cage induction motor is fed with a quasi-square-wave current, and the motor terminal voltage is approximately sinusoidal under normal operating conditions, based on the assumption that the motor resistances and inductances do not change with frequency.
Abstract: The paper shows that, if a cage induction motor is fed with a quasi-square-wave current, the motor terminal voltage is approximately sinusoidal under normal operating conditions. A simple analytical approach, based on the assumption that the motor resistances and inductances do not change with frequency, is shown to describe adequately the motor-terminal voltage. The quasi-square-wave-current supply is derived by modification of a known variable d.c.-link-voltage invertor. These modifications result in numerous advantages. The modified invertor is capable of regeneration back into the mains supply, has only 12 noninvertor-grade thyristors, and is undamaged by short-circuiting of the output terminals or by misfire of the output thyristors. Overall, the invertor lends itself to a simpler electrical and mechanical arrangement.

77 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 1970

47 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a dynamic linearized model and the associated equivalent circuit for a controlled current induction motor are presented and the controlled variables of interest are identified and open-loop transfer functions are tabulated.

18 citations