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Journal ArticleDOI

Diagnosis of mungbean (Vigna radiate) bradyrhizobia isolated from Kyushu Island of Japan based on whole cellular fatty acid analysis

01 Oct 2005-Journal of The Faculty of Agriculture Kyushu University (Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University)-Vol. 50, Iss: 2, pp 489-496

TL;DR: This study evaluated the fatty acid profiles of 13 strains of MAFF collections and 36 strains collected from Fukuoka, Saga, Oita, Kumamoto and Kagoshima Prefecture belonging to unknown species of Bradyrhizobium to find the dominant five distinct clusters formed.

AbstractPrevious studies have already reported that cellular fatty acid analysis is a useful taxonomic tool for classifying and identifying Bradyrhizobium strains. In this study, the fatty acid profiles of 13 strains of MAFF collections and 36 strains collected from Fukuoka, Saga, Oita, Kumamoto and Kagoshima Prefecture belonging to unknown species of Bradyrhizobium were evaluated. Total 1 1 fatty acids were identified and qualitative and quantitative variations of fatty acid compositions were observed. Data of fatty acid compositions obtained from each strain was statistically investigated by PCA and PCGMA clustering. Statistical analysis showed that the dominant five distinct clusters were formed and conveniently grouped as FAG-1 to FAG-V. FAG-1 and FAG-ll strains were closely relationships to the strain of B. elkanii. FAG-HI and FAG-V strains were relevant to the strain of B. japonicum. On the other hand, FAG-IV strains isolated from mungbean root nodules were clustered wlth B. japo?~icum FAG-EI and FAG-V but obviously different compositions of fatty acid and distinguishable to these two subgrou ps.

Topics: Fatty acid (57%), Bradyrhizobium (52%)

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The slow-growing, non-acid-producing root nodule bacteria of leguminous plants should be separated from the fast- growing, acid-producing strains and placed in a new genus, and the name proposed is Bradyrhizobium.
Abstract: Recent data indicate that the slow-growing, non-acid-producing root nodule bacteria of leguminous plants should be separated from the fast-growing, acid-producing strains and placed in a new genus. The separation is warranted by numerical taxonomy, deoxyribonucleic acid base ratio determinations, nucleic acid hybridization, ribosomal ribonucleic acid cistron similarities, serology, composition of extracellular gum, carbohydrate utilization and metabolism, bacteriophage and antibiotic susceptibilities, protein composition, and types of intracellular inclusion bodies in the bacteroid forms. The name proposed for the new genus is Bradyrhizobium. The type species of the genus is B. japonicum (Buchanan 1980) comb. nov. (basonym: Rhizobium japonicum Buchanan 1980), the type strain of which is ATCC 10324.

527 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It seems likely that the ability to form legume nodules was not present in the common ancestor of all rhizobia but that the nodulation genes were transferred between phylogenetically distinct bacteria, so that the phylogeny of nodulations genes will probably differ from that of the bacteria that carry them.
Abstract: SUMMARY Rhizobia are the bacteria that form nitrogen-fixing nodules on legumes. The current list of four rhizobium genera and 17 species is reviewed, with some comments on likely future developments in the taxonomy. Sequences of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU or 16S rRNA) support the well-established subdivision of rhizobia into three genera: Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium and Azorhizobium. These all lie within the alpha subdivision of the Proteabacteria, but on quite distinct branches, each of which also includes many bacterial species that are not rhizobia. Rhizobium, by this definition, is still broad and polyphyletic, so there have recently been suggestions that this genus should be split into four genera. SSU sequences may be the best phylogenetic tool we have, but they are not an infallible guide to evolutionary relationships, particularly among closely related species: slow evolution, recombination, intraspecinc variation and even intragenomic heterogeneity are all limitations that can be illustrated by examples from the rhizobia. It seems likely that the ability to form legume nodules was not present in the common ancestor of all rhizobia but that the nodulation genes were transferred between phylogenetically distinct bacteria, so that the phylogeny of nodulation genes will probably differ from that of the bacteria that carry them. Nitrogen fixation genes are often linked to nodulation genes, but they need not have the same evolutionary history.

323 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The RFLP and DNA homology analyses indicate that bradyrhizobia effective with peanut are genetically diverse and consist of at least three different species.
Abstract: Symbiotic gene diversity and other measures of genetic diversity were examined in Bradyrhizobium isolates that form an effective symbiosis with peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Initially, restriction fra...

59 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results indicate that Thai soybean bradyrhizobia are distantly related to B. japonicum and B. elkanii.
Abstract: To determine the taxonomic relationship between Thai soybean bradyrhizobia and soybean bradyrhizobia from other regions, a total of 62 Bradyrhizobium strains were isolated in Thailand. The genetic ...

34 citations


"Diagnosis of mungbean (Vigna radiat..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...elkonbii identified by this experiment were confirmed using RFLP analysis based on PCR amplified nod genes described by Yokoyama et al. (1996)....

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