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Die arabischen, persischen und türkischen Handschriften der Kaiserlich-königlichen Hofbibliothek zu Wien ...

About: The article was published on 1967-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 13 citations till now.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 1556-1557 a Hungarian convert to Islam by the name of Murad b. Abdul lah, otherwise serving as an imperial interpreter (dragoman, terc?m?n) for the Ottoman Porte, penned a polemical treatise entitled The Guide for One s Turning towards God as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In 1556-1557 a Hungarian convert to Islam by the name of Murad b. Abdul lah, otherwise serving as an imperial interpreter (dragoman, terc?m?n) for the Ottoman Porte, penned a polemical treatise entitled The Guide for One s Turning towards God. In it, he introduces the essentials of the Muslim faith by arguing Islam's superiority to Christianity and Judaism. In the conclusion to his work Murad states that by writing this treatise he hopes to bring about the conversion of Christians from different parts of Europe (Firengist?n) and secure the salvation of their souls by bringing them to Islam. With this goal in mind, ten years after completing the text in Ottoman Turkish Murad trans lated it into Latin, inscribing the translation onto the margins of the Ottoman text so that Christians in the remotest parts of Firengist?n could understand it and be drawn to the true faith. To this curious bilingual work he then added an autobiographical section, in both languages, describing the process of his own conversion to Islam.x To a student of early modern European history this story sounds ordinary enough: polemical autobiographical narratives of conversion from one Chris tian denomination to another were a staple of the propaganda wars waged among states and religious factions in the era of confessional polarization that swept across Christendom in the sixteenth century.2 From the standpoint

71 citations

MonographDOI
17 Oct 2019
TL;DR: In this article, Peacock offers a new understanding of the crucial but neglected period in Anatolian history, that of Mongol domination, between c. 1240 and 1380, and integrates the study of Anatolia with that of the broader Islamic world, shedding new light on this crucial turning point in the history of the Middle East.
Abstract: From a Christian, Greek- and Armenian-speaking land to a predominantly Muslim and Turkish speaking one, the Islamisation of medieval Anatolia would lay the groundwork for the emergence of the Ottoman Empire as a world power and ultimately the modern Republic of Turkey. Bringing together previously unpublished sources in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, Peacock offers a new understanding of the crucial but neglected period in Anatolian history, that of Mongol domination, between c. 1240 and 1380. This represents a decisive phase in the process of Islamisation, with the popularisation of Sufism and the development of new forms of literature to spread Islam. This book integrates the study of Anatolia with that of the broader Islamic world, shedding new light on this crucial turning point in the history of the Middle East.

37 citations

Book
26 Apr 2018
TL;DR: The authors investigates the politics of identity of the Muslims in Late Medieval Christian Iberia (Mudejars) and argues that alongside the primary aim of the polemics, which was to refute the views of their religious opponents, the discourses against the Christians and the Jews in Mudejar treatises were also a tool to advance Islamic knowledge and to strengthen the government and social cohesion of their communities.
Abstract: This dissertation investigates the politics of identity of the Muslims in Late Medieval Christian Iberia (Mudejars). Mudejars had to endure the pressure exerted by the Christian majority society and also the criticism from their co-religionists in Muslim lands who contested their exceptional subjugation to Christian rulers and occasionally asked them to emigrate to the Islamic territories. In addition, Mudejars were in direct competition with the Jewish minorities for the favours of their Christian lords. The central question addressed in this study is how Mudejars articulated notions of identity and religious authority in relation to the Christians and the Jews, and importantly also to other Muslims, in their literature of religious polemics against the Christians and the Jews preserved in Arabic and in Aljamiado (Spanish in Arabic characters) codices. I argue that alongside the primary aim of the polemics, which was to refute the views of their religious opponents, the discourses against the Christians and the Jews in Mudejar treatises were also a tool to advance Islamic knowledge and to strengthen the government and social cohesion of their communities. My analysis of this literature takes an interdisciplinary approach whose purpose is to counterbalance the often biased outsider views found in the contemporary Christian sources which disregard the agency of the members of these Muslim minority communities in constructing their self-image and their share in the shaping of interreligious Iberian narratives.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that every such work, however inadequate and inaccurate it may be in detail, is itself a historical fact of singular importance, and is best understood when considered with its fellows in their mutual complementary relationship throughout a total situation rather than being merely confronted with them on the particulars.
Abstract: Historiography .. . in its prejudices and its assumptions, in its omissions no less than in its contents ... is the reflection of the inconstant human situation, and even where it is least informative it supplies us with data which no explicit statement could convincingly express, ard which, perhaps, are as valuable to the understanding of the past as the dates and the deeds. Every such work, therefore, however inadequate and inaccurate it may be in detail, is itself a historical fact of singular importance, and is best understood when considered with its fellows in their mutual complementary relationship throughout a total situation rather than being merely confronted with them on the particulars.'

20 citations