scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Proceedings ArticleDOI

DISS-X: Use of two MAC protocols with DISSense for low Power consumption and emergency event detection

TL;DR: DISS-X is a modified version of DISSense that uses two Medium Access Control protocols, namely CSMA/CA and XMAC one after the other that aims at catering the applications related to physical environment monitoring in the Building Management Industry.
Abstract: This paper aims at presenting DISS-X, a modified version of DISSense[1] (An adaptive ultra-low power communication protocol for Wireless sensor networks (WSN's)) that uses two Medium Access Control protocols, namely CSMA/CA and XMAC one after the other. It aims at catering the applications related to physical environment monitoring in the Building Management Industry. DISS-X is similar to DISSense with the fact that it provides both the data accumulation and data dissemination services. The qualities of DISSENSE like adaptable active cycle period for reducing the overall duty cycle and reliable data delivery to the sink have been maintained. This paper aims at modifying the medium access methodology of DISSense by replacing CSMA/CA MAC with X-MAC[2] (a periodic preamble based approach) during the Data Collection Interval of active period of DISSense. Also, other drawbacks of DISSense like: i) lack of capability for critical applications like safety and security and ii) the problem of being lesser flexible in context of the active period for parent and child nodes have been addressed and an attempt to find a feasible solution for the same has been made in DISS-X.
References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This survey presents a comprehensive review of the recent literature since the publication of a survey on sensor networks, and gives an overview of several new applications and then reviews the literature on various aspects of WSNs.

5,626 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: S-MAC as discussed by the authors is a medium access control protocol designed for wireless sensor networks, which uses three novel techniques to reduce energy consumption and support self-configuration, including virtual clusters to auto-sync on sleep schedules.
Abstract: This paper proposes S-MAC, a medium-access control (MAC) protocol designed for wireless sensor networks. Wireless sensor networks use battery-operated computing and sensing devices. A network of these devices will collaborate for a common application such as environmental monitoring. We expect sensor networks to be deployed in an ad hoc fashion, with individual nodes remaining largely inactive for long periods of time, but then becoming suddenly active when something is detected. These characteristics of sensor networks and applications motivate a MAC that is different from traditional wireless MACs such as IEEE 802.11 in almost every way: energy conservation and self-configuration are primary goals, while per-node fairness and latency are less important. S-MAC uses three novel techniques to reduce energy consumption and support self-configuration. To reduce energy consumption in listening to an idle channel, nodes periodically sleep. Neighboring nodes form virtual clusters to auto-synchronize on sleep schedules. Inspired by PAMAS, S-MAC also sets the radio to sleep during transmissions of other nodes. Unlike PAMAS, it only uses in-channel signaling. Finally, S-MAC applies message passing to reduce contention latency for sensor-network applications that require store-and-forward processing as data move through the network. We evaluate our implementation of S-MAC over a sample sensor node, the Mote, developed at University of California, Berkeley. The experiment results show that, on a source node, an 802.11-like MAC consumes 2–6 times more energy than S-MAC for traffic load with messages sent every 1–10s.

5,354 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Nov 2002
TL;DR: S-MAC uses three novel techniques to reduce energy consumption and support self-configuration, and applies message passing to reduce contention latency for sensor-network applications that require store-and-forward processing as data move through the network.
Abstract: This paper proposes S-MAC, a medium-access control (MAC) protocol designed for wireless sensor networks Wireless sensor networks use battery-operated computing and sensing devices A network of these devices will collaborate for a common application such as environmental monitoring We expect sensor networks to be deployed in an ad hoc fashion, with individual nodes remaining largely inactive for long periods of time, but then becoming suddenly active when something is detected These characteristics of sensor networks and applications motivate a MAC that is different from traditional wireless MACs such as IEEE 80211 in almost every way: energy conservation and self-configuration are primary goals, while per-node fairness and latency are less important S-MAC uses three novel techniques to reduce energy consumption and support self-configuration To reduce energy consumption in listening to an idle channel, nodes periodically sleep Neighboring nodes form virtual clusters to auto-synchronize on sleep schedules Inspired by PAMAS, S-MAC also sets the radio to sleep during transmissions of other nodes Unlike PAMAS, it only uses in-channel signaling Finally, S-MAC applies message passing to reduce contention latency for sensor-network applications that require store-and-forward processing as data move through the network We evaluate our implementation of S-MAC over a sample sensor node, the Mote, developed at University of California, Berkeley The experiment results show that, on a source node, an 80211-like MAC consumes 2-6 times more energy than S-MAC for traffic load with messages sent every 1-10 s

5,117 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: It is demonstrated through implementation and evaluation in a wireless sensor testbed that X-MAC's shortened preamble approach significantly reduces energy usage at both the transmitter and receiver, reduces per-hop latency, and offers additional advantages such as flexible adaptation to both bursty and periodic sensor data sources.
Abstract: In this paper we present X-MAC, a low power MAC protocol for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Standard MAC protocols developed for duty-cycled WSNs such as BMAC, which is the default MAC protocol for TinyOS, employ an extended preamble and preamble sampling. While this “low power listening” approach is simple, asynchronous, and energy-efficient, the long preamble introduces excess latency at each hop, is suboptimal in terms of energy consumption, and suffers from excess energy consumption at nontarget receivers. X-MAC proposes solutions to each of these problems by employing a shortened preamble approach that retains the advantages of low power listening, namely low power communication, simplicity and a decoupling of transmitter and receiver sleep schedules. We demonstrate through implementation and evaluation in a wireless sensor testbed that X-MAC’s shortened preamble approach significantly reduces energy usage at both the transmitter and receiver, reduces per-hop latency, and offers additional advantages such as flexible adaptation to both bursty and periodic sensor data sources.

1,786 citations


"DISS-X: Use of two MAC protocols wi..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...This approach is a slightly modified X-MAC protocol so that it can be made suitable with DISSense....

    [...]

  • ...And it clearly shows that X-MAC fairs better than CSMA/CA in terms of duty cycle....

    [...]

  • ...Under this situation, the nodes send a emergency packet containing the address of the target and the detected data using X-MAC to their respective last known parent and immediate neighbors....

    [...]

  • ...But, out of all these MAC protocols X-MAC is found to have the best balance in terms of low power consumption, reliability and latency....

    [...]

  • ...During the DCI, we have proposed the idea of using the X-MAC protocol....

    [...]

Proceedings ArticleDOI
31 Oct 2006
TL;DR: X-MAC as mentioned in this paper employs a shortened preamble approach that retains the advantages of low power listening, namely low power communication, simplicity and a decoupling of transmitter and receiver sleep schedules.
Abstract: In this paper we present X-MAC, a low power MAC protocol for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Standard MAC protocols developed for duty-cycled WSNs such as BMAC, which is the default MAC protocol for TinyOS, employ an extended preamble and preamble sampling. While this "low power listening" approach is simple, asynchronous, and energy-efficient, the long preamble introduces excess latency at each hop, is suboptimal in terms of energy consumption, and suffers from excess energy consumption at nontarget receivers. X-MAC proposes solutions to each of these problems by employing a shortened preamble approach that retains the advantages of low power listening, namely low power communication, simplicity and a decoupling of transmitter and receiver sleep schedules. We demonstrate through implementation and evaluation in a wireless sensor testbed that X-MAC's shortened preamble approach significantly reduces energy usage at both the transmitter and receiver, reduces per-hop latency, and offers additional advantages such as flexible adaptation to both bursty and periodic sensor data sources.

1,654 citations