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Journal ArticleDOI

Disseminated Histoplasmosis, Pulmonary Tuberculosis, and Cytomegalovirus Disease in a Renal Transplant Recipient after Infection with SARS-CoV-2

TL;DR: It is recommended that in RTR post-COVID-19, the immunosuppression regimen should be gradually reinstated along with strict vigilance in observing for highly prevalent coinfections (TB, HP, and CMV).
Abstract: Introduction Infection with SARS-CoV-2 increases the risk of acute graft dysfunction (AGD) in renal transplant recipients (RTR), and the risk of concurrently presenting with opportunistic infections is also increased. There is no current consensus on the management of immunosuppression during SARS-CoV-2 infection in RTR. Case Presentation. A 35-year-old male RTR from a living related donor presented with SARS-CoV-2 infection (January 2021). Two months later, despite alterations to his immunosuppression regimen (tacrolimus (TAC) was reduced by 50%, and the mycophenolic acid (MMF) was suspended with the remission of symptoms), the patient presented with pulmonary tuberculosis, pneumonia due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonitis, and histoplasmosis (HP). Management was initiated with antituberculosis medications, ganciclovir, antibiotics, and liposomal amphotericin B, and the immunosuppressants were suspended, yet the patient's evolution was catastrophic and the outcome fatal. Conclusion We recommend that in RTR post-COVID-19, the immunosuppression regimen should be gradually reinstated along with strict vigilance in observing for highly prevalent coinfections (TB, HP, and CMV).

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is inferred that epidemics are already growing exponentially in multiple major cities of China with a lag time behind the Wuhan outbreak of about 1–2 weeks, and that other major Chinese cities are probably sustaining localised outbreaks.

3,938 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Highlights include advances in molecular and immunologic diagnostics, improved understanding of diagnostic thresholds, optimized methods of prevention, advances in the use of novel antiviral therapies and certain immunosuppressive agents, and more savvy approaches to treatment resistant/refractory disease.
Abstract: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains one of the most common infections after solid organ transplantation, resulting in significant morbidity, graft loss, and occasional mortality. Management of CMV varies considerably among transplant centers. A panel of experts on CMV and solid organ transplant was convened by The Infectious Diseases Section of The Transplantation Society to develop evidence and expert opinion-based consensus guidelines on CMV management including diagnostics, immunology, prevention, treatment, drug resistance, and pediatric issues.

1,351 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Twenty-three evidence-based recommendations about diagnostic testing for latent tuberculosis infection, pulmonary tuberculosis, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are provided and six of the recommendations are strong, whereas the remaining 17 are conditional.
Abstract: Background Individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may develop symptoms and signs of disease (tuberculosis disease) or may have no clinical evidence of disease (latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI]). Tuberculosis disease is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet many questions related to its diagnosis remain. Methods A task force supported by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America searched, selected, and synthesized relevant evidence. The evidence was then used as the basis for recommendations about the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and LTBI in adults and children. The recommendations were formulated, written, and graded using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Results Twenty-three evidence-based recommendations about diagnostic testing for latent tuberculosis infection, pulmonary tuberculosis, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are provided. Six of the recommendations are strong, whereas the remaining 17 are conditional. Conclusions These guidelines are not intended to impose a standard of care. They provide the basis for rational decisions in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling unique individual clinical circumstances.

632 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Diagnostic, treatment and outcome details of 49 COVID-19 patients with concurrent or previous tuberculosis from 8 countries show varied clinical profiles.
Abstract: Diagnostic, treatment and outcome details of 49 COVID-19 patients with concurrent or previous tuberculosis from 8 countries show varied clinical profileshttps://bit.ly/369ZGGu

286 citations