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Journal ArticleDOI

Dreaming Across Boundaries: The Interpretation of Dreams in Islamic Lands

31 Jan 2010-Religion (No longer published by Elsevier)-Vol. 40, Iss: 1, pp 67-68
About: This article is published in Religion.The article was published on 2010-01-31. It has received 15 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Interpretation (philosophy).
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the representation of the monarch in Abdellah Taïa's novel Le Jour du Roi (2010) and Fouad Laroui's \"Tu n'as rien compris à Hassan II\" (2004), focusing on the act of reading and the historical context of Hassan II's reign.
Abstract: ABSTRACT:This article discusses the representation of the monarch in Abdellah Taïa's novel Le Jour du Roi (2010) and Fouad Laroui's \"Tu n'as rien compris à Hassan II\" (2004), focusing on the act of reading and the historical context of Hassan II's reign. A close reading of Taïa's novel and Laroui's short story will reveal narrative strategies used to fictionalize sovereignty. Laroui uses humor and irony to criticize the regime of Hassan II, while Taïa uses oneiric elements to capture the arbitrary nature of monarchy and the notion of absolute royal power as theorized by Achille Mbembe. Both writers criticize Hassan II's repressive reign and assert their own sovereignty as writers, while discrediting an oppressive political regime. Both authors write about their native Morocco from a position of exile (Paris and Amsterdam). This geographical distance shapes their understanding of their roles as writers and educators who reveal and criticize sovereignty and abuse of power.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors analyze the narrative functions of scent in the book of travels and reveal how olfaction was implicated in the Ottoman religious and social imaginary, where scent plays a key narrative purpose, once in the context of conversing with the sacred dead in a dream, and on three occasions during visits to the caves of various Islamicate religious figures.
Abstract: ABSTRACT Standing in as a monumental work of Ottoman first-person prose that is without precedent, the Seyāḥatnāme (“Book of Travels”), at once a travelogue as well as a literary composition, is an ideal source for conducting a sensate history of Ottoman-Islamic society in the 17th century. Using characteristic flair and imagination, its author Evliyā Çelebi relates a number of fantastical anecdotes where scent plays a key narrative purpose, once in the context of conversing with the sacred dead in a dream, and on three occasions during visits to the caves of various Islamicate religious figures from the past. This paper will analyze these anecdotes to determine the narrative functions of scent in the text and in doing so tease out how olfaction was implicated in the Ottoman religious and social imaginary.
DOI
02 Jan 2022
TL;DR: In this paper , the author's double, the Fıriyáq, holds a series of jobs that parodically stand in for al-Shidyáq's own employments.
Abstract: ABSTRACT In Aḥmad Fāris al-Shidyāq’s 1855 semiautobiographical picaresque al-Sāq ʿalā al-sāq (Leg Over Leg), the author’s double, the Fāriyāq, holds a series of jobs that parodically stand in for al-Shidyāq’s own employments. This article addresses the Fāriyāq’s career as an oneiromancer, reading it as an allegory of al-Shidyāq’s work as a Bible translator for European Protestant missionaries. By representing the muʿarrib (translator into Arabic) as the muʿabbir (dream interpreter), I argue, al-Shidyāq places the translator in a genealogy of professional interpreters, inheriting the tradition of early-modern Ottoman court interpreters who wielded the power of expertise against the social and economic power of their patrons. At a moment of historical shift from circuits of scribal patronage to a more horizontal print market, al-Shidyāq removes the oneiromantic tradition from its hierarchical patron economy and parodically reinscribes it in an emergent print culture, initiating an anonymous yet intimate community of laughter.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Barhebraeus as mentioned in this paper investigates which animals sleep and wake in general and which, in addition, are also able to dream, according to Barhebroyo, the famous Syrian Orthodox polymath and theologian.
Abstract: This paper investigates which animals sleep and wake in general and which, in addition, are also able to dream, according to Barhebraeus (Bar ʿEbroyo, Arabic: Ibn al-ʿIbrī, 1226-1286 CE), the famous Syrian Orthodox polymath and theologian. Attention is also given to the authors who are his primary sources, namely, Avicenna and Aristotle. Parallel examples include Albert the Great as another author who is dependent on some of the same sources and Pliny the Elder as a Latin author without Arabic influences. Roughly, Avicenna and Barhebraeus can be understood as allowing for or stating the observation of far more dreaming animals than Aristotle himself did explicitly, while Albert allows for even fewer. The question of why on this matter Barhebraeus relied primarily on these two authors as his sources, though not on other post-Avicennan Arabic authors as he did in many of his other philosophical and even theological works, will also be briefly discussed. This select reliance could be connected to a historical change in the topics dealt with in the scientific curriculum, with the lack of coverage of zoological topics by Barhebraeus’s favorite source authors being one of the reasons that led him to rely on the older texts by Avicenna and Aristotle. However, this cannot be generalized as a rule, as there are at least two contrary cases in Barhebraeus’s works on physiognomics where he has had recourse to an older text rather than a treatise by one of his otherwise preferred source authors.
References
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Dissertation
06 Jun 2014
TL;DR: The production and history of the talismanic scroll as a medium through a Fatimid, Ayyubid, and Mamluk historical periods is discussed in this paper.
Abstract: The following study traces the production and history of the talismanic scroll as a medium through a Fatimid, Ayyubid, and Mamluk historical periods. My dissertation understands the protocol of manufacturing and utilizing talismanic scrolls. The dissertation is a study of the Qur’an, prayers and illustrations of these talismanic works. I begin by investigating a theory of the occult the medieval primary sources of the Neo-platonic tenth century Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ and al-Bunī (d.1225). I establish that talismans are generally categorized as science (‘ilm). Next, a dynastic spotlight of talismanic scrolls creates a chronological framework for the dissertation. The Fatimid talismanic scrolls and the Ayyubid pilgrimage scrolls are both block-printed and are placed within the larger conceptual framework of pilgrimage and devotion. The two unpublished Mamluk scrolls from Dar Al-Athar Al-Islamiyyah are long beautiful handwritten scrolls that provide a perspective on how the occult is part of the daily life of the practitioner in the medieval Islamic culture. Through an in depth analysis of the written word and images, I establish that textually and visually there is a template for the creation of these sophisticated scrolls. Lastly, I discuss the efficacy of these scrolls, I use theories of linguistic anthropology and return to the Islamic primary sources to establish that there is a language of the occult and there are people that practiced the occult. The word of God and the Qurʾān empower the scrolls I studied. As for the people who practiced the occult, I turn to the tenth century Ibn al-Nadim and

44 citations

Dissertation
02 Aug 2013
Abstract: Based on a broad survey of the reception of Firdausī‘s Shāhnāma in medieval times, this dissertation argues that Firdausī‘s oeuvre was primarily perceived as a book of wisdom and advice for kings and courtly élites. The medieval reception of the Shāhnāma is clearly manifested in the comments of medieval authors about Firdausī and his work, and in their use of the Shāhnāma in the composition of their own works. The production of ikhtiyārāt-i Shāhnāmas (selections from the Shāhnāma) in medieval times and the remarkable attention of the authors of mirrors for princes to Firdausī‘s opus are particularly illuminating in this regard. The survey is complemented by a close textual reading of the Ardashīr cycle in the Shāhnāma in comparison with other medieval historical accounts about Ardashīr, in order to illustrate how history in the Shāhnāma is reduced to only a framework for the presentation of ideas and ideals of kingship. Based on ancient Persian beliefs regarding the ideal state of the world, I argue that Ardashīr in the Shāhnāma is represented as a Saviour of the world. Within this context, I offer new interpretations of the symbolic tale of Ardashīr‘s fight against a giant worm, and explain why the idea of the union of kingship and religion, a major topic in almost all medieval Persian mirrors for princes, has often been attributed to Ardashīr. Finally, I compare iii the Ardashīr cycle in the Shāhnāma with nine medieval Persian mirrors for princes to demonstrate that the ethico-political concepts contained in them, as well as the portrayal of Ardashīr, remain more or less the same in all these works. Study of the Shāhnāma as a mirror for princes, as this study shows, not only reveals the meaning of its symbolic tales, but also sheds light on the pre-Islamic roots of some of the ethicopolitical concepts presented in the medieval Perso-Islamic literature of wisdom and advice for kings and courtiers.

20 citations

Book
01 Feb 2012

16 citations