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Journal ArticleDOI

Drink driving offender rates in Tasmania

01 May 1989-Australian Geographer (Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)-Vol. 20, Iss: 1, pp 74-79
TL;DR: Age‐specific drink driving offender rates for local government areas in Tasmania show marked variation and a clearcut rural/urban dichotomy in offender rates is not apparent, and explanations are sought in the combination of people, place and policing characteristics of different areas.
Abstract: SUMMARY Age‐specific drink driving offender rates for local government areas in Tasmania show marked variation. Generally high rates typify larger urban centres, some more densely settled rural areas and the west coast mining municipalities. However, a clearcut rural/urban dichotomy in offender rates is not apparent and explanations are sought in the combination of people, place and policing characteristics of different areas.
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Book
01 Apr 1982

101 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the past forty years students have become less and less disposed to posit new hypotheses concerning the influences of physical geography upon crime, and have become either skeptical of the old hypotheses or disinterested in them.
Abstract: DURING the past forty years students have become less and less disposed to posit new hypotheses concerning the influences of physical geography upon crime, and have become either skeptical of the old hypotheses or disinterested in them. The observations and brilliant speculations concerning the general effects of the geographical environment made by a continuous succession of social philosophers and social geographers following Montesquieu (1689-1755) 1 and Buckle (1821-62) 2 culminated during the 1890's in the extended empirical investigations of Albert Leffingwell and E. G. Dexter.4 The latter two studied the effects of separate phases of weather upon specific classes of behavior and upon crime in particular. The four succeeding decades in the twentieth century have not witnessed any comparable research efforts to check or amplify the theories of meteorological influence.

91 citations

Book
24 Jul 2015
TL;DR: The role of the policeman in the community and attitudes towards the police are now matters of active public concern as discussed by the authors, and Maureen Cain gives an account of how the police operate in the United Kingdom.
Abstract: The role of the policeman in the community and attitudes towards the police are now matters of active public concern. In this important and enlightening study, first published in 1973, Maureen Cain gives an account of how the police operate in the United Kingdom. Her book will be of great value to sociologists, criminologists and policemen alike.

82 citations

Book
01 Jan 1969
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss a research project which sought, as its principal aim, to establish objectively and authoritatively both what the Australasian public think of the police and what the police think about the public.
Abstract: INTRODUCTION Commentators on the Antipodean way of life have long identified a strong anti-authoritarian trait among Australians and New Zealanders. It is an attitude which perhaps first came under the notice of the outside world during the course of the two World Wars when Australians, and to a lesser extent New Zealanders, gained the reputation of having little respect for military symbols of authority. Within Australia, anti-authoritarian attitudes have more recently been said to account for the average citizen's view of "the police as enemies, army officers as traitors to democracy... the boss as a barely necessary evil and anyone who gives an order as deeply suspect".Because of the Australian's hostility towards those in power over him, it has been claimed that "relations between the police and the public are probably worse in Australia than anywhere else in the world".2 No evidence has been provided to support this sweeping statement, but it is a view quite frequently expressed in Australia, and, in the case of police-public relations in New Zealand, in that country as well. This book discusses a research project which sought, as its principal aim, to establish objectively and authoritatively both what the Australasian public think of the police and what the police think about the public. It begins by looking at the important stages in the development of the Australian and New Zealand police forces with particular reference to placing in historical perspective many of the present-day problems confronting police, and in particular, the problem of establishing good relations with the public. The remaining chapters of the book discuss the results of surveys carried out by the authors on police-public relations and suggest methods of improving relations between the two groups. General police organization and working conditions are also discussed when they bear on the problem of police-public relations and police efficiency. This book is largely the result of data generated from very substantial surveys carried out among citizens and the police in Australia and New Zealand. Because such a large part of the book is taken up with material gathered from thousands of interviews, it is important at this stage to mention the conceptual framework followed by the authors in conducting the surveys…….

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Ross Homel1
TL;DR: In this article, it is argued that the power granted to police and magistrates to exercise discretion in the performance of their duties has a pervasive influence in the production of the conviction and sentencing statistics, although road user characteristics (such as the times and frequency of driving) are of primary importance.

23 citations