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Journal ArticleDOI

Durational ethics: Search, finding, and translation of Fauconnet’s “Essay on responsibility and liberty”

31 May 2014-Hau: The Journal of Ethnographic Theory-Vol. 4, Iss: 1, pp 397-409
TL;DR: This paper translated the appendix to Paul Fauconnet's 1920 book La responsibilite to the Germanic register of English, which was devoted to "the sentiment of responsibility and the sentiment of liberty." The ideas in this piece were clearly developed in conversation with Durkheim and with other members of the group.
Abstract: This paper introduces and explains the forum around my translation of the appendix to Paul Fauconnet’s 1920 book, entitled La responsibilite. Etude de sociologie , which resulted from his doctoral thesis. The appendix of this book is devoted to “The sentiment of responsibility and the sentiment of liberty.” The ideas in this piece on liberty were clearly developed in conversation with Durkheim and with other members of the group. My reading in the anthropology of ethics for papers of my own, led me to new work on liberty, but I found less attention than I expected in our contemporary anthropological scholarship to what I called durational ethics , which encompasses concepts such as responsibility, in the prospective sense, and fortitude. The following introduction explains this trajectory of exploration, which lead me to Fauconnet’s work, excerpts passages from a conference paper of mine entitled “Steadfastness and goodness,” and prefaces the translation. In addition, it profiles Fauconnet and offers a background to the concept of libre arbitre in Romance language thought, as differing from its usual translation as “free will” in the Germanic register of English.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the ethical entailments of speech and action and demonstrate the centrality of ethical practice, judgment, reasoning, responsibility, cultivation, commitment, and questioning in social life.
Abstract: What is the place of the ethical in human life? How do we render it visible? How might sustained attention to the ethical transform anthropological theory and enrich our understanding of thought, speech, and social action? This volume offers a significant attempt to address these questions. It is a common experience of most ethnographers that the people we encounter are trying to do what they consider right or good, are being evaluated according to criteria of what is right and good, or are in some debate about what constitutes the human good. Yet anthropological theory has tended to overlook all this in favor of analyses that emphasize structure, power, and interest.Bringing together ethnographic exposition with philosophical concepts and arguments and effectively transcending subdisciplinary boundaries between cultural and linguistic anthropology, the essays collected in this volume explore the ethical entailments of speech and action and demonstrate the centrality of ethical practice, judgment, reasoning, responsibility, cultivation, commitment, and questioning in social life. Rather than focus on codes of conduct or hot-button issues, they make the cumulative argument that ethics is profoundly ordinary,pervasive-and possibly even intrinsic to speech and action. In addition to deepening our understanding of ethics, the volume makes an incisive and necessary intervention in anthropological theory,recasting discussion in ways that force us to rethink such concepts as power, agency, and relativism.Individual chapters consider the place of ethics with respect to conversation and interaction; judgment and responsibility; formality, etiquette, performance, ritual, and law; character and empathy; social boundaries and exclusions; socialization and punishment; and commemoration, history, and living together in peace and war.Together they offer a comprehensive portrait of an approach that is now critical for advancing anthropological theory and ethnographic description, as well as fruitful conversation with philosophy.

152 citations

21 Sep 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, Pandian describes the Crooked Stalks in South India as a metaphor for "cultivating virtue in south India" and "culturing virtue in South Asia".
Abstract: Resenha da obra "Crooked Stalks. Cultivating Virtue in South India" (2009), de Anand Pandian.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that "responsibilities across generations are at the forefront of policy agenda; whether this is climate change, remains of the nuclear age, care for the vulnerable, plastics pollution, public debt, or p...
Abstract: Responsibilities across generations are at the forefront of policy agenda; whether this is climate change, remains of the nuclear age, care for the vulnerable, plastics pollution, public debt, or p...

13 citations


Cites background from "Durational ethics: Search, finding,..."

  • ...These were abstract and indeterminate, pointing to what Jane Guyer has described as ‘durational ethics of responsibility’ (Guyer 2014a, 2017)....

    [...]

  • ...…translated into a contract between the Department of Energy and private nuclear utilities, this resolution took hold on a punctuated and calendrical time, a nuclear calendar, with ‘intricately exact, contractual and recorded’ engagements (Guyer 2014b, p.148), delimiting responsibilities in time....

    [...]

References
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Book
11 Nov 2011
TL;DR: The Child in the Broom Closet as discussed by the authors is a classic example of a child in the broom closet, where the part that has no part is not part of the story.
Abstract: Preface ix Acknowledgments xiii Introduction. The Child in the Broom Closet 1 1. The Part That Has No Part 47 2. The Brackets of Recognition 75 3. Road Kill: Ethical Substance, Exhaustion, Endurance 101 4. Events of Abandonment 131 5. After Good and Evil, Whither Sacrificial Love? 163 Conclusion. Negative Critique, Positive Sociographies 187 Notes 193 Bibliography 211 Index 225

688 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors trace the optionality and consonance of this shift toward the relative evacuation of the near future in religion and economics by examining different theoretical positions within each domain, and suggest that the near-future is being reinhabited by forms of punctuated time, such as the dated schedules of debt and other specific event-driven temporal frames.
Abstract: A view from 1950s and 1960s Britain suggests that the public culture of temporality in the United States has shifted from a consequential focus on reasoning toward the near future to a combination of response to immediate situations and orientation to a very long-term horizon. This temporal perspective is most marked in the public rhetoric of macroeconomics, but it also corresponds in remarkable ways to evangelicals' views of time. In this article, I trace the optionality and consonance of this shift toward the relative evacuation of the near future in religion and economics by examining different theoretical positions within each domain. In conclusion, I suggest that the near future is being reinhabited by forms of punctuated time, such as the dated schedules of debt and other specific event-driven temporal frames.

521 citations

Book
01 Apr 2013
TL;DR: The political promise of the performative can be found in the sociality of self-poietics: Talking back to the violence of recognition 64 7 Recognition and survival, or surviving recognition 75 8 Relationality as self-dispossession 92 9 Uncounted bodies, incalculable performativity 97 10 Responsiveness as responsibility 104 11 Ex-propriating the performive 126 12 Dispossessed languages, or singularities named and renamed 131 13 The political promise and its resistances 149 15 Enacting another vulnerability: On owing and owning 158 16 Trans-
Abstract: Preface vii 1 Aporetic dispossession, or the trouble with dispossession 1 2 The logic of dispossession and the matter of the human (after the critique of metaphysics of substance) 10 3 A caveat about the "primacy of economy" 38 4 Sexual dispossessions 44 5 (Trans)possessions, or bodies beyond themselves 55 6 The sociality of self-poietics: Talking back to the violence of recognition 64 7 Recognition and survival, or surviving recognition 75 8 Relationality as self-dispossession 92 9 Uncounted bodies, incalculable performativity 97 10 Responsiveness as responsibility 104 11 Ex-propriating the performative 126 12 Dispossessed languages, or singularities named and renamed 131 13 The political promise of the performative 140 14 The governmentality of "crisis" and its resistances 149 15 Enacting another vulnerability: On owing and owning 158 16 Trans-border affective foreclosures and state racism 164 17 Public grievability and the politics of memorialization 173 18 The political affects of plural performativity 176 19 Conundrums of solidarity 184 20 The university, the humanities, and the book bloc 188 21 Spaces of appearance, politics of exposure 193 Notes 198 Index 205

518 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors propose an approche possible for l'etude comparee et ethnographique de l'ethique et de la liberte, and quelques commentaires succincts on le jainisme servent a l'illustrer.
Abstract: Il ne peut y avoir une anthropologie morale developpee et soutenue sans qu'un interet ethnographique et theorique - jusqu'a present absent de l'anthropologie - soit aussi porte a la notion de la liberte. L'A. propose une approche possible pour l'etude comparee et ethnographique de l'ethique et de la liberte, et quelques commentaires succincts sur le jainisme servent a l'illustrer.

415 citations