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E-Books: Ten Questions

01 Jan 2012-
TL;DR: E-Books: Ten Questions asks readers to consider whether they would like to be a teacher or a student, and some suggest that the former is more beneficial than the latter.
Abstract: Title: E-Books: Ten Questions Authors: Rao, Y S
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Proceedings Article
01 Nov 2014
TL;DR: The system was developed with Year 4 students in mind and after conducting experiments, it was seen that the Adaptive eBook does have the ability of helping students understand the text better, especially those who suffer from sentence length.
Abstract: A challenge identified in the current education system is that students, irrelevant of their reading capabilities, are required to follow the same literature. This paper presents a system designed to address such a challenge. The Adaptive eBook has the capability of switching the text to a simpler version, as soon as the built-in reading problem detector detects a reading difficulty. The system was developed with Year 4 students in mind and after conducting experiments with 45 Year 4 students from State and Private schools, it was seen that the Adaptive eBook does have the ability of helping students understand the text better, especially those who suffer from sentence length. From a survey given to 110 parents of Year 4 students on how they see the concept of their child having an Adaptive eBook, 80% of such parents believe that the system would help their children both from an educational perspective as well as a personal one. In addition to the positive results achieved, another success factor is the fact that the Adaptive eBook does not simply offer a helpful system to children, but it also offers an innovative concept that could be expanded and improved in several ways.

5 citations


Cites background from "E-Books: Ten Questions"

  • ...Several definitions were proposed but the main idea is that of a literary work available in some digital format, so as to store and communicate some sort of knowledge through reading [17], [18], [19]....

    [...]

References
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01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Issues of information literacy and information anxiety are explored with regard to their relevancy to improving the retrieval skills of non-professional users and it is important that non- professional users learn to navigate successfully in an excessively information-rich environment.
Abstract: Initial user benefits from search engine technology have been critically degraded over time by the rapid increase of Internet pages. Traditional retrieval strategies therefore yield increasingly poor results due to a dramatic increase in ballast in the results. Search engine users thus increasingly experience information overload. Technical approaches to dealing with this problem have caused an initial euphoria, yet have proven ineffective in solving the problem. Enhancement of user empowerment in the area of Internet-based information retrieval must therefore be grounded in the augmentation of user capabilities. Alternative retrieval strategy approaches including a demonstration of their best areas of application are offered. Issues of information literacy and information anxiety are explored with regard to their relevancy to improving the retrieval skills of non-professional users. Users must redefine their information needs and processing habits. Pre-filtering of perceived information requirements to reduce the amounts of information actively sought and acquired, while upgrading its quality, i.e. improving the precision/recall ratio, is a learnable trait. In terms of securing the future utility of inexpensive, universal-access online information exchange forums such as the Web, it is important that non-professional users learn to navigate successfully in an excessively information-rich environment.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper suggests an Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based improvement of the OEB format as a standard and describes that PDF can be used together for different aspects of publishing process.

36 citations

Book
08 Jun 2000
TL;DR: The role of English as an international lingua franca is discussed in this article, and conclusions are drawn for the varying activities of translation today and for the rapidly changing job profile of the translator.
Abstract: Recent developments, particularly globalization and advances in technology, have affected our production and perception of language, as reflected in two conflicting forces, globalism and tribalism. The role of English as an international lingua franca is dicussed, and conclusions are drawn for the varying activities of translation today and for the rapidly changing job profile of the translator.

31 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: An electronic book design called the Bi Sheng is proposed, which attempts to accommodate the significant features of conventional books while adding functionality derived from the electronic form of the text.
Abstract: This paper proposes a design for the electronic book based on discussions with frequent book readers. We adopted a conceptual framework for this project consisting of a spectrum of possible designs, with the conventional bound book at one difference pole, and the laptop computer at the other; the design activity then consisted of appropriately locating the new electronic book somewhere on this spectrum. Our data collection consisted of a web-based survey and two focus groups, all of which used a set of questions based on five human factors, to collect information on the opinions and practices common to graduate students in English and other frequent readers. Our purpose was to identify features considered crucial by frequent book readers. We addressed the goal of incorporating these features by developing an electronic book design called the Bi Sheng, which attempts to accommodate the significant features of conventional books while adding functionality derived from the electronic form of the text. INTRODUCTION The electronic book and electronic book reader have not yet been widely adopted by the majority of frequent book readers. This paper addresses the question of what an electronic book might look like that would appeal to this demographic. We ran a study with frequent book readers, in an attempt to gauge their reaction to existing e-books and e-readers, in order to identify what elements they consider crucial in the reading experience. We found that frequent readers would reasonably wish to retain the familiarity and benefits of regular book-reading that they have enjoyed, but would be interested in a technology that added still more benefits. In response, we propose a new design for the electronic book, the Bi Sheng,' which will combine the pleasure of book-reading with the flexibility of the e-book and e-book reader. Although he aptly concluded, in 1992, that manipulating electronic text was still more difficult than manipulating paper, Andrew Dillon also proposed that there might be better ways to organize information. However, by the time the second edition of Designing Usable Electronic Text (2004) appeared, Dillon's assessment on paper preference and usability had not really changed. He claimed that research still "suggests that paper is by far the preferred medium for reading" and that transferring texts to the "electronic medium is insufficient and often detrimental to use" (p. 4). The book is not a limiting form, he suggested; one could argue for "paper being the liberator as at least the reader always has access to the full text" (p. 117). Proposing a way to shape the electronic text for greater Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Dillon suggests the TIME framework (task, information, text and ergonomie variables) in an attempt to work with readers' tendency to impress structure on information (p. 126). For the purpose of our study, we look to a skill which is learned early and is easily transferable - text manipulation (p. 139). Manipulating paper and pages is a crucial and familiar aspect of interaction with a text; any attempt to create an electronic book for the frequent reader must, in some form, reproduce this (p. 179). Because electronic texts, especially e-books and e-book readers, have yet to provide the visual and tactile affordances provided by paper texts (e.g., the two dimensions of the electronic book give no indication of text size, content quality, age or usage (p. 125), an electronic book which provides those elements would serve as a mid-point between the useful familiarity of the paper text and the potential of the electronic. The Bi Sheng would provide what Dillon (2003) calls for: an e-book reader with a "richer sense of user experience, one that allows for aesthetics as much as efficiency" (p. 68). AVERSION HISTORY In the year 2000, D.T. Max looked back at the already cooled e-book industry, recollecting in "1994, when I first reported on the proposed electronic-book industry, I drank a lot of cappuccino with pony-tailed men who quoted Marshall McLuhan. …

4 citations