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Journal ArticleDOI

Early Irish and Welsh Kinship.

TL;DR: In this paper, the structure of Irish kinship, kinship and lordship in Ireland and Wales, and kinsman and neighbour in Ireland, are discussed, as well as the shape of Welsh kinship.
Abstract: List of maps List of genealogical tables Note on terminology Part I. Irish Kinship: The structure of Irish kinship Irish ruling kindreds Part II. Welsh Kinship: The shape of Welsh kinship The Gwely and the Gafael Part III. Claims to Land by Virtue of Kinship: Irish Tellach Welsh Dadannudd Part IV. Kin and Lord The half-free in Ireland Irish clientship Kinship and lordship in Wales Part V. Kinsman and Neighbour: Kinship and neighbourhood in Ireland Kinship and neighbourhood in Wales Conclusion and further reflections Appendices Bibliography Glossary Index.
Citations
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule is discussed in this article.
Abstract: From the later third century, Germans whom the literary sources called Franks had joined with other barbarians to challenge Roman rule in Gaul. This chapter acknowledges the importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule. The kingdom in north-eastern Gaul was sometimes known simply as 'Francia'. It also came to be known as Austria or Austrasia. Although by the fifth century Orthodox Christianity provided a dominant world-view among the Roman population in Gaul, as the Franks expanded into Gaul they nevertheless retained their pagan cults, and even into the sixth century they continued to worship at pagan shrines, especially in northern Gaul. In the kingdom of Austrasia various combinations of Frankish aristocrats, Roman aristocrats and bishops competed for influence at the royal court.

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Following on the determination of kinship as mutuality of being, Part Two considers some entailments of this intersubjective relationality in practice as mentioned in this paper, concluding that kinship is not necessarily a mutuality but a relationality of existence.
Abstract: Following on the determination of kinship as mutuality of being, Part Two considers some entailments of this intersubjective relationality in practice. Resume Comme suite a la definition de la parente comme une mutualite d'existence, cette deuxieme partie examine certaines implications pratiques de cette relationalite intersubjective.

88 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The annona system may have tied shippers into the regular transport of Egyptian grain to the Byzantine capital, but not so tightly as to preclude them from the simultaneous pursuit of private profit as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The biggest player in the sixth- and seventh-century Mediterranean economy was obviously the Byzantine Empire, which alone maintained the means and the motive routinely to encourage the bulk transportation of staple items between regions. Part of the agricultural surplus from the wealthiest of all the lands around the Mediterranean, Egypt, had long been diverted to assure supplies of grain for the imperial capital at Constantinople. The Mediterranean afforded wider opportunities for coastal producers to market their surplus, whether in dealings with the state or independently of it. The annona system may have tied shippers into the regular transport of Egyptian grain to the imperial capital, but not so tightly as to preclude them from the simultaneous pursuit of private profit. At privileged western sites like Rome and Marseilles, or Carthage and Naples, the archaeological evidence suggests that the late antique exchange-network persisted in an etiolated form through to the close of the seventh century.

83 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The situation of Italy during the period now often called “late antiquity’ was not always a happy one as mentioned in this paper, the economy was in transition: the number of occupied rural sites began to fall in the third or even the second century, agri deserti were becoming a common feature of the landscape, and towns were losing population.
Abstract: The situation of Italy during the period now often called “late antiquity’ was not always a happy one. The economy was in transition: The number of occupied rural sites began to fall in the third or even the second century, agri deserti were becoming a common feature of the landscape, and towns were losing population. The construction of urban public buildings, one of the distinguishing characteristics of classical civilisation, dried up, and in the early sixth century it was recognised that the population of Rome was much smaller than it had been. As Cassiodorus, a man with long experience in the civil service, wrote: “The vast numbers of the people of the city of Rome in old times are evidenced by the extensive provinces from which their food supply was drawn, as well as by the wide circuit of their walls, the massive structure of their amphitheatre, the marvellous bigness of their public baths, and the enormous multitude of mills, which could only have been made for use, not for ornament.’ The role Italy played in the economic life of the Roman Empire diminished, imported African pottery having come to dominate the Italian market as early as the second century, and its political fortunes were similar. While Rome remained for centuries the capital of a mighty empire, there were very few Italian emperors after the first century, and the advent of Constantinople as the “second Rome’ from the time of Constantine early in the fourth century saw the eastern and wealthier portion of the Empire become independent.

65 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The era of Leovigild marks the apogee of the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo in its Arian phase as discussed by the authors, where the Sueve kingdom was driven back to its original limits and reduced in its autonomy by the interference of the Romano-imperial authorities, who after this established new and powerful interests in Hispania.
Abstract: At the beginning of the fifth century the Sueves had remained within the western limits of the province of Gallaecia, but after the departure of the Vandals they initiated a process of expansion to increase their territory. In short, ten years after their initiation, the Sueve wars had resulted in the Sueve kingdom being driven back to its original limits and reduced in its autonomy by the interference, not of the Romano-imperial authorities, but of the Visigoths, who after this established new and powerful interests in Hispania. The advent of Euric, the new Visigothic monarch of Toulouse, was to mark a change in Visigoth-Sueve relations. The era of Leovigild marks the apogee of the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo in its Arian phase. In the first years of his reign Leovigild focussed his attention on the south of the peninsula, those regions where Visigothic dominion had been endangered as a consequence of the civil war and the Byzantine occupation.

60 citations

References
More filters
Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule is discussed in this article.
Abstract: From the later third century, Germans whom the literary sources called Franks had joined with other barbarians to challenge Roman rule in Gaul. This chapter acknowledges the importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule. The kingdom in north-eastern Gaul was sometimes known simply as 'Francia'. It also came to be known as Austria or Austrasia. Although by the fifth century Orthodox Christianity provided a dominant world-view among the Roman population in Gaul, as the Franks expanded into Gaul they nevertheless retained their pagan cults, and even into the sixth century they continued to worship at pagan shrines, especially in northern Gaul. In the kingdom of Austrasia various combinations of Frankish aristocrats, Roman aristocrats and bishops competed for influence at the royal court.

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Following on the determination of kinship as mutuality of being, Part Two considers some entailments of this intersubjective relationality in practice as mentioned in this paper, concluding that kinship is not necessarily a mutuality but a relationality of existence.
Abstract: Following on the determination of kinship as mutuality of being, Part Two considers some entailments of this intersubjective relationality in practice. Resume Comme suite a la definition de la parente comme une mutualite d'existence, cette deuxieme partie examine certaines implications pratiques de cette relationalite intersubjective.

88 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The annona system may have tied shippers into the regular transport of Egyptian grain to the Byzantine capital, but not so tightly as to preclude them from the simultaneous pursuit of private profit as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The biggest player in the sixth- and seventh-century Mediterranean economy was obviously the Byzantine Empire, which alone maintained the means and the motive routinely to encourage the bulk transportation of staple items between regions. Part of the agricultural surplus from the wealthiest of all the lands around the Mediterranean, Egypt, had long been diverted to assure supplies of grain for the imperial capital at Constantinople. The Mediterranean afforded wider opportunities for coastal producers to market their surplus, whether in dealings with the state or independently of it. The annona system may have tied shippers into the regular transport of Egyptian grain to the imperial capital, but not so tightly as to preclude them from the simultaneous pursuit of private profit. At privileged western sites like Rome and Marseilles, or Carthage and Naples, the archaeological evidence suggests that the late antique exchange-network persisted in an etiolated form through to the close of the seventh century.

83 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The situation of Italy during the period now often called “late antiquity’ was not always a happy one as mentioned in this paper, the economy was in transition: the number of occupied rural sites began to fall in the third or even the second century, agri deserti were becoming a common feature of the landscape, and towns were losing population.
Abstract: The situation of Italy during the period now often called “late antiquity’ was not always a happy one. The economy was in transition: The number of occupied rural sites began to fall in the third or even the second century, agri deserti were becoming a common feature of the landscape, and towns were losing population. The construction of urban public buildings, one of the distinguishing characteristics of classical civilisation, dried up, and in the early sixth century it was recognised that the population of Rome was much smaller than it had been. As Cassiodorus, a man with long experience in the civil service, wrote: “The vast numbers of the people of the city of Rome in old times are evidenced by the extensive provinces from which their food supply was drawn, as well as by the wide circuit of their walls, the massive structure of their amphitheatre, the marvellous bigness of their public baths, and the enormous multitude of mills, which could only have been made for use, not for ornament.’ The role Italy played in the economic life of the Roman Empire diminished, imported African pottery having come to dominate the Italian market as early as the second century, and its political fortunes were similar. While Rome remained for centuries the capital of a mighty empire, there were very few Italian emperors after the first century, and the advent of Constantinople as the “second Rome’ from the time of Constantine early in the fourth century saw the eastern and wealthier portion of the Empire become independent.

65 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The era of Leovigild marks the apogee of the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo in its Arian phase as discussed by the authors, where the Sueve kingdom was driven back to its original limits and reduced in its autonomy by the interference of the Romano-imperial authorities, who after this established new and powerful interests in Hispania.
Abstract: At the beginning of the fifth century the Sueves had remained within the western limits of the province of Gallaecia, but after the departure of the Vandals they initiated a process of expansion to increase their territory. In short, ten years after their initiation, the Sueve wars had resulted in the Sueve kingdom being driven back to its original limits and reduced in its autonomy by the interference, not of the Romano-imperial authorities, but of the Visigoths, who after this established new and powerful interests in Hispania. The advent of Euric, the new Visigothic monarch of Toulouse, was to mark a change in Visigoth-Sueve relations. The era of Leovigild marks the apogee of the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo in its Arian phase. In the first years of his reign Leovigild focussed his attention on the south of the peninsula, those regions where Visigothic dominion had been endangered as a consequence of the civil war and the Byzantine occupation.

60 citations