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Journal ArticleDOI

Economic Due Process and the Supreme Court: An Exhumation and Reburial

01 Jan 1962-Supreme Court Review (The University of Chicago Press)-Vol. 1962, Iss: 1, pp 3
About: This article is published in Supreme Court Review.The article was published on 1962-01-01. It has received 33 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Supreme court.
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Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: A critical evaluation of the various methods of quantitating collagen and elastin is concerned, pointing out the pitfalls to be encountered, and recommending the methods suitable for the particular situations that are currently under investigation in many laboratories.
Abstract: Collagen and elastin are two fibrous proteins which occur in varying amounts in practically every tissue. They are particularly abundant in the connective tissues. Collagen, and possibly elastin, is extremely widespread throughout the phylogenetic system. In the last 15 years there has been a widespread interest in these proteins, including physiological and clinico-pathological studies which depend almost exclusively on an accurate determination of the amount of these proteins in various tissues. In a good proportion of these studies, misunderstandings of the limitations of the methods used have reduced the value of the published data. This article is therefore concerned with a critical evaluation of the various methods of quantitating collagen and elastin, pointing out the pitfalls to be encountered, and recommending the methods suitable for the particular situations that are currently under investigation in many laboratories.

216 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The perpetual momentum of "integration through law" is driven by the substantive dynamics of legal doctrines extending the protection of individual interests and by procedural conditions facilitating the use of European law to challenge the institutional regimes of EU member states as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: At the most general level, the perpetual momentum of ‘integration through law’ is driven by the substantive dynamics of legal doctrines extending the protection of individual interests and by procedural conditions facilitating the use of European law to challenge the institutional regimes of EU member states. Given the supremacy and direct effect of European law, and the decision rules of EU policy making, this momentum could not be halted through political or judicial intervention.

30 citations


Cites background from "Economic Due Process and the Suprem..."

  • ...3 The parallel to the pre-1937 US Supreme Court’s use of the ‘economic due process’ doctrine to prevent all economic regulation (cf. Ehmke 1961; McCloskey 1962; Scharpf 1966) has been noted and criticized by Miguel P. Maduro (1998)....

    [...]

Book
24 Jun 2013
TL;DR: The confirmation process of a Supreme Court justice has been studied extensively in the last few decades as mentioned in this paper, with a focus on the nuts and bolts of the confirmation process and its history.
Abstract: 1. A confirmation process worth celebrating 2. How it works: the nuts and bolts of the confirmation process 3. Public opinion and precedent at confirmation hearings 4. An issue-by-issue look at the hearings 5. The discussion of precedent at the hearings 6. Confirmation conditions 7. The 104th justice 8. Currently contested constitutional questions 9. Our Constitution.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The patient struggle for autonomy at the US Public Health Service Hospital in Carville, Louisiana, in particular, must be located in the postwar period as discussed by the authors, and the conflict between patients and hospital administrators over control of institutional life in the 1950s exposes tension between Carville as home and as hospital.
Abstract: Historians strongly associate the 1960s as marking the beginnings of radical changes in patients' orientation toward their rights. Yet the social and political context of the decades prior to the Second World War distinctly shaped the patient experience in much the same fashion that it gave form to the Civil Rights Movement. The patient struggle for autonomy at the US Public Health Service Hospital in Carville, Louisiana, in particular, must be located in the postwar period. Against the backdrop of how the institution was organized and administered from the 1920s to the 1930s, I focus in this paper on the conflict between patients and hospital administrators over control of institutional life in the 1950s. Their encounters exposed tension between Carville as home and as hospital. Given this focus, the patient challenge to the institutions, which reached a national audience, began to coalesce around the home in general and the kitchen in particular, mirroring the growing prominence of the political dimensions of suburban domesticity as a powerful democratic ideal. At Carville, the private "surburban" home represented freedom from the state.

21 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: The authors analyzes the expansion of the power of the Supreme Court in India by tracing the development of Public Interest Litigation (PIL) and provides an explanatory account of how the Indian Court was able to expand its power through greater activism and assertiveness in governance decisions.
Abstract: This article analyzes the expansion of the power of the Supreme Court in India, by tracing the development of Public Interest Litigation (PIL). It examines how the Indian Supreme Court, through PIL, was able to dramatically expand its role in the governance of the polity, by intervening and challenging key governance failures by the other branches of Indian government. The article then seeks to provide an explanatory account of how the Indian Court was able to expand its power through greater activism and assertiveness in governance decisions.

19 citations