scispace - formally typeset
Book ChapterDOI

Effect of Control Movement Scale on Visual Haptic Interactions

13 Jun 2018-pp 150-162
TL;DR: It was found that the performance of the participants increases with the scale and has an optimum scale at 1:3.3 before reducing rapidly, which is better than natural movements in tasks which require extended accuracy.

...read more

Abstract: Although the human hand is a complex system which can perform multiple actions, when the kinaesthetic actions are scaled in a system, the applications are limitless. In this paper, we examine the effect of control movement scale on user’s kinaesthetic actions. We use the Fitts’ Law for quantifying the user’s performance on different scales and to verify if higher control movement scale, in general, can be better than natural movements in tasks which require extended accuracy. The experiment consists of a Wacom™ tablet as an input device connected to a system. The tablet provides means for scaling the kinaesthetic input movement of a user. The experiment is a modified version of the classical multi-directional tapping task. It was performed on 16 healthy participants with ages between 20 to 48 years. The Fitts’ regressions were visualised and the Z-scores were computed. It was found that the performance of the participants increases with the scale and has an optimum scale at 1:3.3 before reducing rapidly. Future works include experiments involving 3D models and other haptic input devices.

...read more

Topics: Haptic technology (53%), Input device (51%)
Citations
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: To reduce VKC during scaled movements, tasks should be designed such that the visual awareness of the real hand is avoided.

...read more

Abstract: Considering 3D interactions in Virtual-Reality (VR), it is critical to study how visual awareness of real hands influences users scaled interaction performance in different VR environments. We used...

...read more


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A novel method of training fine‐motor skills such as Microscopic Selection Task (MST) for robot‐assisted surgery using virtual reality (VR) with objective quantification of performance is proposed.

...read more

Abstract: BACKGROUND Training surgeons to use surgical robots are becoming part of surgical training curricula. We propose a novel method of training fine-motor skills such as Microscopic Selection Task (MST) for robot-assisted surgery using virtual reality (VR) with objective quantification of performance. We also introduce vibrotactile feedback (VTFB) to study its impact on training performance. METHODS We use a VR-based environment to perform MST with varying degrees of difficulties. Using a well-known human-computer interaction paradigm and incorporating VTFB, we quantify the performance: speed, precision and accuracy. RESULTS MST with VTFB showed statistically significant improvement in performance metrics leading to faster completion of MST with higher precision and accuracy compared to that without VTFB. DISCUSSION The addition of VTFB to VR-based training for robot-assisted surgeries may improve performance outcomes in real robotic surgery. VTFB, along with proposed performance metrics, can be used in training curricula for robot-assisted surgeries.

...read more


References
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This final installment of the paper considers the case where the signals or the messages or both are continuously variable, in contrast with the discrete nature assumed until now.

...read more

Abstract: In this final installment of the paper we consider the case where the signals or the messages or both are continuously variable, in contrast with the discrete nature assumed until now. To a considerable extent the continuous case can be obtained through a limiting process from the discrete case by dividing the continuum of messages and signals into a large but finite number of small regions and calculating the various parameters involved on a discrete basis. As the size of the regions is decreased these parameters in general approach as limits the proper values for the continuous case. There are, however, a few new effects that appear and also a general change of emphasis in the direction of specialization of the general results to particular cases.

...read more

60,029 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Paul M. Fitts1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: The motor system in the present case is defined as including the visual and proprioceptive feedback loops that permit S to monitor his own activity, and the information capacity of the motor system is specified by its ability to produce consistently one class of movement from among several alternative movement classes.

...read more

Abstract: Information theory has recently been employed to specify more precisely than has hitherto been possible man's capacity in certain sensory, perceptual, and perceptual-motor functions (5, 10, 13, 15, 17, 18). The experiments reported in the present paper extend the theory to the human motor system. The applicability of only the basic concepts, amount of information, noise, channel capacity, and rate of information transmission, will be examined at this time. General familiarity with these concepts as formulated by recent writers (4, 11,20, 22) is assumed. Strictly speaking, we cannot study man's motor system at the behavioral level in isolation from its associated sensory mechanisms. We can only analyze the behavior of the entire receptor-neural-effector system. However, by asking 51 to make rapid and uniform responses that have been highly overlearned, and by holding all relevant stimulus conditions constant with the exception of those resulting from 5"s own movements, we can create an experimental situation in which it is reasonable to assume that performance is limited primarily by the capacity of the motor system. The motor system in the present case is defined as including the visual and proprioceptive feedback loops that permit S to monitor his own activity. The information capacity of the motor system is specified by its ability to produce consistently one class of movement from among several alternative movement classes. The greater the number of alternative classes, the greater is the information capacity of a particular type of response. Since measurable aspects of motor responses, such as their force, direction, and amplitude, are continuous variables, their information capacity is limited only by the amount of statistical variability, or noise, that is characteristic of repeated efforts to produce the same response. The information capacity of the motor Editor's Note. This article is a reprint of an original work published in 1954 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, 47, 381391.

...read more

7,257 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
I. Scott MacKenzie1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: The present study provides a historical and theoretical context for the Fitts' law model, including an analysis of problems that have emerged through the systematic deviation of observations from predictions.

...read more

Abstract: According to Fitts' law, human movement can be modeled by analogy to the transmission of information. Fitts' popular model has been widely adopted in numerous research areas, including kinematics, human factors, and (recently) human-computer interaction (HCI). The present study provides a historical and theoretical context for the model, including an analysis of problems that have emerged through the systematic deviation of observations from predictions. Refinements to the model are described, including a formulation for the index of task difficulty that is claimed to be more theoretically sound than Fitts' original formulation. The model's utility in predicting the time to position a cursor and select a target is explored through a review of six Fitts' law studies employing devices such as the mouse, trackball, joystick, touchpad, helmet-mounted sight, and eye tracker. An analysis of the performance measures reveals tremendous inconsistencies, making across-study comparisons difficult. Sources of experimental variation are identified to reconcile these differences.

...read more

1,256 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of motion trajectories qualitatively supported a descriptive model whereby a visually mediated discrete-correction control process is used, as proposed by Crossman and Goodeve and Keele (1968), but evidence of severe nonlinearities in the measured human movement responses did not support the use of linear control models.

...read more

Abstract: The relationship between Fitts' Index of Difficulty (ID = log2 2A/W) and movement time was investigated for finger, wrist, and whole arm motions over a wide range of movement distances (0.25 to 30.5 cm). Results supported Fitts' original speculation that various limb segments may show different maximum information processing rates. Short-distance finger and wrist motions showed much higher rates (38 and 23 bits/sec, respectively) than longer-distance arm motions (10 bits/sec). Examination of motion trajectories qualitatively supported a descriptive model whereby a visually mediated discrete-correction control process is used, as proposed by Crossman and Goodeve (Note 1) and Keele (1968). However, evidence of severe nonlinearities in the measured human movement responses did not support the use of linear control models in explaining the empirical validity of Fitts' law in predicting human motor performance.

...read more

386 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1999-Human Factors
TL;DR: The data indicated that the older participants had more difficulty performing mouse tasks than the younger participants, and age-related changes in psychomotor abilities were related to age differences in performance.

...read more

Abstract: Because of the increased presence of computers in work and everyday life and the demographic "graying" of America, there is a need for interface designs that promote accessibility for older people....

...read more

240 citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20202