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Book ChapterDOI

Effect of Dummy Machines in the Gupta’s Heuristics for Permutation Flow Shop Problems

01 Jan 2012-pp 391-398
TL;DR: This paper deals with improving the make span in an FSP using the concept of Dummy Machine in Gupta’s Heuristics to get two more sequences having make spans that may be optimal/near optimal.
Abstract: Optimizing the Make Span is one of the important performance parameters in a flow shop scheduling problem (FSP). The problem is NP hard. In a general Permutation FSP, the total number of possible sequences is (n!). The job for a shop floor supervisor is that he has to schedule the jobs such that the total processing time is minimum. In the shop floor, due to limited computing facilities and capabilities, still the classical heuristics are popular as they are simple and easy to compute manually for smaller problems. However, in many cases, we get only one sequence. This paper deals with improving the make span in an FSP using the concept of Dummy Machine in Gupta’s Heuristics. In such cases, we can get two more sequences having make spans that may be optimal/near optimal. The effect of dummy machine is analyzed using the well-known Taillard benchmark problems.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple decision rule is obtained in this paper for the optimal scheduling of the production so that the total elapsed time is a minimum.
Abstract: Each of a collection of items are to be produced on two machines (or stages). Each machine can handle only one item at a time and each item must be processed through machine one and then through machine two. The setup time plus work time for each item for each machine is known. A simple decision rule is obtained in this paper for the optimal scheduling of the production so that the total elapsed time is a minimum. A three-machine problem is also discussed and solved for a restricted case.

3,082 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposes 260 randomly generated scheduling problems whose size is greater than that of the rare examples published, and the objective is the minimization of the makespan.

2,173 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple algorithm for the solution of very large sequence problems without the use of a computer that produces approximate solutions to the n job, m machine sequencing problem where no passing is considered and the criterion is minimum total elapsed time.
Abstract: This paper describes a simple algorithm for the solution of very large sequence problems without the use of a computer. It produces approximate solutions to the n job, m machine sequencing problem where no passing is considered and the criterion is minimum total elapsed time. Up to m-1 sequences may be found.

921 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that the optimum (minimum total time) scheduling may be approximated by giving priority to items according to the extent to which process time increases with process number in order.
Abstract: In the situation where a number of items must pass through a number of processes in the same order, it is suggested that the optimum (minimum total time) scheduling may be approximated by giving priority to items according to the extent to which process time increases with process number in order; this criterion is put in arithmetical form. This is confirmed by (a) a simple geometrical argument; (b) comparison with the known optimum schedules of a number of published three-process cases; (c) experiments on larger cases; it is not practical here to find the exact optimum.

568 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Three previously unreported heuristics are included in the study, one of which turns out to be superior to the other ten heuristic tested and is presented in this paper.
Abstract: This paper presents computational experience with eleven flow shop sequencing heuristics. Included in the study are three previously unreported heuristics, one of which turns out to be superior to the other ten heuristics tested. The comparisons were made on a variety of problem sizes, up to fifty jobs and fifty operations.

512 citations