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Effect of kinesio taping on performance in counter-movement jump

01 Jan 2011-Vol. 1, Iss: 1, pp 605-607

TL;DR: Results showed no significant differences (ANOVA, p<0.05) between the two groups in both trials, and improvements in jumping performance could be detected.

AbstractThe purpose of this study was to identify the influence of taping with a flexible tape on jumping performance and its effects on the impulse in a stretch-shortening cycle movement. 23 subjects were divided in control group and intervention group. The subjects participated in two trials of vertical counter-movement jumps. In the trial, the knee extensors of the subjects in the intervention group were taped with an activating taping technique. Reaction forces of the jump were measured with an AMTI-force plate. Results showed no significant differences (ANOVA, p<0.05) between the two groups in both trials. Mean jumping height in Trial 1 was 0.38 ± 0.11 m (control) and 0.33 ± 0.05 m (intervention) compared to 0.35 ± 0.10 m (control) and 0.33 ± 0.05 m (intervention) in Trial 2. No improvements in jumping performance could be detected.

Topics: Jumping (56%)

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Comparisons between studies grouped by the muscle groups examined showed that the effects of Kinesio tapes are not muscle-group dependent, suggesting that the usage of these tapes does not promote strength gains in healthy adults.
Abstract: a b s t r a c t Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test whether certain applications of Kinesio tapes might facilitate contraction and increase muscle strength in healthy adults. Design: A meta-analysis of studies investigating the efficacy of Kinesio tapes application was performed. Methods: The scientific databases Pubmed and Google Scholar were systematically searched for appro- priate articles. Descriptive statistics were extracted to calculate measures of effect size (Pearson's r) and estimate the overall population effect. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using a specific quality appraisal tool. In addition, the included studies were grouped according to the muscle groups examined, to test whether Kinesio tapes effects were dependent on the area of application. Results: A total of 19 studies, comprising data of 530 subjects and 48 pairwise comparisons of muscle strength were included. The methodological quality of these studies ranged from moderate to good. While substantial variability of individual effect sizes was observed, the overall population effect (r = 0.05, CI: −0.23 to 0.34) suggests that, on average, the potential to increase strength by application of Kinesio tapes is negligible. Comparisons between studies grouped by the muscle groups examined showed that the effects of Kinesio tapes are not muscle-group dependent. Conclusions: While the application of Kinesio tapes may have some therapeutic benefits, the usage of these tapes does not promote strength gains in healthy adults.

113 citations


Journal Article
Abstract: Objective: To examine the effect of kinesio tape compared to no tape on vertical jump height and triceps surae electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity in healthy varsity athletes. Design: One group pre-test post-test design. Methods: Twenty healthy varsity athletes (15 females and 5 males) between the ages of 18 and 30 (20.45 years ± 1.36) participated in this study. Each participant was a member of a varsity university basketball, volleyball and/or track and field team. After consent was obtained, the participant completed a Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) and the Waterloo Footedness Questionnaire. The participant then completed a brief warm up and three practice trials of each jump technique. The jumping techniques included the countermovement vertical jump and static vertical jump. The skin at each sensor site was prepped and cleaned and a Delsys Trigno Wireless EMG System was attached to the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. After insuring that the EMG sensors were firmly attached, the individual performed a maximal vertical jump and the height of the vertical jump measured using a Vertec device. The participant performed three trials of a one-footed take off using only his/her dominant foot and a two-footed take off maximal countermovement vertical jump and static vertical jump. Each of these jumps were performed with a one footed take off using the dominant leg only, and then a two footed take off using both legs. Kinesio tape was then applied to the dominant leg using a combined taping technique (facilitatory and mechanical corrective). The maximal countermovement vertical jump and static vertical jump height was then re-tested. The mean rectified average EMG signal intensities and vertical jump heights were analyzed. A paired samples t-test was used to analyze the data comparing baseline to post-taping values with an alpha level set at p<.05. Results: There was a significant increase in mean vertical jump height (t(19)=-4.091, p=0.01) for the one legged static jump with the application of tape. The mean one legged static jump height without tape was 26.29 cm ± 9.12, while with tape it was 28.72 cm ± 7.37. There was no significant difference in the vertical jump height for the one legged static, one legged countermovement, or two legged countermovement jumps. There was also no significant difference in the EMG activity across the four jump types for the gastrocnemius or soleus muscles with and without tape. Conclusions: The findings of this study have shown that the application of an Achilles tendinopathy kinesio taping technique increased the vertical jump height during a one legged static vertical jump. A trend of minor improvement was evident in all of the vertical jumps that were performed with tape. It was found that kinesio tape had no effect on EMG activity of the gastrocnemius or soleus muscles. The improvement in vertical jump height demonstrates that the application of kinesio tape may provide an individual with an athletic advantage in sports such as volleyball and basketball where jump height may be advantageous in certain sport specific situations.

9 citations


Cites background from "Effect of kinesio taping on perform..."

  • ...[24] examined the effect of a flexible tape applied to the vastus lateralis and medialis muscles on jumping performance and on impulse in 23 subjects assigned to either the control or taping group....

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01 Jan 2013
Abstract: The purpose of the present study was to compare of biomechanical parameters between countermovement jump with arm swing and countermovement jump no arm swing, and investigate the effect of arm swing to enhance the performance of countermovement jump. Five male high level athletes participated in this study were volleyball players (age: 20.2 ± 1.06 years; body mass: 82.77 ± 19.3 kg; height: 189.6 ± 9.34 cm). The two methods of countermovement jumps were performed on a strain gage force platform, high-speed motion capture system at a frequency of 250 Hz, video point v 2.5 2D motion analysis for kinematic parameters, and the integration was calculated by OriginPro 8.5 SR1 Data Analysis and Graphing Software. The following variables were analyzed: Maximum height, Low point, Height at TO, Maximum force, Velocity at TO, Kinetic Energy at TO, Potential Energy at TO, Impulse at TO, and the angles of lower limb at low point and take off. To examine the importance of biomechanical parameters on countermovement jump, a comparison between countermovement with arm swing and countermovement no arm swing and a correlations between arm swing and biomechanical parameters were used. The results showed, the performance (countermovement) was better among CMJ arm swing than CMJ no arm swing, of the parameters (Maximum height, Maximum force, Velocity at TO, Kinetic Energy at TO, Potential Energy at TO), and Arm swing was strongly correlated with Maximum force, Velocity at TO, Kinetic Energy at TO, Potential Energy at TO, and Knee angle at Low point. And Maximum height was strongly correlated with Height at TO, Maximum force, Velocity at TO, Kinetic Energy at TO, Potential Energy at TO and Impulse at TO. Finally, the percentage contribution arm swing in improving jump height was noted that arm swing led to an improvement in the CMJ arm swing by 27.08%.

3 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...While the results of Impulse at TO is the largest jump in arm swing, and is considered the Impulse at TO of the important parameters for vertical jump performance (table 2) [17, 18, 25, 27, 28, 30]....

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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: It is recommended that in the technical and tactical training, people who have ACL reconstruction should be used tape to reduce the likelihood of re-injury and increase in muscle strength.
Abstract: Purpose: Increasing in the stability of the body or extremities, support or protection of the joint and the correction of the alignment of the body or limbs might be reasons that have contributed to the effects of elastic taping. The aim of this study was the effect of Kinesio taping on vertical jump test as a skill evaluation test in order to determination of basic ability of men who underwent ACL reconstruction at the different times. Materials and Methods: Thirty six men who underwent ACL reconstruction were contributed in the no taping, placebo and taping groups. In the descriptive way used statistics such as average, Standard Deviation, variance, frequency tables and in the deductive way used GLM repeated measures and post hoc test (LSD) within three groups (P < 0.05). Vertical jump was tested before, immediately, 24 and 48hours after taping. Results: The results have shown that there were significant effects at 24 and 48 hours after taping in comparison before taping in taping group and there were not significant effect in the placebo and no taping groups. Using of tape has a positive impact on explosive muscle performance and operation. Conclusion: For this reason it is recommended that in the technical and tactical training, people who have ACL reconstruction should be used tape to reduce the likelihood of re-injury and increase in muscle strength.

3 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
06 Jul 2016
Abstract: As entorses em inversao do tornozelo sao as lesoes de maior incidencia em atletas de basquetebol. Diversas tecnicas profilaticas sao utilizadas para evitar estas lesoes e a utilizacao da bandagem elastica funcional vem tendo destaque nos ultimos anos. Devido a isso, o objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os efeitos da bandagem elastica funcional sobre a estabilidade do tornozelo de atletas de basquetebol. Foram avaliados 17 atletas da categoria sub-15 de uma equipe masculina de basquetebol. Estes atletas foram submetidos a estabilometria, com e sem a utilizacao da bandagem elastica funcional, colocada sobre a pele que recobre a capsula articular da articulacao do tornozelo e sobre a pele que recobre a musculatura eversora do tornozelo dominante. Como resultados, foi demonstrado que as variaveis estabilometricos de deslocamento medio laterolateral, deslocamento medio anteroposterior e a velocidade media do deslocamento total apresentaram melhores parâmetros com o uso da bandagem elastica funcional. Diante destes resultados, acreditamos que o uso da bandagem elastica funcional proporcionou uma maior estabilidade e uma maior sustentacao articular do tornozelo na posicao ortostatica, podendo ser utilizada com intuito de prevenir lesoes nesta articulacao em atletas de basquetebol. Palavras-chave: basquetebol, tornozelo e lesoes esportivas.

2 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Kinesio taping on the anterior thigh neither decreased nor increased muscle strength in healthy non-injured young athletes.
Abstract: Summary Muscle strength is a key component of an athlete’s performance and may be influenced by taping. This study examined the possible immediate and delayed effects of Kinesio taping on muscle strength in quadriceps and hamstring when taping is applied to the anterior thigh of healthy young athletes. Fourteen healthy young athletes (seven males and seven females) free of knee problems were enrolled in this study. Muscle strength of the subject was assessed by the isokinetic dynamometer under three conditions: (1) without taping; (2) immediately after taping; (3) 12 h after taping with the tape remaining in situ. The result revealed no significant difference in muscle power among the three conditions. Kinesio taping on the anterior thigh neither decreased nor increased muscle strength in healthy non-injured young athletes.

320 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Clinically significant effects of Kinesio Taping in this study included an increase in the bioelectrical activity of the muscle after 24 hours of kinesio taping and the maintenance of this effect for another 48 hours following removal of the tape.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Kinesio Taping is currently regarded by physiotherapists as a method supporting rehabilitation and modulating some physiological processes. It is employed e.g. in orthopaedics and sport medicine. This sensory method supports joint function by exerting an effect on muscle function, enhancing activity of the lymphatic system and endogenous analgesic mechanisms as well as improving microcirculation. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of Kinesio Taping on changes in the tone of the vastus medialis muscle during isometric contractions. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The study group included 27 healthy persons. A Kinesio Tape was placed to support the function of the medial head of the quadriceps muscle of thigh. Transdermal EMG was used to assess bioelectrical activity of the muscle. A standardised protocol was employed for measurement of muscle tone, recorded as the peak torque of the muscle. RESULTS: An examination performed 24 hours after the placement of the Kinesio Tape revealed significantly increased recruitment of the muscle's motor units, as expressed by peak torque. An examination performed after 72 hours of kinesio taping showed a statistically significant increase in bioelectrical activity of the muscle. However, this was lower than the effect at 24 hours. In the group where the tapes were removed after 24 hours, high torque was still maintained. CONCLUSIONS: 1. Clinically significant effects of Kinesio Taping in this study included an increase in the bioelectrical activity of the muscle after 24 hours of kinesio taping and the maintenance of this effect for another 48 hours following removal of the tape. 2. The decrease in muscle tone to the baseline value, which was observed during the fourth day of Kinesio Taping use, may have resulted from the time of effective use of the KT tape being shorter than previously believed and may restrict Kinesio Taping use. 3. Kinesio Taping used shortly before the motor activity it is supposed to support may fail to fulfil its function.

276 citations


"Effect of kinesio taping on perform..." refers result in this paper

  • ...…the effects of Kinesio taping on muscular activity (Janwantanakul & Gaogasigam 2005, Alexander et al. 2003), muscular strength (Fu et al. 2008, Slupik et al. 2007), and especially on jumping performance (Hisieh et al. 2007), but the results and conclusions of the effect of Kinesio taping were…...

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01 Jan 2003
Abstract: The application of tape to the skin overlying the lower fibres of trapezius is generally thought to facilitate this muscle. However, this facilitation has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, the effect of tape upon trapezius motoneurone pool excitability was assessed using the trapezius H reflex. The amplitude of the H reflex was measured across four conditions: before tape application, with Endura Fix tape, with the addition of Endura Sports tape and finally with the tape removed. Instead of the expected facilitation of lower trapezius, this tape inhibited lower trapezius activity. On average, the application of Endura Fix tape inhibited trapezius by 4%. The application of Endura Sports tape overlaying the Endura Fix tape inhibited trapezius on average by 22%. This inhibition did not last once the tape was removed. This suggests that any change in shoulder girdle symptoms or movement, which occurs with the application of this particular tape is not explicable on the basis of the facilitation of the lower fibres of trapezius. r 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

113 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Despite differences in injury type, the rate of injury on third-generation and natural grass surfaces appears to be comparable and it appears that clay is significantly safer than either grass or hard court tennis surfaces, but this is a conclusion drawn with limited data.
Abstract: Synthetic playing surfaces are widely used for field and court sports. Artificial turf surfaces are commonly used as an alternative to natural grass, while outdoor surfaces like clay and acrylic are also prevalent. The effect of these synthetic surfaces on injury rates has not been clearly established. The available literature is largely limited to football and soccer data and the majority of studies are short-term. Confounding variables such as climate, player position and footwear, as well as varying definitions of injury, also make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the general effect of artificial playing surfaces on injury rates. Many peer-reviewed studies cite a higher overall rate of injury on first- and second-generation artificial turf surfaces compared with natural grass. Despite differences in injury type, the rate of injury on third-generation and natural grass surfaces appears to be comparable. It also appears that clay is significantly safer than either grass or hard court tennis surfaces, but this is a conclusion drawn with limited data. Further research investigating overall injury trends as well as sport-specific data is needed to draw more definitive conclusions regarding the effect of artificial playing surfaces on injury rates.

92 citations


"Effect of kinesio taping on perform..." refers background in this paper

  • ...REFERENCES: Dragoo, J.L. & Braun, H.J. (2010). The effect of playing surface on injury rate: a review of the current literature....

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  • ...REFERENCES: Dragoo, J.L. & Braun, H.J. (2010). The effect of playing surface on injury rate: a review of the current literature. Sports Medicine, 40(11), 981-990. Girard, O., Eicher, F., Fourcher, F., Micallef, J.P. & Millet, G.P. (2007). Effects of the playing surface on plantar pressures and potential injuries in tennis. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 41, 733-738. Girard, O., Micallef, J.P. & Millet, G.P. (2010). Effects of the playing surface on plantar pressures during the first serve in tennis....

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  • ...REFERENCES: Dragoo, J.L. & Braun, H.J. (2010). The effect of playing surface on injury rate: a review of the current literature. Sports Medicine, 40(11), 981-990. Girard, O., Eicher, F., Fourcher, F., Micallef, J.P. & Millet, G.P. (2007). Effects of the playing surface on plantar pressures and potential injuries in tennis....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study demonstrates that playing surface affects plantar loading in tennis: Greenset induced higher loading in the hallux, but lower relative load on the medial (SV: −27.3%, p<0.01) than clay.
Abstract: Objectives: To examine the influence of different playing surfaces on in-shoe loading patterns during tennis-specific movements. Methods: Ten experienced male players performed two types of tennis-specific displacements (serve and volley (SV) and baseline play (BA)) on two different playing surfaces; eg, clay vs Greenset. Maximum and mean force and pressure, contact time, contact area and relative load were recorded by an insole with 99 sensors (X-Pedar system) divided into 9 areas. Results: Regarding the whole foot, mean (SD) force (SV: 615 (91) vs 724 (151) N; −12.4%, p Conclusions: This study demonstrates that playing surface affects plantar loading in tennis: Greenset induced higher loading in the hallux (SV: +15.3%, p

71 citations