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Journal ArticleDOI

Effect of Online Second-Hand Shopping Experience on Repurchase Intention: Evidence From Indian Shoppers

TL;DR: The results indicate that online second-hand shopping experience has a significant and positive effect on attitude, trust, and repurchase intention.
Abstract: Research on online shopping experience has been studied intensively over the past years. However, there are only few studies related to online second-hand shopping experience. The present study aims to investigate the effect of online second-hand shopping experience on trust, attitude, and repurchase intention. The results indicate that online second-hand shopping experience has a significant and positive effect on attitude, trust, and repurchase intention. Attitude and trust also have a positive influence on repurchase intention. This study provides implications to second-hand e-retailers to develop marketing strategies to retain the existing customers.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as discussed by the authors examined the effects of providing the product history of clothes on enhancing consumers' trust, perceived benefits, attitude, and usage intentions toward circular fashion service.

27 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This chapter examines the information-seeking behavior of social science faculty in developing nations in an attempt to explain the barriers to information access for these specialized scholars.
Abstract: Developing countries must overcome the obstacles to information access so that they can join the global networks of the developed world and become part of the “information age.” Studies on the informationseeking behavior and information needs of library users in developing countries are limited. This chapter examines the information-seeking behavior of social science faculty in developing nations in an attempt to explain the barriers to information access for these specialized scholars. Information users in developing countries face different challenges than users in developed nations so it is essential to understand the various obstacles that must be overcome by library and information users in developing nations. Comparisons are made to the information-seeking behaviors and information use of social science faculty in developed nations. Patterns of information-seeking behavior in social science faculty are examined and also compared to existing and proposed models of such behavior.

5 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The results of this study indicate that, in women online shoppers, the perception of social presence in an online retail store positively influences their enjoyment of the online shopping experience and the psychographic nature of human-computer interaction as a possible catalyst for e-Commerce Success.
Abstract: The objective of this study is to propose and test the Social Identity Approach to Website Design research model, which considers the role of Social Identity in the development of e-Loyalty. Using an online survey instrument comprised of existing Information Systems and Social Identity measures, data were collected from 322 women online shoppers who were members of the salient ingroup. The results of this study indicate that, in women online shoppers, the perception of social presence in an online retail store positively influences their enjoyment of the online shopping experience. The results also suggest that women online shoppers’ enjoyment of an online shopping experience positively influences their intention to revisit the website or recommend the website to other online shoppers, which are e-Loyal behaviors. In addition, this study extends related studies by proposing and testing the psychographic nature of human-computer interaction as a possible catalyst for e-Commerce Success.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors present a loyalty model based on expectancy-value theory and building on Olsen's satisfaction-loyalty model for online second-hand purchases, which is validated by a survey comprised of 507 respondents who had purchased secondhand products via an online platform during 2020 and found that the dimensions that contributed most to loyal behavior were satisfaction with the vendor and with the website.
Abstract: PurposeIn the last 15 years, online sales of second-hand products have grown substantially due to changes in the economy, increasing interest in sustainability and the new opportunities offered by the alternative markets. However, little is known about the antecedents of customer retention in this particular online market. To this effect, the aim of this research is to bring new insights about what retains shoppers and creates loyal behaviour in this market by presenting a loyalty model based on expectancy-value theory and building on Olsen's satisfaction-loyalty model.Design/methodology/approachTo achieve the above-mentioned purpose, a survey comprised of 507 respondents who had purchased second-hand products via an online platform during 2020 was used to test the model.FindingsThe results validate both the satisfaction-loyalty model and the mediator role of the fulfilment of expectations between perceived quality and satisfaction. The results also indicate that customer fulfilment of expectations depends only on the perception of product quality. Perceived product quality was also the dimension that most influenced satisfaction, followed by perceived vendor quality. Last, the dimensions that contributed most to loyal behaviour were satisfaction with the vendor and with the website.Originality/valueThe originality of this research lies in the validation of the unique satisfaction-loyalty model for online second-hand purchases. The value of this research is that it adds knowledge about effective strategies for platform owners and sellers to enhance customer satisfaction and loyalty in online second-hand markets.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the antecedents and consequences of customer loyalty in an online business-to-consumer (B2C) context are investigated and the authors identify eight factors (customization, contact interactivity, care, community, convenience, cultivation, choice, and character) that potentially impact e-loyalty and develop scales to measure these factors.

2,190 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors established the dimensions of the etail experience, and developed a reliable and valid scale for the measurement of etail quality based on online and offline focus groups, a sorting task, and an online survey of a customer panel.

2,079 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the impact of satisfaction on e-loyalty in the context of electronic commerce and found that consumers' individual level factors and firms' business level factors moderated the relationship between satisfaction and e-satisfaction.
Abstract: The authors investigate the impact of satisfaction on loyalty in the context of electronic commerce Findings of this research indicate that although e-satisfaction has an impact on e-loyalty, this relationship is moderated by (a) consumers' individual level factors and (b) firms' business level factors Among consumer level factors, convenience motivation and purchase size were found to accentuate the impact of e-satisfaction on e-loyalty, whereas inertia suppresses the impact of e-satisfaction on e-loyalty With respect to business level factors, both trust and perceived value, as developed by the company, significantly accentuate the impact of e-satisfaction on e-loyalty © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

2,011 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors developed a general service sector model of repurchase intention from the consumer theory literature and applied it to customers of comprehensive car insurance and personal superannuation services.
Abstract: This paper develops a general service sector model of repurchase intention from the consumer theory literature. A key contribution of the structural equation model is the incorporation of customer perceptions of equity and value and customer brand preference into an integrated repurchase intention analysis. The model describes the extent to which customer repurchase intention is influenced by seven important factors – service quality, equity and value, customer satisfaction, past loyalty, expected switching cost and brand preference. The general model is applied to customers of comprehensive car insurance and personal superannuation services. The analysis finds that although perceived quality does not directly affect customer satisfaction, it does so indirectly via customer equity and value perceptions. The study also finds that past purchase loyalty is not directly related to customer satisfaction or current brand preference and that brand preference is an intervening factor between customer satisfaction and repurchase intention. The main factor influencing brand preference was perceived value with customer satisfaction and expected switching cost having less influence.

1,456 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore risk perceptions among consumers of varying levels of Internet experience and how these perceptions relate to online shopping activity and find that higher levels of internet experience are related to higher or lower levels of perceived risks and concerns regarding the privacy and security of online shopping.
Abstract: Government and industry organizations have declared information privacy and security to be major obstacles in the development of consumer-related e-commerce. Risk perceptions regarding Internet privacy and security have been identified as issues for both new and experienced users of Internet technology. 'This paper explores risk perceptions among consumers of varying levels of Internet experience and how these perceptions relate to online shopping activity. Findings provide evidence of hypothesized relationships among consumers' levels of Internet experience, the use of alternate remote purchasing methods (such as telephone and mail-order shopping), the perceived risks of online shopping, and online purchasing activity. Implications for online commerce and consumer welfare are discussed. The Internet has grown considerably during the past decade, particularly with respect to its use as a tool for communication, entertainment, and marketplace exchange. This rapid growth has been accompanied, however, by concerns regarding the collection and dissemination of consumer information by marketers who participate in online retailing. These concerns pertain to the privacy and security of accumulated consumer data (Briones 1998; Culnan 1999) and the perceived risks that consumers may experience with respect to these issues (Ernst & Young 1999; Milne and Boza 1999; Milne 2000). Consumers' perceived risks associated with online retailing have received limited attention despite their implications for e-commerce. Although some early research suggests that risk perceptions may play a minor role in the adoption of online shopping (Jarvenpaa and Todd 1996-97), several recent industry and government-related studies (e.g., Culnan 1999; Federal Trade Commission (FTC) 1998b, 1998d, 2000) have deemed consumer risk perceptions to be a primary obstacle to the future growth of online commerce. Many involved in online retailing assume that time alone will dissolve consumer concerns regarding the privacy and security of online shopping, yet others argue that greater Internet experience and more widespread publicity of the potential risks of online shopping will lead to increased risk perceptions. To date, no known research has investigated whether higher levels of Internet experience are related to higher or lower levels of perceived risks and concerns regarding the privacy and security of online shopping. Thus, presented here are the results of a study that explores the relationships among Internet experience levels, risk perceptions, and online purchasing rates. This study begins with an examination of Internet users' concerns and perceived risk regarding online shopping. The next area to be examined is how general experience with the Internet and other more-established remote purchasing methods relates to risk perceptions and online purchase rates. Finally, implications for online retailers are discussed with consideration of policy issues surrounding privacy and security on the Internet. PRIVACY AND SECURITY OF ONLINE CONSUMER INFORMATION Statistics and data regarding the growth of the Internet [1] have been widely cited in the popular press. Recent accounts report that over half (52%) of American adults use the Internet, which is twice as many as in mid-1997 (Sefton 2000). Moreover, approximately half of current Internet users have purchased products or services online (Sefton 2000), with average per capita online expenditures exceeding $1,200 in 1999 (Ernst & Young 2000). Looking toward the near future, Ernst & Young (2000) reports that 79 percent of nonbuyers plan to purchase via the Internet during the next twelve months, resulting in online sales of $45 to $50 billion. The issues of privacy and security have been labeled by government and consumer organizations as two major concerns of e-commerce (Briones 1998; CLI 1999; CNN 2000; Consumer Reports Online 1998; FTC 1998a, 2000; Folkers 1998; Judge 1998; Machrone 1998; National Consumers League 1999). …

1,150 citations