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Journal ArticleDOI

Effect of Restriction of Dry Matter and Nutrient Intakes on Productivity of Holstein Lactating Cows Offered High Levels of Concentrate

01 Feb 2009-Journal of Animal Science and Technology (Korean Society of Animal Sciences and Technology)-Vol. 51, Iss: 1, pp 33-38

TL;DR: It was concluded that to allow ad libitum feeding of diet containing high levels of concentrate to the lactating cows might decrease the efficiency of feed nutrients and hence result in no positive effect on productivity of milk.

AbstractEffects of dry matter intake restriction to the level of recommend by NRC (2001) on intake balance of dry matter and nutrients in Holstein lactating cow were evaluated. 24 lactating cows were divided into two groups and individually fed one of the TMR offered as ad libitum (control) and restricted amount (treatment) as recommended by NRC (2001). Milk yield including 4% FCM and FPCM were showed higher tendency in treatment group then those of control group. Also, intakes of dry matter, net energy and metabolizable protein were tended to be higher in treatment group then control group. Actual dry matter and net energy intakes in control group were higher (p<0.001) then those of recommended amount by NRC (2001), whereas no significant differences in treatment group. The estimated NEL allowable milk yield were lower (p<0.001) in both control and treatment group than those of recommended by NRC (2001). It was concluded that to allow ad libitum feeding of diet containing high levels of concentrate to the lactating cows might decrease the efficiency of feed nutrients and hence result in no positive effect on productivity of milk. (Key words : Intake control, Dry matter intake, Net energy intake, Metabolizable protein intake, Milk production, Holstein lactating cow)

Topics: Dry matter (58%), Feed conversion ratio (51%)

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein Model (Chalupa et al., 1991; Sniffen et al., 1992) has developed the need for uniform procedures to partition feed nitrogen into A, B, and C fractions (Pichard and Van Soest, 1977). While carbohydrate fractions are relatively standardized (based on NDF, ADF with corrections for ash, protein, and lignin), the fractionation of plant nitrogen has been open to considerable variation in procedures. This has led to non-uniformity among reported values for nitrogen fractions. This paper recommends reliable procedures for nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) and buffer-soluble protein. These procedures have been examined for reproducibility and relevance to biological expectations. Procedures for acid-detergent insoluble nitrogen (ADIN), and neutral-detergent insoluble nitrogen (NDIN) are also included as they are required for the model. Some alternatives in certain procedures are offered.

2,051 citations


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TL;DR: A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of the aNDF method over the full range of animal feed materials and it is recommended that the a NDF method be accepted for Official First Action status.
Abstract: As an important constituent of animal feeds, fiber represents the portion of feeds that is bulky and difficult to digest. The neutral detergent fiber (NDF) method, developed over 30 years ago, is the method of choice for measuring total fiber in forages and other feeds. Several modifications that were made to improve its general applicability to all feeds and others developed in individual laboratories often resulted in variability among laboratories in measuring NDF. The amylase-treated NDF (aNDF) method, therefore, was developed as an accurate and precise method of measuring total insoluble fiber in feeds. A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of the aNDF method over the full range of animal feed materials. Twelve laboratories representing research, feed company, regulatory, and commercial feed testing laboratories analyzed 11 materials as blind duplicates. The materials represented feed matrixes, including animal products; high-protein, high-fat, and high-pectin feeds; oil seeds; grains; heated by-product feeds; and legume and grass hays and silages. Materials selected varied in chemical composition and contained 0-90% aNDF, 1-16% ash, 1-20% crude fat, 1-40% crude protein, and 0-50% starch. Correcting results for changes in blanks and reporting results as ash-free aNDF organic matter (aNDFom) improved the repeatability and reproducibility of results when aNDF was 10% fat. However, standard deviations of repeatability and reproducibility for feeds with >10% fat were similar to those of other materials. It is recommended that the aNDF method be accepted for Official First Action status.

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TL;DR: A description is given of the new energetic feeding systems for dairy and beef cattle in The Netherlands that are sufficiently flexible to adapt to new information, for which there is an urgent need with regard to some details.
Abstract: A description is given of the new energetic feeding systems for dairy and beef cattle in The Netherlands. Attention is paid to their derivation as well as their application in practice. Both systems are sufficiently flexible to adapt to new information, for which, especially in the beef cattle system, there is an urgent need with regard to some details.

385 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...75로 보고한 바 있으며, 이는 서유럽과 북미에 서 주로 이용되고 있는 Van Es (1978), INRA (1989), NRC (2001) 등에서 권장하는 0.070, 0.070, 0.073 Mcal/kg0....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: More research on factors affecting digestive efficiency of the structural carbohydrate of plant cell walls is needed to develop a precise method for predicting total ration nutritive value of diets fed to the high producing dairy cow.
Abstract: Digestive efficiency predicted from measurements of nonproducing ruminant animals overestimate by at least 12% the digestibility of the same ration fed to the lactating dairy cow. Additional data demonstrate that much of the reduced digestive efficiency of the lactating dairy cow is correlated with the amount of diet consumed per unit of time. Limited data suggest that digestibility of all fractions of the diet are not depressed equally. Digestibility of cellulose and hemicellulose is depressed 2 to 3 times digestibility of soluble carbohydrate at high intake. Most of the systematic bias in the present system of feed evaluation for lactating dairy cows can be removed by adjusting for the effect of intake on digestive efficiency. More research on factors affecting digestive efficiency of the structural carbohydrate of plant cell walls is needed to develop a precise method for predicting total ration nutritive value of diets fed to the high producing dairy cow.

255 citations