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Journal ArticleDOI

Effect of Waste Glass Addition as a Replacement for Fine Aggregate on Properties of Mortar.

17 Jul 2020-Materials (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)-Vol. 13, Iss: 14, pp 3189
TL;DR: It was determined that by increasing the recycled glass sand aggregate content, the density of mortar decreased and the relationships between the properties for mortar containingGlass sand aggregate, and the modulus of elasticity and Poisson coefficient.
Abstract: A responsible approach towards sustainable development requires the use of environmentally friendly, low-carbon, and energy-intensive materials. One positive way is to use glass waste as a replacement for fine natural aggregate. For this purpose, the effects of adding glass cullet to the mechanical properties of mortar were carried out. The glass aggregate made from recycled post-consumer waste glass (food, medicine, and cosmetics packaging, including mostly bottles), were used. This experimental work included four different contents of fine glass cullet (5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.% of fine aggregate). The compressive, flexural, and split tensile strengths were evaluated. Moreover, the modulus of elasticity and Poisson coefficient were determined. The addition of glass sand aggregate increases the mechanical properties of mortar. When comparing the strength, the obtained improvement in split tensile strength was the least affected. The obtained effect for the increased analysed properties of the glass sand aggregate content has been rarely reported. Moreover, it was determined that by increasing the recycled glass sand aggregate content, the density of mortar decreased. In addition, the relationships between the properties for mortar containing glass sand aggregate were observed.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , ground glass powder and crushed waste glass were used to replace coarse and fine aggregates, and significant progress in the tensile strength of the concrete was achieved by 14%, while the waste glass used as a fractional replacement for the fine aggregate.
Abstract: In this study, ground glass powder and crushed waste glass were used to replace coarse and fine aggregates. Within the scope of the study, fine aggregate (FA) and coarse aggregate (CA) were changed separately with proportions of 10%, 20%, 40%, and 50%. According to the mechanical test, including compression, splitting tensile, and flexural tests, the waste glass powder creates a better pozzolanic effect and increases the strength, while the glass particles tend to decrease the strength when they are swapped with aggregates. As observed in the splitting tensile test, noteworthy progress in the tensile strength of the concrete was achieved by 14%, while the waste glass used as a fractional replacement for the fine aggregate. In samples where glass particles were swapped with CA, the tensile strength tended to decrease. It was noticed that with the adding of waste glass at 10%, 20%, 40%, and 50% of FA swapped, the increase in flexural strength was 3.2%, 6.3%, 11.1%, and 4.8%, respectively, in amount to the reference one (6.3 MPa). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis consequences also confirm the strength consequences obtained from the experimental study. While it is seen that glass powder provides better bonding with cement with its pozzolanic effect and this has a positive effect on strength consequences, it is seen that voids are formed in the samples where large glass pieces are swapped with aggregate and this affects the strength negatively. Furthermore, simple equations using existing data in the literature and the consequences obtained from the current study were also developed to predict mechanical properties of the concrete with recycled glass for practical applications. Based on findings obtained from our study, 20% replacement for FA and CA with waste glass is recommended.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors used fly ash (FA) from coal plants as a partial substitute for the cement and EG as a fractional substitute for sand in concrete, respectively, and found that adding FA, CFs, and WG improved microstructure quality at 16% replacement of sand.
Abstract: The disposal of waste from coal plants and waste glass (WG) is causing significant environmental problems all around the planet. Currently, the amount of discarding of these wastes is increased. One possible option is to utilize fly ash (FA) from coal plants as a partial substitute for the cement and EG as a fractional substitute for sand in concrete, respectively. Besides, fibers can improve the strength and durability of concrete; explicitly speaking, using coconut fibers (CFs) is in trend due to their highest toughness among natural fibers making it suitable material as fiber reinforcement in concrete. This research studies the concrete behavior with 15% FA as a partial substitute of cement with 2% CFs and waste beverage glass as sand at various replacement levels (14%, 15%, 16%, 17%, 18%, 19%, and 20%). Mechanical and durability characteristics of concrete were assessed, such as compression strength, water absorption, flexural strength, density, workability, and water absorption. The current study results show that adding FA, CFs, and WG improved microstructure quality at 16% replacement of sand. The study showed that the M4 mix has enhanced the properties of concrete samples as compressive and flexural strength was improved to 47.2 and 6.2 MPa and improved apparent density by 20%. Adding more WGP than the optimal proportion (16%) led to detrimental effects on void ratio, permeability, and water absorption. Therefore, 16% of sand with WG and 15% of FA with cement can be substituted with 2% CFs to develop sustainable concrete.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used waste glass cullets coated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as conductive fillers to develop novel self-sensing cement-based sensors.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A synthesis of the repair methods and materials for reinforced concrete bridge girders proposed in research studies, i.e., state-of-the-art as well as state of the practice established methods are provided to enable researchers, engineers, and decision makers to find the optimal repair approach for specific projects.
Abstract: Bridge structures nationwide across the United States are aging and in need of repair or, in some cases, full replacement. Repair decisions are common among bridge owners because of the economic feasibility when compared to the higher cost of full replacement of damaged or deteriorated bridge components such as girders. Using a proper repair approach, as a long-term or just a short-term solution, can lead to benefits that could not be achieved otherwise such as considerable savings in both time and cost. Additionally, an appropriate repair approach can help avoid adverse environmental impacts, interruptions to service, overburdening of nearby infrastructure, and local opposition to construction. The main objective of this paper is to provide a synthesis of the repair methods and materials for reinforced concrete bridge girders proposed in research studies, i.e., state-of-the-art as well as state-of-the-practice established methods. Different steps in the general repair procedure are explained first. Next, a detailed description of three common bridge girder deficiencies, i.e., shear, flexural, and fire damage, is provided. For each damage type, the main causes and common solutions found in the literature are presented. The authors then provide specific recommendations to each repair procedure. This is intended to enable researchers, engineers, and decision makers to compare the available repair methods more conveniently to find the optimal repair approach for specific projects based on economic and environmental requirements as well as structural and construction conditions.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the experimental results of the study on mortar samples containing dispersed reinforcement in the form of glass fibers, fully made from melted glass waste (bottles), were presented.
Abstract: The progressive increase in the amount of glass waste produced each year in the world made it necessary to start the search for new recycling methods. This work summarizes the experimental results of the study on mortar samples containing dispersed reinforcement in the form of glass fibers, fully made from melted glass waste (bottles). Mortar mixes were prepared according to a new, laboratory-calculated recipe containing glass fibers, granite as aggregate, polycarboxylate-based deflocculant and Portland cement (52.5 MPa). This experimental work involved three different contents (600, 1200, and 1800 g/m3) of recycled glass fibers. After 28 days, the mechanical properties such as compressive, flexural, and split tensile strength were characterized. Furthermore, the modulus of elasticity and Poisson coefficient were determined. The initial and final setting times, porosity, and pH of the blends were measured. Images of optical microscopy (OM) were taken. The addition of glass fibers improves the properties of mortar. The highest values of mechanical properties were obtained for concrete with the addition of 1800 g/m3 of glass fibers (31.5% increase in compressive strength, 29.9% increase in flexural strength, and 97.6% increase in split tensile strength compared to base sample).

27 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The concrete industry is known to leave an enormous environmental footprint on Planet Earth as discussed by the authors, which contributes to the general appearance that concrete is not particularly environmentally friendly or compatible with the demands of sustainable development.
Abstract: The concrete industry is known to leave an enormous environmental footprint on Planet Earth. First, there are the sheer volumes of material needed to produce the billions of tons of concrete worldwide each year. Then there are the CO2 emissions caused during the production of Portland cement. Together with the energy requirements, water consumption and generation of construction and demolition waste, these factors contribute to the general appearance that concrete is not particularly environmentally friendly or compatible with the demands of sustainable development. This paper summarizes recent developments to improve the situation. Foremost is the increasing use of cementitious materials that can serve as partial substitutes for Portland cement, in particular those materials that are by-products of industrial processes, such as fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag. But also the substitution of various recycled materials for aggregate has made significant progress worldwide, thereby reducing the need to quarry virgin aggregates. The most important ones among these are recycled concrete aggregate, post-consumer glass, scrap tires, plastics, and by-products of the paper and other industries.

1,120 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the possibility of using finely ground waste glass as partial cement replacement in concrete was examined through three sets of tests: the lime-glass tests to assess the pozzolanic activity of ground glass, the compressive strength tests of concrete having 30% cement replaced by ground glass to monitor the strength development, and the mortar bar tests to study the potential expansion.

591 citations


"Effect of Waste Glass Addition as a..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Other scientists [23,62,63] have come to the same conclusion....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a fine glass powder (GLP) was used for incorporation into concrete as a pozzolanic material to suppress the alkali reactivity of coarser glass particles as well as that of natural reactive aggregates.

544 citations


"Effect of Waste Glass Addition as a..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Other scientists [23,62,63] have come to the same conclusion....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, waste glass is used as coarse aggregates in the concrete and shown to have no significant effect on the workability and strength of the concrete with fresh and hardened concrete tests.

513 citations


"Effect of Waste Glass Addition as a..." refers background in this paper

  • ... Also,  Topçu and Canbaz [27] attributed the change in air content to the geometry of crushed waste glass....

    [...]

  • ...Also, Topçu and Canbaz [27] attributed the change in air content to the geometry of crushed waste glass....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the morphology, fineness and pozzolanic activity of four glass powders (GP-fine and GP-dust) were investigated from the screening of crushed waste glasses, one from a dust collector for the glass crushing process and two from further grinding of the powder from the dust collector in a ball mill.

488 citations


"Effect of Waste Glass Addition as a..." refers background in this paper

  • ...[64] determined that the strength activity indices of fine glass powder with particle sizes ranging from 40 to 700 μm were 74% at 28 days, but 70% at seven days....

    [...]