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Effekter av automatiserade beställningssystem i dagligvaruhandeln

01 Jan 2013-

AbstractSyftet med denna uppsats ar att undersoka hur implementeringen av ett automatiserat bestallningssystem paverkar, dels den fysiska forstorelsen och dels arbetssattet i butikerna. Vi amnar samtidigt inspirera till vidare forskning inom omradet i allmanhet och pa butiksniva i synnerhet. Den valda metoden ar en fallstudien utifran en induktiv ansats. Fallstudien har enfallsdesign med flera analysenheter. Studien har baserats pa intervjuer, internt material och observationer. Teorierna i studien grundar sig i ERP-system, lagerhantering, automatiserade bestallningssystem, organisationsforandringar, implementering och incitament. Empirin har sin utgangspunkt i internt material samt intervjuer med nyckelpersoner inom Kristianstad-Blekinge Konsumentforening och Coop, pa central- och butiksniva. Slutsatserna ar att det ar svart att pavisa tydliga effekter pa fysisk forstorelse da fallforetaget fortfarande ar i implementeringsfasen. Forbattringar bor dock ske i framtiden da bestallningsstrategin tidigare inte alltid stamde overrens med organisationens mal. Implementeringen har medfort ett andrat arbetssatt i butik. Personalens ansvar har dock inte minskat. Inforandet av det automatiserade bestallningssystemet har resulterat i okat samarbete och storre flexibilitet vad galler bemanning.

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Book
12 Feb 2004
Abstract: PART 1 1. Business research strategies 2. Research designs 3. Planning a research project and formulating research questions 4. Getting Started: reviewing the literature 5. Ethics in business research PART 2 6. The nature of quantitative research 7. Sampling 8. Structured interviewing 9. Self-completion questionnaires 10. Asking questions 11. Structured observation 12. Content analysis 13. Secondary analysis and official statistics 14. Quantitative data analysis 15. Using SPSS for Windows PART 3 16. The nature of qualitative research 17. Ethnography and participant observation 18. Interviewing in qualitative research 19. Focus groups 20. Language in qualitative research 21. Documents as sources of data 22. Qualitative data analysis 23. Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis: Using NVivo PART 4 24. Breaking down the quantitative/qualitative divide 25. Combining quantitative and qualitative research 26. Internet research methods 27. Writing up business research

10,439 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The author discusses the pros and cons of implementing an enterprise system, showing how a system can produce unintended and highly disruptive consequences and cautions against shifting responsibility for its adoption to technologists.
Abstract: Enterprise systems present a new model of corporate computing. They allow companies to replace their existing information systems, which are often incompatible with one another, with a single, integrated system. By streamlining data flows throughout an organization, these commercial software packages, offered by vendors like SAP, promise dramatic gains in a company's efficiency and bottom line. It's no wonder that businesses are rushing to jump on the ES bandwagon. But while these systems offer tremendous rewards, the risks they carry are equally great. Not only are the systems expensive and difficult to implement, they can also tie the hands of managers. Unlike computer systems of the past, which were typically developed in-house with a company's specific requirements in mind, enterprise systems are off-the-shelf solutions. They impose their own logic on a company's strategy, culture, and organization, often forcing companies to change the way they do business. Managers would do well to heed the horror stories of failed implementations. FoxMeyer Drug, for example, claims that its system helped drive it into bankruptcy. Drawing on examples of both successful and unsuccessful ES projects, the author discusses the pros and cons of implementing an enterprise system, showing how a system can produce unintended and highly disruptive consequences. Because of an ES's profound business implications, he cautions against shifting responsibility for its adoption to technologists. Only a general manager will be able to mediate between the imperatives of the system and the imperatives of the business.

3,636 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In traditional supply chain inventory management, orders are the only information firms exchange, but information technology now allows firms to share demand and inventory data quickly and inexpensively, and it is concluded that implementing information technology to accelerate and smooth the physical flow of goods through a supply chain is significantly more valuable.
Abstract: In traditional supply chain inventory management, orders are the only information firms exchange, but information technology now allows firms to share demand and inventory data quickly and inexpensively. We study the value of sharing these data in a model with one supplier, N identical retailers, and stationary stochastic consumer demand. There are inventory holding costs and back-order penalty costs. We compare a traditional information policy that does not use shared information with a full information policy that does exploit shared information. In a numerical study we find that supply chain costs are 2.2% lower on average with the full information policy than with the traditional information policy, and the maximum difference is 12.1%. We also develop a simulation-based lower bound over all feasible policies. The cost difference between the traditional information policy and the lower bound is an upper bound on the value of information sharing: In the same study, that difference is 3.4% on average, and no more than 13.8%. We contrast the value of information sharing with two other benefits of information technology, faster and cheaper order processing, which lead to shorter lead times and smaller batch sizes, respectively. In our sample, cutting lead times nearly in half reduces costs by 21% on average, and cutting batches in half reduces costs by 22% on average. For the settings we study, we conclude that implementing information technology to accelerate and smooth the physical flow of goods through a supply chain is significantly more valuable than using information technology to expand the flow of information.

1,709 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This study is a comparison of the strategies employed in management research in two periods, 1995–97 and 1985–87. Through a content analysis of articles from the Academy of Management Journal, Admi...

1,118 citations