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Journal ArticleDOI

Efficient function call tracing with link-time binary rewriting for CE devices

Bon-Keun Seo1, Jinkyu Jeong2, Joonwon Lee2, Euiseong Seo2 
23 Dec 2013-IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics (IEEE)-Vol. 59, Iss: 4, pp 892-900

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References
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
20 Mar 2004
TL;DR: The design of the LLVM representation and compiler framework is evaluated in three ways: the size and effectiveness of the representation, including the type information it provides; compiler performance for several interprocedural problems; and illustrative examples of the benefits LLVM provides for several challenging compiler problems.
Abstract: We describe LLVM (low level virtual machine), a compiler framework designed to support transparent, lifelong program analysis and transformation for arbitrary programs, by providing high-level information to compiler transformations at compile-time, link-time, run-time, and in idle time between runs. LLVM defines a common, low-level code representation in static single assignment (SSA) form, with several novel features: a simple, language-independent type-system that exposes the primitives commonly used to implement high-level language features; an instruction for typed address arithmetic; and a simple mechanism that can be used to implement the exception handling features of high-level languages (and setjmp/longjmp in C) uniformly and efficiently. The LLVM compiler framework and code representation together provide a combination of key capabilities that are important for practical, lifelong analysis and transformation of programs. To our knowledge, no existing compilation approach provides all these capabilities. We describe the design of the LLVM representation and compiler framework, and evaluate the design in three ways: (a) the size and effectiveness of the representation, including the type information it provides; (b) compiler performance for several interprocedural problems; and (c) illustrative examples of the benefits LLVM provides for several challenging compiler problems.

4,355 citations


"Efficient function call tracing wit..." refers background in this paper

  • ...proposed a compiler-based platform for flexible instrumentation [21]....

    [...]


Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jun 2005
TL;DR: The goals are to provide easy-to-use, portable, transparent, and efficient instrumentation, and to illustrate Pin's versatility, two Pintools in daily use to analyze production software are described.
Abstract: Robust and powerful software instrumentation tools are essential for program analysis tasks such as profiling, performance evaluation, and bug detection. To meet this need, we have developed a new instrumentation system called Pin. Our goals are to provide easy-to-use, portable, transparent, and efficient instrumentation. Instrumentation tools (called Pintools) are written in C/C++ using Pin's rich API. Pin follows the model of ATOM, allowing the tool writer to analyze an application at the instruction level without the need for detailed knowledge of the underlying instruction set. The API is designed to be architecture independent whenever possible, making Pintools source compatible across different architectures. However, a Pintool can access architecture-specific details when necessary. Instrumentation with Pin is mostly transparent as the application and Pintool observe the application's original, uninstrumented behavior. Pin uses dynamic compilation to instrument executables while they are running. For efficiency, Pin uses several techniques, including inlining, register re-allocation, liveness analysis, and instruction scheduling to optimize instrumentation. This fully automated approach delivers significantly better instrumentation performance than similar tools. For example, Pin is 3.3x faster than Valgrind and 2x faster than DynamoRIO for basic-block counting. To illustrate Pin's versatility, we describe two Pintools in daily use to analyze production software. Pin is publicly available for Linux platforms on four architectures: IA32 (32-bit x86), EM64T (64-bit x86), Itanium®, and ARM. In the ten months since Pin 2 was released in July 2004, there have been over 3000 downloads from its website.

3,782 citations


"Efficient function call tracing wit..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Jinkyu Jeong, Joonwon Lee and Euiseong Seo are with the Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Korea (e-mail: {jinkyu,joonwon,euiseong}@skku.edu). functions can then be removed from the boot process....

    [...]


Proceedings ArticleDOI
10 Jun 2007
TL;DR: Valgrind is described, a DBI framework designed for building heavyweight DBA tools that can be used to build more interesting, heavyweight tools that are difficult or impossible to build with other DBI frameworks such as Pin and DynamoRIO.
Abstract: Dynamic binary instrumentation (DBI) frameworks make it easy to build dynamic binary analysis (DBA) tools such as checkers and profilers. Much of the focus on DBI frameworks has been on performance; little attention has been paid to their capabilities. As a result, we believe the potential of DBI has not been fully exploited.In this paper we describe Valgrind, a DBI framework designed for building heavyweight DBA tools. We focus on its unique support for shadow values-a powerful but previously little-studied and difficult-to-implement DBA technique, which requires a tool to shadow every register and memory value with another value that describes it. This support accounts for several crucial design features that distinguish Valgrind from other DBI frameworks. Because of these features, lightweight tools built with Valgrind run comparatively slowly, but Valgrind can be used to build more interesting, heavyweight tools that are difficult or impossible to build with other DBI frameworks such as Pin and DynamoRIO.

2,346 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2000
TL;DR: The authors present a postcompiler program manipulation tool called Dyninst, which provides a C++ class library for program instrumentation that permits machine-independent binary instrumentation programs to be written.
Abstract: The authors present a postcompiler program manipulation tool called Dyninst, which provides a C++ class library for program instrumentation. Using this library, it is possible to instrument and modify application programs during execution. A unique feature of this library is that it permits machine-independent binary instrumentation programs to be written. The authors describe the interface that a tool sees when using this library. They also discuss three simple tools built using this interface: a utility to count the number of times a function is called, a program to capture the output of an already running program to a file, and an implementation of conditional breakpoints. For the conditional breakpoint example, the authors show that by using their interface compared with gdb, they are able to execute a program with conditional breakpoints up to 900 times faster.

615 citations


"Efficient function call tracing wit..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The dynamic rewriting scheme [5]-[9] rewrites pieces of a running program to alter the behavior of them and caches the rewritten instructions to avoid repetitive rewrite tasks....

    [...]


Dissertation
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: D DynamoRIO is presented, a fully-implemented runtime code manipulation system that supports code transformations on any part of a program, while it executes, with zero to thirty percent time and memory overhead on both Windows and Linux.
Abstract: This thesis addresses the challenges of building a software system for general-purpose runtime code manipulation. Modern applications, with dynamically-loaded modules and dynamically-generated code, are assembled at runtime. While it was once feasible at compile time to observe and manipulate every instruction—which is critical for program analysis, instrumentation, trace gathering, optimization, and similar tools—it can now only be done at runtime. Existing runtime tools are successful at inserting instrumentation calls, but no general framework has been developed for fine-grained and comprehensive code observation and modification without high overheads. This thesis demonstrates the feasibility of building such a system in software. We present DynamoRIO, a fully-implemented runtime code manipulation system that supports code transformations on any part of a program, while it executes. DynamoRIO uses code caching technology to provide efficient, transparent, and comprehensive manipulation of an unmodified application running on a stock operating system and commodity hardware. DynamoRIO executes large, complex, modern applications with dynamically-loaded, generated, or even modified code. Despite the formidable obstacles inherent in the IA-32 architecture, DynamoRIO provides these capabilities efficiently, with zero to thirty percent time and memory overhead on both Windows and Linux. DynamoRIO exports an interface for building custom runtime code manipulation tools of all types. It has been used by many researchers, with several hundred downloads of our public release, and is being commercialized in a product for protection against remote security exploits, one of numerous applications of runtime code manipulation. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

362 citations