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Journal ArticleDOI

El evolucionismo y las ideologías políticas

10 Oct 2013-Vol. 32, Iss: 2, pp 49-65
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the ethical and political implications which continue to be attributed to Darwinism in the numerous publications which have followed the bicentenary of Darwin's birth and distinguish between the justified association of various biological hypotheses with certain political tendencies and the unjustified association of evolutionism with various ideologies.
Abstract: The paper discusses the ethical and political implications which continue to be attributed to Darwinism in the numerous publications which have followed the bicentenary of Darwin’s birth. It discusses Darwinism’s relationship to materialism, Marxism, social Darwinism, eugenics, conservatism, creationism, and atheism, distinguishing between the justified association of various biological hypotheses with certain political tendencies and the unjustified association of evolutionism with various ideologies.

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Citations
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04 Aug 2008

21 citations

References
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Book
02 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The Evolution of Morality as mentioned in this paper is one of the few books in this area written from the perspective of moral philosophy, with a focus on the evolution of moral thinking and its evolutionary origins.
Abstract: Moral thinking pervades our practical lives, but where did this way of thinking come from, and what purpose does it serve? Is it to be explained by environmental pressures on our ancestors a million years ago, or is it a cultural invention of more recent origin? In The Evolution of Morality, Richard Joyce takes up these controversial questions, finding that the evidence supports an innate basis to human morality. As a moral philosopher, Joyce is interested in whether any implications follow from this hypothesis. Might the fact that the human brain has been biologically prepared by natural selection to engage in moral judgment serve in some sense to vindicate this way of thinking -- staving off the threat of moral skepticism, or even undergirding some version of moral realism? Or if morality has an adaptive explanation in genetic terms -- if it is, as Joyce writes, "just something that helped our ancestors make more babies" -- might such an explanation actually undermine morality's central role in our lives? He carefully examines both the evolutionary "vindication of morality" and the evolutionary "debunking of morality," considering the skeptical view more seriously than have others who have treated the subject. Interdisciplinary and combining the latest results from the empirical sciences with philosophical discussion, The Evolution of Morality is one of the few books in this area written from the perspective of moral philosophy. Concise and without technical jargon, the arguments are rigorous but accessible to readers from different academic backgrounds. Joyce discusses complex issues in plain language while advocating subtle and sometimes radical views. The Evolution of Morality lays the philosophical foundations for further research into the biological understanding of human morality.

668 citations

Book
01 Jan 1977

568 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Sep 2010
TL;DR: This article examined whether morality really evolved, as many philosophers, psychologists, anthropologists, and biologists claim, and concluded that two versions of the claim are relatively well supported, but that they are unlikely to have significant philosophical consequences, while the stronger version is in fact empirically unsupported.
Abstract: This chapter examines whether morality really evolved, as many philosophers, psychologists, anthropologists, and biologists claim. It distinguishes three possible versions of this claim and reviews the evidence in support of each. It concludes that two versions of the claim that morality evolved are relatively well supported, but that they are unlikely to have significant philosophical consequences, while the stronger version, which is of real interest to philosophers, is in fact empirically unsupported.

471 citations


"El evolucionismo y las ideologías p..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Otro ejemplo es el desarrollo que están adquiriendo en meta-ética las teorías escépticas que explican las normas morales, y el origen de la moral en general, por su valor adaptativo (Joyce, 2000)....

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Book
01 Jan 1977

297 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors consider four criticisms of ecological anthropology: its overemphasis on energy, its inability to explain cultural phenomena, its preoccupation with static equilibria, and its lack of clarity about the appropriate units of analysis.
Abstract: In this essay we consider four criticisms of ecological anthropology: its overemphasis on energy, its inability to explain cultural phenomena, its preoccupation with static equilibria, and its lack of clarity about the appropriate units of analysis. Recognizing that some of these criticisms may not be justified, we nevertheless point to parallel concerns in ecology. Further, we ask whether new directions indicated by some ecologists might be appropriate paths for future work in ecological anthropology. A central theme is the desirability of focusing on environmental problems and how people respond to them. The kind of environmental problems we are especially concerned with here are those constituting hazards to the lives of the organisms experiencing them. In other words, we are particularly concerned with problems that carry the risk of morbidity or mortality, the risk of losing an "existential game" in which success consists simply in staying in the game (82, 85; cf 80, cited in 78). Our focus upon hazards and responses to them emerges partly from consideration of neo-Darwinian selection theory. As Colinvaux (22, p. 499) notes: "Selection . . . chooses from among individuals those which are best adapted to avoid the hazards of life at that time and place." Our focus reflects also the new concern of biologists such as Slobodkin (81, 82, 85) with the actual processes of responding to hazards or environmental perturbations rather than with formal alterations in hypothetical genetic systems. Related also is the emerging view among medical scientists that health is a "continuing property, potentially measurable by the individual's ability to rally from insults, whether chemical, physical, infectious, psychological, or social" (7, 8; cf 78). At least some and perhaps all of the insults referred to in the preceding quotation can be subsumed in our category of hazards; even social and psychological insults may evoke physiological "stress" and disease (60, 79) as well as psychological and behavioral adaptive strategies (99). A further influence on us has been the recent proliferation of research and thinking on problems of human response to "natural hazards" in geography (19,

285 citations

Trending Questions (1)
What were the social and political implications of the Darwinian revolution?

The paper discusses the ethical and political implications attributed to Darwinism, including its relationship to materialism, Marxism, social Darwinism, eugenics, conservatism, creationism, and atheism. However, it does not provide a specific answer to the social and political implications of the Darwinian revolution.