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Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice

01 Jan 2013-
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors encourage contributors to enter items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses, and cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for critical writing and for the creative work.
Abstract: in English) (Text) Abstract (in original language) (Text)in original language) (Text) Language of abstract (Structured Taxonomy) Other language version (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) Pull Quotes (Text) (Multiple) References and Attachments Creative Works referenced (Node reference to Creative Work) (Multiple) We encourage contributors entering items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses. Cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for the critical writing and for the creative work. Critical Writing referenced (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) critical writing comments substantively on another. Event referenced (Node reference to Event) (Multiple) Organization referenced (Node reference to Organization) (Multiple) Publisher referenced (Node reference to Publisher) (Multiple) Database or Archive referenced (Node reference to Database or Archive) (Multiple)
Citations
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2010

944 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

6 citations

DOI
28 Aug 2013
TL;DR: A network analysis of the citations in 29 dissertations is performed to identify trends, patterns and information about an emergingcanon of creative works in electronic literature as represented by a dissertation on electronic literature.
Abstract: More than 60 dissertations in the field of electronic literature have been documented in theELMCIP Electronic Literature Knowledge Base, including tags, abstracts and in most caseslinks to full texts of the dissertations. This paper performs a network analysis of the citationsin 29 of these dissertations to identify trends, patterns and information about an emergingcanon. Introduction The first dissertation about electronic literature was written in 1976 by James RichardMeehan, and was titled The Metanovel: Writing Stories by Computer. Since then, at least 60more dissertations have been written on electronic literature. This vast corpus of researchliterature about electronic literature has not previously been studied as a whole.This paper begins to map creative works in electronic literature as represented bydissertation on electronic literature. Information about references to creative works in thedissertations has been entered into the ELMCIP Electronic Literature Knowledge Base, andkeywords and tags for each dissertation were also registered. The data was then importedinto the open source network analysis software Gephi, where it was visualised and analysed.

5 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: This paper brought together scholars from a range of disciplines to explore the challenges inherent in translating aesthetics and creativity studies to concepts of copyright, especially as longstanding approaches are troubled by the rise of the digital.
Abstract: Technological and economic concerns have long been the drivers of debate about copyright. But diverse disciplines in the humanities - including literary studies, aesthetics, film studies, and the philosophy of art - have a great deal to offer if we wish to establish a more nuanced and useful conception of copyright and authorship. This volume brings together scholars from a range of disciplines to explore the challenges inherent in translating aesthetics and creativity studies to concepts of copyright, especially as longstanding approaches are troubled by the rise of the digital.

4 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: In this paper, Maturana et al. describe the organization of the living and discuss the role of the human brain in the brain's ability to learn and adapt to the environment.
Abstract: Editorial Preface General Table Of Contents Foreword Introduction (by Professor Maturana) Biology Of Cognition Dedication Table of Contents I. Introduction II. The Problem III. Cognitive Function in General A. The Observer B. The Living System C. Evolution D. The Cognitive Process IV. Cognitive Function in Particular A. Nerve Cells B. Architecture C. Function D. Representation E. Description F. Thinking G. Natural Language H. Memory and Learning I. The Observer V. Problems in the Neurophysiology of Cognition VI. Conclusions VII. Post Scriptum Autopoiesis: The Organization Of The Living Preface (by Sir Stafford Beer) Introduction I. On Machines, living and Otherwise 1. Machines 2. Living Machines II. Dispensability of Teleonomy 1. Purposelessness 2. Individuality III. Embodiments of Autopoiesis 1. Descriptive and Causal Notions 2. Molecular Embodiments 3. Origin IV. Diversity of Autopoiesis 1. Subordination to the Condition of Unity 2. Plasticity of Ontogeny 3. Reproduction, a Complication of the Unity 4. Evolution, a Historical Network 5. Second and Third Order Autopoietic Systems V. Presence of Autopoiesis 1. Biological Implications 2. Epistemological Implications 3. Cognitive Implications Appendix: The Nervous System Glossary Bibliography Index Of Names

4,305 citations

Book
01 Jan 1925
TL;DR: In this, his most famous work, Marcel Mauss presented to the world a book which revolutionized our understanding of some of the basic structures of society as mentioned in this paper, identifying the complex web of exchange and obligation involved in the act of giving, and called into question many of our social conventions and economic systems.
Abstract: In this, his most famous work, Marcel Mauss presented to the world a book which revolutionized our understanding of some of the basic structures of society. By identifying the complex web of exchange and obligation involved in the act of giving, Mauss called into question many of our social conventions and economic systems. In a world rife with runaway consumption, The Gift continues to excite and challenge.

3,197 citations

MonographDOI
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: For instance, this article pointed out that intoxication and conversion were common responses even to these abstract and difficult pieces, in which a fraction of the argument was carried on a tide of intuitive affirmation.
Abstract: arguments, that Gregory and others labored to “unpack” over the intervening years; and still there are surprises hidden within them that become visible as the reader comes to move freely in the text. Frequently , during his career, as his Introduction indicates, Gregory felt as if he were speaking and writing in a foreign language. People did not simply agree or disagree with him; they were bewildered or intoxicated. Mark Engels, in his 1971 Preface, recognized the analogy between the “mind expanding” experiences of drugs and religious conversion and the kinds of intellectual change that could be achieved by a pervasive reshaping of patterns of thought. In retrospect it strikes me that intoxication and conversion were common responses even to these abstract and difficult pieces—responses in which a fraction of the argument was carried on a tide of intuitive affirmation. Today, however, it is becoming increasingly possible to come to grips with Gregory’s thinking, to select, affirm, contest, question. Throughout his life, he treasured the relationships in which he found opportunities for intellectual grappling that went beyond admiration adulation; critical reading is essential. This new edition, then, invites readers into an encounter with the work of Gregory Bateson that was only available to a few when the collection first appeared. My advice to readers would be to hang on to the challenge as well as the affirmation. We have not as a civilization achieved those epistemological shifts that may some day enable nuclear disarmament, ecological responsibility, and new approaches to both education and healing that will value and enhance the complexity of persons in their familial and social setting. In these and in Gregory’s later books (Mind and Nature: A Necessary Unity, Dutton 1979, and, jointly with me, Angels Fear: Toward an Epistemology of the Sacred, Macmillan, 1987) the intellectual tools are offered. Today they will come more readily to hand, be easier to balance and handle in a disciplined manner than they were in the early 1970s, be more accessible to practice and skill. But still there remains the challenge of using the tools in such a way that they be-come a part of the user. And still the tasks for which these tools have been shaped largely remain to be done, more urgent today than ever. —Mary Catherine Bateson Cambridge, Mass. August 1987

2,682 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is possible to locate as well as download the wealth of networks how social production transforms markets and freedom Book.

2,097 citations

Book
06 Aug 1997
TL;DR: In this paper, Ricoeur argues that o texto como um todo singular se pode comparar a object, visto de varios lados mas nunca de todos, simultaneamente.
Abstract: Perspectivas e o que temos, quer se discuta o texto quer se discuta o cibertexto. Dizia Ricoeur que o texto como um todo singular se pode comparar a um objecto, visto de varios lados mas nunca de todos, simultaneamente. Decidimos sempre olhar de um certo modo. Ora, estamos num tempo em que do dia para a noite varias propostas, novas perspectivas, novas formas de textualidade emergem. Necessita-se para isso de uma terminologia mais consistente do que as formas que ocorrem.

1,509 citations