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Emile ou de l'Education

TL;DR: Rousseau's education project consists in respecting the natural evolution of the person, her physical, intellectual and moral developments to make of her a natural person able to live in society as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Through an imaginary character, Emile, Rousseau explains his theories on education. His educational project consists in respecting the natural evolution of the person, her physical, intellectual and moral developments to make of her a natural person able to live in society. More than a treatise on education, it is a treatise about human kind.
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01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the problems in teaching tenses to Turkish students at university level in Turkey have been studied and most frequently occurred errors have been listed and they have been analyzed in detail, which revealed that the reasons for these errors mostly derive from mother tongue interference and lack of adequate linguistic background.
Abstract: This study focuses on the problems in teaching tenses to Turkish students at university level in Turkey. Some of the problematic and confusing tenses such as Past Simple and Present Perfect Tense, Present Continuous and Present Simple, Past Simple and Past Continuous Tense Teaching grammar have been handled throughout this study with the data obtained from the written exams of the learners. Most frequently occurred errors have been listed and they have been analyzed in detail. The findings reveal that the reasons for these errors mostly derive from mother tongue interference and lack of adequate linguistic background. The other component of this article is to offer remedial teaching activities for foreign language learners to compensate the shortcomings.

293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discusses contemporary creativity research; cautionary notes, drawn from the American experience, are also included in the article. But they focus on the early childhood education in America, which has always had the creative child at the core of its approach.
Abstract: Although early childhood education in America has always had the creative child at the core of its approach, the field itself has generated little systematic research on the topic. In contrast, the scholarly field of creativity studies, with its focus on basic research and theoretical questions, has impacted education only slightly. Creativity and education may have been disconnected topics in a scholarly sense in the US primarily because (1) early childhood education has relied primarily on theory imported from abroad as a guide to practice; (2) psychometric research on creativity proved conceptually and methodologically flawed, short circuiting widespread use of creativity tests by American public schools; and (3) contemporary approaches to creativity have tended to be either broadly theoretical or primarily concerned with answering basic research questions. The article discusses contemporary creativity research; cautionary notes, drawn from the American experience, are also included.

99 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: It is argued that the Appleinspired touchscreen smartphone is not just another technological innovation, but rather a device that has ushered in a new era in the human–machine relationship and that it has the potential of fundamentally disrupting teaching and learning, including L1 and L2 literacies and learning.
Abstract: The iPhone turns 10 years old in 2017. For the occasion, Apple is rumored to be adding significant new features for the model to be released this year. Whatever those may be, they are not likely to have the same impact that the release of the original iPhone had 10 years ago. That event led to a radical new vision for the design and capability of mobile devices. Within a short period of time, there was an industry shake-up, with Windows and Blackberry phones, the erstwhile smartphone leaders, being reduced to insignificance, along with digital music players (including Apple’s own iPod) and personal digital assistants (PDAs). The original iPhone also spawned a new mobile device industry through its big brother, the iPad. Competing products, inspired by Apple touchscreen devices, soon appeared, notably Android phones and later Chromebooks. These products, in particular, have had a major impact on education, as they have made largely affordable the advanced features introduced by Apple. In this column we will be looking at what these devices have meant for language learning and literacy education. I will be arguing that the Appleinspired touchscreen smartphone is not just another technological innovation, but rather a device that has ushered in a new era in the human–machine relationship and that, thereby, it has the potential (not yet realized) of fundamentally disrupting teaching and learning, including L1 and L2 literacies and learning.

97 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Bolar and Allen as discussed by the authors argue that evolutionary biology has proven contentious in America because of the unique political context into which Darwin's ideas emerged, and argue that evolution's content, and the predominately Northern scientists who supported it, became associated with the politics of radical Republicanism and racial egalitarianism.
Abstract: Author(s): Bolar, Richard Allen | Abstract: America's contentious relationship to Darwinism is often inadequately viewed as the product of religious reaction or educative failure. I argue that evolutionary biology has proven contentious in America because of the unique political context into which Darwin's ideas emerged. After the Civil War, evolution's content, and the predominately Northern scientists who supported it, became associated with the politics of radical Republicanism and racial egalitarianism. The Darwinian revision of the concept of racial variety made a polygenist conception of human origins untenable and discredited the structural inequalities implied by the rival "American School of Anthropology". Whereas before Darwin, natural history had formed an important part of the justification for slavery, after the publication of "The Origin of Species" in 1859, natural history became distasteful to the southern planters and slaveholders who had previously appealed to scientific authority. Because of the particular historical, social, and political context into which Darwinian evolution emerged in the United States, to believe or not to believe in evolution carried social and political connotations about ones fidelity to white supremacy, and called into question ones identity within the larger milieux of American political traditions and groups. Debates over evolution have been inextricably bound to a complex set of beliefs about race and political practices that have upheld white supremacy, sometimes called Southern nationalism, Southern civil religion, or ascriptive Americanism, which have operated to channel Southern understanding and treatment of evolution. The history of evolution in America teaches us how communities of identity use ideological beliefs to identify themselves as members of particular political and social groups, and how a constellation of mutually supporting ideas about the right to participate in the American polity and the nature of racial identity have shaped American reactions to science, religion, and society. Beliefs about racial identity and the constructed myths of Southern nationalism channeled white Southern reaction against evolutionary biology in ways that boosted the religious response to the scientific threat to white supremacy and increased the feeling that evolutionary biologists taught a dangerous, alien doctrine that was morally and socially subversive. The rejection of evolution by many Americans, especially in the South, has often been a way to signal and police social and political group boundaries. Because Darwinism had overthrown the scientific basis for polygeny, was supported by abolitionist New Englanders, and was charged with racially subversive undertones, while also challenging the conservative, Christian justifications for white supremacy, white Southerners reacted against evolution as a scientific doctrine, and in so doing they signaled support for the prevailing racial order and acted in solidarity to create the social and political ideology that sustained the Solid South

84 citations

Book
17 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The Orchestral Revolution as discussed by the authors explores the changing listening culture of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and describes the birth of a new form of attention to sonority and uncovers the intimate relationship between the development of modern musical aesthetics and the emergence of orchestration.
Abstract: The Orchestral Revolution explores the changing listening culture of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Delving into Enlightenment philosophy, the nature of instruments, compositional practices and reception history, this book describes the birth of a new form of attention to sonority and uncovers the intimate relationship between the development of modern musical aesthetics and the emergence of orchestration. By focusing upon Joseph Haydn's innovative strategies of orchestration and tracing their reception and influence, Emily Dolan shows that the consolidation of the modern orchestra radically altered how people listened to and thought about the expressive capacity of instruments. The orchestra transformed from a mere gathering of instruments into an ideal community full of diverse, nuanced and expressive characters. In addressing this key moment in the history of music, Dolan demonstrates the importance of the materiality of sound in the formation of the modern musical artwork.

74 citations

Trending Questions (1)
Are Rousseau's views on education relevant to evolution theory?

The paper does not mention anything about Rousseau's views on education being relevant to evolution theory.