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Journal Article

Encyclopedia of African American Education

22 Sep 2010-Reference and User Services Quarterly (American Library Association)-Vol. 50, Iss: 1, pp 76-77
About: This article is published in Reference and User Services Quarterly.The article was published on 2010-09-22 and is currently open access. It has received 23 citations till now.
Citations
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01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, an interpretive study of African American female elementary principals' experiences in a Southeastern public urban school district was conducted, focusing on the career pathway to the principalship in urban public elementary schools.
Abstract: This study is an interpretive study of African American female elementary principals’ experiences in a Southeastern public urban school district. The purpose of this interpretive research is to specifically examine five African American female principals’ perceptions of supports and barriers on the career pathway to the principalship in urban public elementary schools. The questions for this research included: How do African American females experience the process of becoming elementary school principals in a Southeastern, urban district? How have African American female principals described their experiences with educational institutions, communities and professional organizations? Tillman and Lomotey’s research is used to explain the significance of African American principal leadership in the elementary K-12 setting after Brown v Board of Education. According to Jean-Marie (2013), even though all leaders within educational institutions face numerous challenges in terms of achieving success, African American female principals often face unique challenges that are linked to their own cultural background. This research supports work from Schwandt (1994), who explained that an interpretative lens focuses on worldview values and embraces subjective interpretation while acknowledging such interpretations are socially constructed and therefore, shaped by the researcher’s own stand or position on a topic. The participants shared stories of experiences, supports from their family, spirituality, and community connection. The data provided evidence that life experiences, educational background, and educational programs informed the analysis of the career pathway to the elementary principalship.

14 citations


Cites background from "Encyclopedia of African American Ed..."

  • ...According to Lomotey (2010), many African American principals of elementary schools were demoted or fired, with race perceived as a plausible culprit....

    [...]

  • ...The Supreme Court unanimously held that race-based segregation of children was a violation of the U.S. Constitution (Lomotey, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...For example, in Topeka, Kansas, Linda Brown, an African American child, was forced to walk about a mile through a railroad switchyard to catch a bus to her all-African American elementary school, even though a White elementary school was just seven blocks away from her home (Lomotey, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...During this important case, the Court unanimously agreed that the racial segregation of children in public institutions of education was a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution....

    [...]

  • ...According to Lomotey (2010), prior to the Plessy v Ferguson case, White schools were perceived to offer better quality education than schools in African American communities....

    [...]

01 Jan 2015

13 citations


Cites background from "Encyclopedia of African American Ed..."

  • ...Funding for higher education grew along with access, as there were more options for African Americans to achieve an advanced degree throughout much of the South (Wilson, 1996)....

    [...]

  • ...Because of the collaboration between Ralph Waldo Emerson and Charles Elliot, former president of Harvard, and their push to elevate the status and prestige of higher education, universities became a more valuable proving ground in the recruitment and selection of employees for many fields (Brubacher & Rudy, 1997; Wilson, 1996)....

    [...]

  • ...Though, northern philanthropists promoted a genuine desire aid in Reconstruction, the reformation of the South, and establish and increase the economic power of African Americans in the South (Anderson & Moss, 1999)....

    [...]

  • ...In response to the explosion of schools created to educate African Americans, Southern Whites limited or cut off access to resources such as funding, supplies, and books (Duster, 2009; Watkins, 2001)....

    [...]

  • ...Though hesitant, Southern states accepted and acknowledged the building of institutions for African Americans since it provided the much-desired separation and prohibited the intermingling of African Americans and Whites (Duster, 2009)....

    [...]

19 Sep 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, a qualitative research study revealed that low pay and other career choices are barriers for African-American males who wish to enter K-12 education and they suggested that, by improving the recruiting process and offering financial incentives, more African American males would seek to be in education.
Abstract: The minority teacher shortage exists in all schools and 40% of public schools have no teachers of color. Even the high-poverty and urban schools, which employ a higher number of minority teachers, are still staffed with predominantly Caucasian female teachers. The purpose of this comparative case study analysis was to see how barriers, motivation, recruitment and retention, and lived experiences of African-American males affect their presence in K-12 education. This qualitative research study revealed that low pay and other career choices are barriers for African-American males who wish to enter K-12 education. Intrinsic motivation which includes the desire to be role models and the desire to help others were found to be motivators for African-American males who sought to be in K-12 education. Recruiting organizations, such as Call Me Mister, are in existence to help attract more African-American males into K-12 education. The lived experiences of African-American male teachers revealed that AfricanAmerican males were absent yet needed in K-12 education and they suggested that, by improving the recruiting process and offering financial incentives, more African-American males would enter K-12 education. The theoretical framework that drove this research was Critical Race Theory which is a theory that examines how race, racism, and power functions in the school systems. With reasons

12 citations

01 Jan 2019
Abstract: Many scholarly works have focused on the problems that Black males face in higher education at predominantly White institutions (PWI). However, few have explored specific factors that lead to the success of Black males. This study focuses on the Multicultural Center’s role in Black male success at PWI. There are a myriad of issues that Black men face when pursuing higher education ranging from a lack of financial resources to “invisibility” in the collegial environment. These challenges are further exacerbated for Black men who are enrolled at a PWI. The Multicultural Center (MC) is among the essential modalities that can be used by Black men in college to cope with and overcome the often stubborn and burdensome challenges that accompany their post-secondary education experience. The purpose of the study was to examine how participating in academic and social programs offered by the MC at a PWI aid in the success of Black male students. The research questions were predicated on the ways that Black men navigate the academic and social collegiate challenges at a PWI and how the MC helps in this regard. The theoretical frameworks for the study included PVEST, Social Cognitive Theory, and Tinto’s Model of Integration. In keeping with the qualitative approach and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis methodology, a sample of 7 Black male participants was chosen by purposive sampling. Interviews and a focus group discussion were then conducted after receipt of their informed consent. Data were transcribed and coded. The main conclusion of the study was that the MC assisted the Black male students at the PWI in a social sense. Accordingly, it is recommended that the Black male students re-examine their mind-set about realities at the PWI and their (non) interaction with White peers and White faculty for optimizing academic advancement. Furthermore, senior-level administrators of the PWI should take the particular challenges of Black males into consideration, and review the operation and funding of the MC, so as to make effectual changes for benefiting Black male students. INDEX WORDS: Black male college students, Predominantly white institutions (PWIs), Multicultural center (MC) THE MULTICULTURAL CENTER’S ROLE IN BLACK MALE SUCCESS AT A PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTION

11 citations


Cites methods from "Encyclopedia of African American Ed..."

  • ...Predominantly White Institution (PWI)- PWI refers to the term used to describe institutions of higher learning in which Whites account for 50% or greater of the student enrollment (Lomotey, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...Predominantly White Institution (PWI)- PWI refers to the term used to describe institutions of higher learning in which Whites account for 50% or greater of the student enrollment (Lomotey, 2010)....

    [...]

References
More filters
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, an interpretive study of African American female elementary principals' experiences in a Southeastern public urban school district was conducted, focusing on the career pathway to the principalship in urban public elementary schools.
Abstract: This study is an interpretive study of African American female elementary principals’ experiences in a Southeastern public urban school district. The purpose of this interpretive research is to specifically examine five African American female principals’ perceptions of supports and barriers on the career pathway to the principalship in urban public elementary schools. The questions for this research included: How do African American females experience the process of becoming elementary school principals in a Southeastern, urban district? How have African American female principals described their experiences with educational institutions, communities and professional organizations? Tillman and Lomotey’s research is used to explain the significance of African American principal leadership in the elementary K-12 setting after Brown v Board of Education. According to Jean-Marie (2013), even though all leaders within educational institutions face numerous challenges in terms of achieving success, African American female principals often face unique challenges that are linked to their own cultural background. This research supports work from Schwandt (1994), who explained that an interpretative lens focuses on worldview values and embraces subjective interpretation while acknowledging such interpretations are socially constructed and therefore, shaped by the researcher’s own stand or position on a topic. The participants shared stories of experiences, supports from their family, spirituality, and community connection. The data provided evidence that life experiences, educational background, and educational programs informed the analysis of the career pathway to the elementary principalship.

14 citations

19 Sep 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, a qualitative research study revealed that low pay and other career choices are barriers for African-American males who wish to enter K-12 education and they suggested that, by improving the recruiting process and offering financial incentives, more African American males would seek to be in education.
Abstract: The minority teacher shortage exists in all schools and 40% of public schools have no teachers of color. Even the high-poverty and urban schools, which employ a higher number of minority teachers, are still staffed with predominantly Caucasian female teachers. The purpose of this comparative case study analysis was to see how barriers, motivation, recruitment and retention, and lived experiences of African-American males affect their presence in K-12 education. This qualitative research study revealed that low pay and other career choices are barriers for African-American males who wish to enter K-12 education. Intrinsic motivation which includes the desire to be role models and the desire to help others were found to be motivators for African-American males who sought to be in K-12 education. Recruiting organizations, such as Call Me Mister, are in existence to help attract more African-American males into K-12 education. The lived experiences of African-American male teachers revealed that AfricanAmerican males were absent yet needed in K-12 education and they suggested that, by improving the recruiting process and offering financial incentives, more African-American males would enter K-12 education. The theoretical framework that drove this research was Critical Race Theory which is a theory that examines how race, racism, and power functions in the school systems. With reasons

12 citations

01 Jan 2019
Abstract: Many scholarly works have focused on the problems that Black males face in higher education at predominantly White institutions (PWI). However, few have explored specific factors that lead to the success of Black males. This study focuses on the Multicultural Center’s role in Black male success at PWI. There are a myriad of issues that Black men face when pursuing higher education ranging from a lack of financial resources to “invisibility” in the collegial environment. These challenges are further exacerbated for Black men who are enrolled at a PWI. The Multicultural Center (MC) is among the essential modalities that can be used by Black men in college to cope with and overcome the often stubborn and burdensome challenges that accompany their post-secondary education experience. The purpose of the study was to examine how participating in academic and social programs offered by the MC at a PWI aid in the success of Black male students. The research questions were predicated on the ways that Black men navigate the academic and social collegiate challenges at a PWI and how the MC helps in this regard. The theoretical frameworks for the study included PVEST, Social Cognitive Theory, and Tinto’s Model of Integration. In keeping with the qualitative approach and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis methodology, a sample of 7 Black male participants was chosen by purposive sampling. Interviews and a focus group discussion were then conducted after receipt of their informed consent. Data were transcribed and coded. The main conclusion of the study was that the MC assisted the Black male students at the PWI in a social sense. Accordingly, it is recommended that the Black male students re-examine their mind-set about realities at the PWI and their (non) interaction with White peers and White faculty for optimizing academic advancement. Furthermore, senior-level administrators of the PWI should take the particular challenges of Black males into consideration, and review the operation and funding of the MC, so as to make effectual changes for benefiting Black male students. INDEX WORDS: Black male college students, Predominantly white institutions (PWIs), Multicultural center (MC) THE MULTICULTURAL CENTER’S ROLE IN BLACK MALE SUCCESS AT A PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTION

11 citations