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Entstehung und Entwicklung des Rechtsextremismus in der Bundesrepublik

About: The article was published on 1984-01-01. It has received 66 citations till now.
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Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The extreme right party family as discussed by the authors is a family of extreme right parties in western Europe, defined by the concept of the party family and the extreme right ideology, which is studied in this paper.
Abstract: The extreme right party family - the concept of the party family, the study of extreme right parties, putting the extreme right party family to the test studying party ideology, outline of the book. Part 1 Germany - Deutschland Den Deutschen! the extreme right in Germany, 1945-80: Die Republikaner - the ups and downs of a discorded party, profiling the literature, from national conservatism to extreme right, conclusion Die Deutsche Volksunion - the whims of an extreme right businessman, profiling the literature, Deutschland uber Alles! conclusion. Part 2 Flanders -Eigen Volk Eerst! the extreme right in Flanders, 1917-80: Vlaams Blok - the establishment of an anti-establishment party, profiling the literature, for a free and Flemish Flanders! conclusion. Part 3 The Netherlands - Nederland Voor de Nederlanders! the extreme right in the Netherlands, 1945-84: Centrumdemocraten - Janmaat - right or wrong! profiling the literature, the Netherlands for the Dutch first! conclusion Centrumpartij'86 - reservoir of the fringe, profiling the literature, in search of an identity conclusion comparative perspectives -comparing the literature, evaluating the analysis, comparing the ideology, the extreme right party family - fact or fiction? final thoughts. Appendices and literature: a list of extreme right parties in western Europe ideological features and themes. Cited primary and secondary literature.

420 citations


Cites background from "Entstehung und Entwicklung des Rech..."

  • ...2 For an overview of the histories of these parties, see the relevant chapters in Tauber (1967); Stöss (1983/84); Dudek and Jaschke (1984)....

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  • ...In the late 1960s the government indicated on several occasions that it was considering a constitutional ban of the party because of its alleged extremist character (Dudek and Jaschke 1984)....

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  • ...The mere threat of a ban appeared to have been effective, not only outside of the party (scaring away possible voters) but even within (Dudek and Jaschke 1984)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, right-wing extremism in post-war Europe is discussed. But the authors focus on the right wing extremists in Western Europe and do not address the role of Islamism in Islamization.
Abstract: (1988). Right‐wing extremism in post‐war Europe. West European Politics: Vol. 11, Right‐Wing Extremism in Western Europe, pp. 1-18.

159 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Cas Mudde1
TL;DR: In this paper, the so-called third wave of right-wing extremism has taken both society and social science by storm, and a comparative analysis of the ideologies of the three alleged rightwing extremist parties (the Dutch CP'86, the German NPD and the Austrian NDP) is presented.
Abstract: . The so-called ‘third wave’ of right-wing extremism has taken both society and social science by storm. In contrast to the many studies that look for possible explanations for the success of this ‘wave’, this article focusses on right-wing extremism itself. In the first part, the concept is defined on the basis of the existing literature, as a political ideology that consists of a combination of several features. In the second part, these features are first conceptualized and second used in a comparative analysis of the ideologies of three alleged right-wing extremist parties (the Dutch CP'86, the German NPD and the Austrian NDP). This analysis shows a more differentiated picture of the ideology of this ‘party family’, and is a warning against too careless generalisations.

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, some major theories in sociology and social psychology that might be applicable to political racism are described and their respective usefulness is assessed on the basis of available evidence about support for political racism in four west European countries.
Abstract: . The concept of political racism is necessarily more specific than the more universal concepts of racism used in social science outside the sphere of politics. Thus, despite the common tendency to explain political racism using theories developed to account for other forms of racism, one turns most profitably to a range of political factors operating differently in time and/or location in order to arrive at the most thorough understanding of the expression of political racism. However, that does not deny the relevance of certain theories of more general racism in recognizing those circumstances that predispose to political racism. Some major theories in sociology and social psychology that might be applicable to political racism are described and their respective usefulness is assessed on the basis of available evidence about support for political racism in four west European countries.

66 citations

Book
14 Mar 2019
TL;DR: Rosenfeld as mentioned in this paper explores the universalization of the Fourth Reich by left-wing radicals in the 1960s, its transformation into a source of pop culture entertainment in the 1970s, and its embrace by authoritarian populists and neo-Nazis seeking to attack the European Union since the year 2000.
Abstract: Ever since the collapse of the Third Reich, anxieties have persisted about Nazism's revival in the form of a Fourth Reich. Gavriel D. Rosenfeld reveals, for the first time, these postwar nightmares of a future that never happened and explains what they tell us about Western political, intellectual, and cultural life. He shows how postwar German history might have been very different without the fear of the Fourth Reich as a mobilizing idea to combat the right-wing forces that genuinely threatened the country's democratic order. He then explores the universalization of the Fourth Reich by left-wing radicals in the 1960s, its transformation into a source of pop culture entertainment in the 1970s, and its embrace by authoritarian populists and neo-Nazis seeking to attack the European Union since the year 2000. This is a timely analysis of a concept that is increasingly relevant in an era of surging right-wing politics.

44 citations