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Book ChapterDOI

Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur

01 Jan 2012-pp 1-517
TL;DR: In judischen theosophischen und kabbalistischen Vorstellungen von der Antike bis in die Neuzeit, wurde das hebraische Alphabet (Alef-Bet) nicht nur als graphisches Reprasentationssystem der hebraischen Sprache (↗Hebraisch) aufgefasst, sondern galt auch als Trager von symbolischen and metaphysischen Bedeutungen as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In judischen theosophischen und kabbalistischen Vorstellungen von der Antike bis in die Neuzeit wurde das hebraische Alphabet (Alef-Bet) nicht nur als graphisches Reprasentationssystem der hebraischen Sprache (↗Hebraisch) aufgefasst, sondern galt auch als Trager von symbolischen und metaphysischen Bedeutungen. Mit der Heiligkeit (↗Kadosh) der hebraischen Buchstaben korrespondierte die Stellung von Schreibern heiliger Texte in Antike und Mittelalter, aber auch die Entwicklung von Drucklettern (!Buchdruck). Vor dem Hintergrund der Modernisierung wurde in der judischen Literatur und bildenden Kunst das hebraische Alphabet als letzter Ort der go ttlichen Kraft und gelegentlich der judischen Existenz transzendiert.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A controversial examination of the Jewish success story in American that questions notions of identity, assimilation, and ethnicity is presented in this article, where the authors present a series of essays.
Abstract: A controversial examination of the Jewish success story in American that questions notions of identity, assimilation, and ethnicity.

48 citations

References
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Book
15 Sep 2010
TL;DR: Moyn as discussed by the authors argues that it was in the decade after 1968 that human rights began to make sense to broad communities of people as the proper cause of justice, as international law became an alternative to popular struggle and bloody violence.
Abstract: Human rights offer a vision of international justice that today's idealistic millions hold dear. Yet the very concept on which the movement is based became familiar only a few decades ago when it profoundly reshaped our hopes for an improved humanity. In this pioneering book, Samuel Moyn elevates that extraordinary transformation to center stage and asks what it reveals about the ideal's troubled present and uncertain future. For some, human rights stretch back to the dawn of Western civilization, the age of the American and French Revolutions, or the post - World War II moment when the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was framed. Revisiting these episodes in a dramatic tour of humanity's moral history, "The Last Utopia" shows that it was in the decade after 1968 that human rights began to make sense to broad communities of people as the proper cause of justice. Across eastern and western Europe, as well as throughout the United States and Latin America, human rights crystallized in a few short years as social activism and political rhetoric moved it from the hallways of the United Nations to the global forefront. It was on the ruins of earlier political utopias, Moyn argues, that human rights achieved contemporary prominence. The morality of individual rights substituted for the soiled political dreams of revolutionary communism and nationalism as international law became an alternative to popular struggle and bloody violence. But as the ideal of human rights enters into rival political agendas, it requires more vigilance and scrutiny than when it became the watchword of our hopes.

1,193 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and non-citizens and examine how the concept of citizenship has been used to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare.
Abstract: In order to distinguish between those who may and may not enter or leave, states everywhere have developed extensive systems of identification, central to which is the passport. This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and non-citizens. It examines how the concept of citizenship has been used to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. It focuses on the US and Western Europe, moving from revolutionary France to the Napoleonic era, the American Civil War, the British industrial revolution, pre-World War I Italy, the reign of Germany's Third Reich and beyond. This innovative study combines theory and empirical data in questioning how and why states have established the exclusive right to authorize and regulate the movement of people.

911 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The 20th-anniversary edition of "The Blackening of America: Popular Culture and National Cultures" by Greil Marcus as mentioned in this paper was the first publication of the book.
Abstract: Preface to the 20th-Anniversary Edition by Greil Marcus Introduction Part I 1. Blackface and Blackness: The Minstrel Show in American Culture 2. Love and Theft: "Racial" Production and the Social Unconscious of Blackface 3. White Kids and No Kids At All: Working Class Culture and Languages of Race 4. The Blackening of America: Popular Culture and National Cultures Part II 5. "The Seeming Counterfeit": Early Blackface Acts, the Body, and Social Contradiction 6. "Genuine Negro Fun": Racial Pleasure and Class Formation in the 1840's 7. California Gold and European Revolution: Stephen Foster and the American 1848 8. Uncle Tomitudes: Racial Melodrama and Modes of Production Afterword to the 20th-Anniversary Edition by the Author Notes Bibliography Index

879 citations