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Equity theory predictions of the effects of participation in justice or Police studies on the promotional expectations of members of the Western Australian Police Force

01 Jan 1995-
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated possible links between the factors of higher education and merit-based promotion and found that student officers placed a higher value on education for basic police work and managerial ranks.
Abstract: Before 1988 police in this State were promoted solely on seniority. No university ..::curses for officers existed locally and education played little part in promotion. Promotion is now on the basis of merit and Edith Cowan University conducts courses in Police and Justice Studies. This study investigates possible links between the factors of higher education and merit based promotion. Predictions of student officers' of the benefits of higher education, organisational commitment and various aspecta of non-promotion were exa:a1.ined by use of a questionnaire. The results showed that student officers placed a higher value on education for basic police work and managerial ranks. They 3lso considered that they should receive preference for promC'tion over officers without degrees. There was no differences in current levels of organisational commitment but student officers appeared more likely to experience greater reductions in work effort and desire to remain with the Force if not promoted. They were also found to place greater value on positions using their qualifications as compensation for lack of promotion. Problems and suggested solutions arising from these findings are discussed. . ;Jnf.J11A,~ jqqS Signature ... ... Date ................. !.~ . .':":-.:::-:(. ............. ; ...... .

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01 Jul 1973
Abstract: Abstract : A study is reported of the variations in organizational commitment and job satisfaction, as related to subsequent turnover in a sample of recently-employed psychiatric technician trainees. A longitudinal study was made across a 10 1/2 month period, with attitude measures collected at four points in time. For this sample, job satisfaction measures appeared better able to differentiate future stayers from leavers in the earliest phase of the study. With the passage of time, organizational commitment measures proved to be a better predictor of turnover, and job satisfaction failed to predict turnover. The findings are discussed in the light of other related studies, and possible explanations are examined. (Modified author abstract)

497 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose to start early in making arrangements and to rely on the accuracy of a clock in any building visited, for it can let you down badly, and they also suggest that planning to deal with them which are the product of much cogitation are much more likely to be effective than those made hurriedly.
Abstract: is: never rely on the accuracy of a clock in any building visited, for it can let you down badly. One other piece of advice is tendered, namely, to start early in making arrangements. True, by doing so one is apt to keep putting off dealing with some matters because there is so very much time available, so that the title \"Operation Procrastination\" becomes merited. On the other hand, an adequate margin of time allows for delays, some unavoidable and some culpable, by others. Moreover, time for reflection enables all foreseeable implications and contingencies to become apparent, and plans to deal with them which are the product of much cogitation are much more likely to be effective than those made hurriedly. And now that the many appreciatory letters to the police have been suitably acknowledged and passed to those who earned them, and the letters of thanks have been despatched to the various persons who helped the police, all that remains is to consign the substantial file that has accumulated to the archives. I wonder who, in perhaps another dozen years or so, will be getting it out to see what sort of a mess those fellows made of things in 1954?

17 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1957
TL;DR: Cognitive dissonance theory links actions and attitudes as discussed by the authors, which holds that dissonance is experienced whenever one cognition that a person holds follows from the opposite of at least one other cognition that the person holds.
Abstract: Cognitive dissonance theory links actions and attitudes It holds that dissonance is experienced whenever one cognition that a person holds follows from the opposite of at least one other cognition that the person holds The magnitude of dissonance is directly proportional to the number of discrepant cognitions and inversely proportional to the number of consonant cognitions that a person has The relative weight of any discrepant or consonant element is a function of its Importance

22,553 citations

Book ChapterDOI
J. Stacy Adams1
TL;DR: The concept of relative deprivation and relative gratification as discussed by the authors are two major concepts relating to the perception of justice and injustice in social exchanges, and both of them can be used to describe the conditions that lead men to feel that their relations with others are just.
Abstract: Publisher Summary The process of exchange is almost continual in human interactions, and appears to have characteristics peculiar to itself, and to generate affect, motivation, and behavior that cannot be predicted unless exchange processes are understood. This chapter describes two major concepts relating to the perception of justice and injustice; the concept of relative deprivation and the complementary concept of relative gratification. All dissatisfaction and low morale are related to a person's suffering injustice in social exchanges. However, a significant portion of cases can be usefully explained by invoking injustice as an explanatory concept. In the theory of inequity, both the antecedents and consequences of perceived injustice have been stated in terms that permit quite specific predictions to be made about the behavior of persons entering social exchanges. Relative deprivation and distributive justice, as theoretical concepts, specify some of the conditions that arouse perceptions of injustice and complementarily, the conditions that lead men to feel that their relations with others are just. The need for much additional research notwithstanding, the theoretical analyses that have been made of injustice in social exchanges should result not only in a better general understanding of the phenomenon, but should lead to a degree of social control not previously possible. The experience of injustice need not be an accepted fact of life.

9,692 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study of the variations in organizational commitment and job satisfaction, as related to subsequent turnover in a sample of recently-employed psychiatric technician trainees, was reported.
Abstract: : A study is reported of the variations in organizational commitment and job satisfaction, as related to subsequent turnover in a sample of recently-employed psychiatric technician trainees. A longitudinal study was made across a 10 1/2 month period, with attitude measures collected at four points in time. For this sample, job satisfaction measures appeared better able to differentiate future stayers from leavers in the earliest phase of the study. With the passage of time, organizational commitment measures proved to be a better predictor of turnover, and job satisfaction failed to predict turnover. The findings are discussed in the light of other related studies, and possible explanations are examined. (Modified author abstract)

5,680 citations

Book
29 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The open vs closed question debate: coding reponses to open questions and formulating sets of response options for closed questions as discussed by the authors has been studied in the context of question answering.
Abstract: Preface 1. An initial statement of the problem 2. A theoretical framework 3. Defining topics properly 4. Formulating intelligible requests for information 5. Contextual influences on respondent's interpretations of questions 6. The need to provide response frameworks 7. The limitations of human memory 8. Filters: establishing the relevance of questions to the respondents 9. Reducing question threat 10. The open vs closed question debate: coding reponses to open questions and formulating sets of response options for closed questions 11. Measuring attitudes 12. Checks to ensure that questions work as they are intended to work Conclusions References.

1,029 citations