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Journal Article

Ethics in engineering practice and research

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an introduction to ethical reasoning in engineering and the evaluation of acts in the field of science and technology, including the following: 1. Professional practice in engineering 2. Engineering Responsibility: 3. Ethics as design - doing justice to moral problems 4. Central professional responsibilities of engineers 5. Computers, software, and digital information 6. Rights and responsibilities regarding intellectual property 7. Responsible Research Conduct: 8. Ethics in the changing domain of research 9. The Future of Engineering: 10. Responsibility for the environment 11.
Abstract: Part I. Values and the Evaluation of Acts in Engineering: Introduction to Ethical Reasoning and Engineering Ethics: 1. Professional practice in engineering 2. Two examples of professional behavior: Roger Boisjoly and William Lemessurier Part II. Engineering Responsibility: 3. Ethics as design - doing justice to moral problems 4. Central professional responsibilities of engineers 5. Computers, software, and digital information 6. Rights and responsibilities regarding intellectual property 7. Workplace rights and responsibilities Part III. Responsible Research Conduct: 8. Ethics in the changing domain of research 9. Responsible authorship and credit in engineering and scientific research Part IV. The Future of Engineering: 10. Responsibility for the environment 11. End use and 'macro' issues.
Citations
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01 Jan 1982
Abstract: Introduction 1. Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle 2. Images of Relationship 3. Concepts of Self and Morality 4. Crisis and Transition 5. Women's Rights and Women's Judgment 6. Visions of Maturity References Index of Study Participants General Index

7,539 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Turkle is a public intellectual whose work as a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor of the social studies of science and technology is critically considered in this exploration of a single public presentation based on her 2015 book Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in the Digital Age as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Few academics who become public intellectuals have the opportunity to use their research findings to influence and direct public opinion Sherry Turkle is a public intellectual whose work as a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor of the social studies of science and technology is critically considered in this exploration of a single public presentation based on her 2015 book Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in the Digital Age Drawing deeply on subjective observations, Turkle performs public ethnography, using her knowledge and practice as a psychologist to create what she has called “computer psychotherapy” This type of ethnographic practice operates within an agent-egoist model of performativity, which Turkle uses to establish her opposition to student use of laptops and social media in classrooms Arguing in favor of and thereby privileging classroom conversation, Turkle misses the challenge of rendering creative pedagogical options for millennials in the context of their enriched, always-on digital lives As a public intellectual, she fails to assist the public and educators explore collective and progressive options to technology within emerging forms of pedagogy

10 citations

Book
01 Jul 1979
TL;DR: The legal system of the United States State and Federal Laws and Regulatory Agencies Basic Concepts of Product Liability Law Product Lability Evolution Reducing Product Littability Risk Product Lettability Insurance Product LIT Litigation Engineering and Ethics The Role of Engineering Education The Unreasonably Dangerous Product
Abstract: Introduction The Legal System of the United States State and Federal Laws and Regulatory Agencies Basic Concepts of Product Liability Law Product Liability Evolution Reducing Product Liability Risk Product Liability Insurance Product Liability Litigation Engineering and Ethics The Role of Engineering Education The Unreasonably Dangerous Product

10 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Senge's Fifth Discipline is a set of principles for building a "learning organization" as discussed by the authors, where people expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nutured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are contually learning together.
Abstract: Peter Senge, founder and director of the Society for Organisational Learning and senior lecturer at MIT, has found the means of creating a 'learning organisation'. In The Fifth Discipline, he draws the blueprints for an organisation where people expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nutured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are contually learning together. The Fifth Discipline fuses these features together into a coherent body of theory and practice, making the whole of an organisation more effective than the sum of its parts. Mastering the disciplines will: *Reignite the spark of learning, driven by people focused on what truly matters to them. *Bridge teamwork into macro-creativity. *Free you from confining assumptions and mind-sets. *Teach you to see the forest and the trees. *End the struggle between work and family time. The Fifth Discipline is a remarkable book that draws on science, spiritual values, psychology, the cutting edge of management thought and Senge's work with leading companies which employ Fifth Discipline methods. Reading it provides a searching personal experience and a dramatic professional shift of mind. This edition contains more than 100 pages of new material about how companies are actually using and benefiting from Fifth Discipline practices, as well as a new foreword from Peter Senge about his work with the Fifth Discipline over the last 15 years.

16,386 citations

Book
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: The principles of biomedical and Islamic medical ethics and an interfaith perspective on end-of-life issues and three cases to exemplify some of the conflicts in ethical decision-making are discussed.
Abstract: Morality and ethical theory types of ethical theory the principle of respect for autonomy the principle of nonmaleficence the principle of beneficence the principle of justice professional-patient relationships ideals, virtues and conscientiousness.

13,200 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: Young as mentioned in this paper argues that normative theory and public policy should undermine group-based oppression by affirming rather than suppressing social group difference, and argues for a principle of group representation in democratic publics and for group-differentiated policies.
Abstract: This book challenges the prevailing philosophical reduction of social justice to distributive justice. It critically analyzes basic concepts underlying most theories of justice, including impartiality, formal equality, and the unitary moral subjectivity. Starting from claims of excluded groups about decision making, cultural expression, and division of labor, Iris Young defines concepts of domination and oppression to cover issues eluding the distributive model. Democratic theorists, according to Young do not adequately address the problem of an inclusive participatory framework. By assuming a homogeneous public, they fail to consider institutional arrangements for including people not culturally identified with white European male norms of reason and respectability. Young urges that normative theory and public policy should undermine group-based oppression by affirming rather than suppressing social group difference. Basing her vision of the good society on the differentiated, culturally plural network of contemporary urban life, she argues for a principle of group representation in democratic publics and for group-differentiated policies. "This is an innovative work, an important contribution to feminist theory and political thought, and one of the most impressive statements of the relationship between postmodernist critiques of universalism and concrete thinking.... Iris Young makes the most convincing case I know of for the emancipatory implications of postmodernism." --Seyla Benhabib, State University of New York at Stony Brook

7,816 citations

01 Jan 1982
Abstract: Introduction 1. Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle 2. Images of Relationship 3. Concepts of Self and Morality 4. Crisis and Transition 5. Women's Rights and Women's Judgment 6. Visions of Maturity References Index of Study Participants General Index

7,539 citations

Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: Nagel as mentioned in this paper argues that our divided nature is the root of a whole range of philosophical problems, touching, as it does, every aspect of human life, and deals with its manifestations in such fields of philosophy as: the mind-body problem, personal identity, knowledge and skepticism, thought and reality, free will, ethics, the relation between moral and other values, the meaning of life and death.
Abstract: Human beings have the unique ability to view the world in a detached way: We can think about the world in terms that transcend our own experience or interest, and consider the world from a vantage point that is, in Nagel's words, "nowhere in particular." At the same time, each of us is a particular person in a particular place, each with his own "personal" view of the world, a view that we can recognize as just one aspect of the whole. How do we reconcile these two standpoints--intellectually, morally, and practically? To what extent are they irreconcilable and to what extent can they be integrated? Thomas Nagel's ambitious and lively book tackles this fundamental issue, arguing that our divided nature is the root of a whole range of philosophical problems, touching, as it does, every aspect of human life. He deals with its manifestations in such fields of philosophy as: the mind-body problem, personal identity, knowledge and skepticism, thought and reality, free will, ethics, the relation between moral and other values, the meaning of life, and death. Excessive objectification has been a malady of recent analytic philosophy, claims Nagel, it has led to implausible forms of reductionism in the philosophy of mind and elsewhere. The solution is not to inhibit the objectifying impulse, but to insist that it learn to live alongside the internal perspectives that cannot be either discarded or objectified. Reconciliation between the two standpoints, in the end, is not always possible.

3,194 citations