scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Exoprotease production by sporogenous and asporogenous mycobacillin non-producer mutants ofBacillus subtilis

01 Jan 1979-Folia Microbiologica (Folia Microbiol (Praha))-Vol. 24, Iss: 5, pp 373-375
TL;DR: Mycobacillin non-producers, whether sporogenous or asporogenous, possess less exoprotease, but effsotive exoproteinase producers are not always good myc Cobacillin yielders.
Abstract: Mycobacillin non-producers, whether sporogenous or asporogenous, possess less exoprotease, but effsotive exoprotease producers are not always good mycobacillin yielders. There might exist a minimum level of exoprotease formation for elaboration of mycobacillin.
Citations
More filters
Book ChapterDOI
Vedpal S. Malik1
TL;DR: The genetics of secondary metabolism and sporulation is more complex than the genetics of growth because the expression of genes involved in these processes is superimposed on theexpression of the logarithmic phase genes.
Abstract: Publisher Summary Synthesis of a secondary metabolite is a highly ordered and coordinated event. The enzymes associated with secondary metabolites can be divided into four classes— (1) primary metabolism that yield the precursors of secondary metabolism, (2) those that are specific for the synthesis of the secondary metabolites, (3) those that provide energy or cofactors, and (4) those that further metabolize the produced metabolite. The formation of many secondary metabolites occurs by multistep processes catalyzed by multienzyme complexes that usually are produced only during a certain growth phase. Thus, some of the antibiotic-synthesizing enzymes are induced during a short period at the end of the logarithmic growth and the onset of the stationary phase. The genetics of secondary metabolism and sporulation is more complex than the genetics of growth because the expression of genes involved in these processes is superimposed on the expression of the logarithmic phase genes. Sporulation and secondary metabolism are favored under similar growth conditions.

36 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The fact that a variety of metabolic alterations could lead to excessive protease production suggested that a common catabolic or biosynthetic intermediate was involved in the control of the production of this enzyme(s).
Abstract: Both sporulation and protease production can be inhibited by growing Bacillus cereus T in a medium containing a high concentration of a mixture of amino acids. Mutants selected for the ability to sporulate in this inhibitory medium were found to produce high levels of protease in the normal and inhibitory media. Comparison of the mutant and wild-type enzymes by gel electrophoresis and heat inactivation suggested that they were identical. One of the mutants proved to be a purine-requiring auxotroph. Reversion to prototrophy resulted in the loss of the capacity to sporulate in the inhibitory medium and loss of the ability to produce large amounts of protease. Mutants capable of producing high levels of protease and of sporulating in the inhibitory medium were also found when selecting for a purine, pyrimidine, or lysine requirement or for the capacity to sporulate in the presence of a high concentration of glucose. Protease production could be considerably delayed in the purine auxotrophs or completely inhibited in the pyrimidine auxotrophs by growing the cells in a medium containing the inhibitory mixture of amino acids plus hypoxanthine for the former or a pyrimidine for the latter. The fact that a variety of metabolic alterations could lead to excessive protease production suggested that a common catabolic or biosynthetic intermediate was involved in the control of the production of this enzyme(s).

89 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the B. licheniformis enzyme to determine whether its activity is consistent with a possible funct,ion in the sporulative events of the cell that produces it.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The time required for production of bacitracin has been shortened from 3 to 6 days to 24 hr., and a working hypothesis for the mechanism of biosynthesis of this polypeptide antibiotic has been proposed.

57 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
P. Schaeffer1

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The spores ofStreptomycin-resistant or adenine-requiring mutants of Bacillus subtilis may be producers, feeble producers or non-producers, of mycobacillin, an antifungal polypeptide antibiotic, but they all form spores including even the myc Cobacillin-negative mutants.
Abstract: Streptomycin-resistant or adenine-requiring mutants of Bacillus subtilis may be producers, feeble producers or non-producers, of mycobacillin, an antifungal polypeptide antibiotic, but they all form spores including even the mycobacillin-negative mutants. The spores were characterized by dipicolinic acid content, spore staining, heat resistance (80°, 15min), and germination.

24 citations