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Journal Article

Experimental study of synthetic-fibre-reinforced cementitious composites

TL;DR: In this paper, the tensile properties of concrete reinforced with acrylic, nylon, and aramid fibres, in the form of random distribution or unioxial alignment, were studied by means of three different tests: compact tension, flexural and splitting tensile tests.
Abstract: Fibre reinforcement is one of the effective ways of improving the properties of concrete. However, current studios on fibre -reinforced concrete (FRC) have focused mainly on reinforcements with steel and glass fibres. Thin paper reports on an experimental programme on the properties of various synthetic fibre reinforced cementitious composites and the properties of the reinforcing fibres. Acrylic, polyester, and aramid fibres were tested in uniaxial tension, both in their original state as we!! as after ageing in nerO*nL Samples of these fibres were found to lose varying amounts of strength with time, depending on the ageing temperature. Two different test methods were used to measure the fibre-cement interfacial bond strength. The tensile properties of concrete reinforced with acrylic, nylon, and aramid fibres, in the form of random distribution or unioxial alignment, were studied by means of three different tests: compact tension, flexural, and splitting tensile tests. The properties of concrete, particularly that of apparent ductility, were found to be greatly improved by the inclusion of such fibre reinforcement.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, it is suggested that for effective use of the reinforcing fibres, fiber bundling should be minimized and the fibre/matrix bond property should be controlled. But, the results of the experiments were limited by the strength of the cement matrix at high angles due to matrix spalling.

370 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the performance of concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) and polypropylene rubber (PPB) has been investigated and the effect of waste treatments, the size of waste particles and the waste replacement volume on the fresh and hardened properties of concrete.

367 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a comprehensive review of the mechanism of crack formation and propagation, compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength (TS), flexural strength, drying shrinkage, creep, electrical resistance, and chloride migration resistance of high performance fiber reinforced concrete.
Abstract: In recent years, an emerging technology termed, “High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC)” has become popular in the construction industry. The materials used in HPFRC depend on the desired characteristics and the availability of suitable local economic alternative materials. Concrete is a common building material, generally weak in tension, often ridden with cracks due to plastic and drying shrinkage. The introduction of short discrete fibers into the concrete can be used to counteract and prevent the propagation of cracks. Despite an increase in interest to use HPFRC in concrete structures, some doubts still remain regarding the effect of fibers on the properties of concrete. This paper presents the most comprehensive review to date on the mechanical, physical, and durability-related features of concrete. Specifically, this literature review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the mechanism of crack formation and propagation, compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, stress–strain behavior, tensile strength (TS), flexural strength, drying shrinkage, creep, electrical resistance, and chloride migration resistance of HPFRC. In general, the addition of fibers in high-performance concrete has been proven to improve the mechanical properties of concrete, particularly the TS, flexural strength, and ductility performance. Furthermore, incorporation of fibers in concrete results in reductions in the shrinkage and creep deformations of concrete. However, it has been shown that fibers may also have negative effects on some properties of concrete, such as the workability, which get reduced with the addition of steel fibers. The addition of fibers, particularly steel fibers, due to their conductivity leads to a significant reduction in the electrical resistivity of the concrete, and it also results in some reduction in the chloride penetration resistance of the concrete.

350 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a micromechanical model has been formulated for the post-cracking behavior of a brittle matrix composite reinforced with randomly distributed short fibers, which incorporates the mechanics of pull-out of fibers which are inclined at an angle to the matrix crack plane and which undergo slip-weakening or sliphardening during the pullout process.
Abstract: A micromechanical model has been formulated for the post-cracking behavior of a brittle matrix composite reinforced with randomly distributed short fibers. This model incorporates the mechanics of pull-out of fibers which are inclined at an angle to the matrix crack plane and which undergo slip-weakening or slip-hardening during the pull-out process. In addition, the random location and orientation of fibers are accounted for. Comparisons of model predictions of post-cracking tension-softening behavior with experimental data appear to support the validity of the model. The model is used to examine the effects of fiber length, snubbing friction coefficient and interfacial bond behavior on composite post-cracking tensile properties. The scaling of the bridging fracture toughening with material parameters is discussed.

304 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the use of recycled fibers from industrial or post-consumer waste offers additional advantages of waste reduction and resources conservation, which can effectively improve the toughness, shrinkage and durability characteristics of concrete.
Abstract: Fiber reinforcement can effectively improve the toughness, shrinkage, and durability characteristics of concrete. The use of recycled fibers from industrial or postconsumer waste offers additional advantages of waste reduction and resources conservation. This paper reviews some of the work on concrete reinforcement using recycled fibers, including tire cords/wires, carpet fibers, feather fibers, steel shavings, wood fibers from paper waste, and high density polyethylene. This paper also provides a summary of the properties and applications of concrete reinforced with these fibers.

233 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, it is suggested that for effective use of the reinforcing fibres, fiber bundling should be minimized and the fibre/matrix bond property should be controlled. But, the results of the experiments were limited by the strength of the cement matrix at high angles due to matrix spalling.

370 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the performance of concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) and polypropylene rubber (PPB) has been investigated and the effect of waste treatments, the size of waste particles and the waste replacement volume on the fresh and hardened properties of concrete.

367 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a comprehensive review of the mechanism of crack formation and propagation, compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength (TS), flexural strength, drying shrinkage, creep, electrical resistance, and chloride migration resistance of high performance fiber reinforced concrete.
Abstract: In recent years, an emerging technology termed, “High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC)” has become popular in the construction industry. The materials used in HPFRC depend on the desired characteristics and the availability of suitable local economic alternative materials. Concrete is a common building material, generally weak in tension, often ridden with cracks due to plastic and drying shrinkage. The introduction of short discrete fibers into the concrete can be used to counteract and prevent the propagation of cracks. Despite an increase in interest to use HPFRC in concrete structures, some doubts still remain regarding the effect of fibers on the properties of concrete. This paper presents the most comprehensive review to date on the mechanical, physical, and durability-related features of concrete. Specifically, this literature review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the mechanism of crack formation and propagation, compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, stress–strain behavior, tensile strength (TS), flexural strength, drying shrinkage, creep, electrical resistance, and chloride migration resistance of HPFRC. In general, the addition of fibers in high-performance concrete has been proven to improve the mechanical properties of concrete, particularly the TS, flexural strength, and ductility performance. Furthermore, incorporation of fibers in concrete results in reductions in the shrinkage and creep deformations of concrete. However, it has been shown that fibers may also have negative effects on some properties of concrete, such as the workability, which get reduced with the addition of steel fibers. The addition of fibers, particularly steel fibers, due to their conductivity leads to a significant reduction in the electrical resistivity of the concrete, and it also results in some reduction in the chloride penetration resistance of the concrete.

350 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a micromechanical model has been formulated for the post-cracking behavior of a brittle matrix composite reinforced with randomly distributed short fibers, which incorporates the mechanics of pull-out of fibers which are inclined at an angle to the matrix crack plane and which undergo slip-weakening or sliphardening during the pullout process.
Abstract: A micromechanical model has been formulated for the post-cracking behavior of a brittle matrix composite reinforced with randomly distributed short fibers. This model incorporates the mechanics of pull-out of fibers which are inclined at an angle to the matrix crack plane and which undergo slip-weakening or slip-hardening during the pull-out process. In addition, the random location and orientation of fibers are accounted for. Comparisons of model predictions of post-cracking tension-softening behavior with experimental data appear to support the validity of the model. The model is used to examine the effects of fiber length, snubbing friction coefficient and interfacial bond behavior on composite post-cracking tensile properties. The scaling of the bridging fracture toughening with material parameters is discussed.

304 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the use of recycled fibers from industrial or post-consumer waste offers additional advantages of waste reduction and resources conservation, which can effectively improve the toughness, shrinkage and durability characteristics of concrete.
Abstract: Fiber reinforcement can effectively improve the toughness, shrinkage, and durability characteristics of concrete. The use of recycled fibers from industrial or postconsumer waste offers additional advantages of waste reduction and resources conservation. This paper reviews some of the work on concrete reinforcement using recycled fibers, including tire cords/wires, carpet fibers, feather fibers, steel shavings, wood fibers from paper waste, and high density polyethylene. This paper also provides a summary of the properties and applications of concrete reinforced with these fibers.

233 citations