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Journal ArticleDOI

Exploratory information searching in the enterprise: A study of user satisfaction and task performance

01 Jan 2017-Vol. 68, Iss: 1, pp 77-96
TL;DR: Semistructured qualitative interviews with search staff from the defense, pharmaceutical, and aerospace sectors indicates the potential transferability of the finding that organizations may not know their search expertise levels.
Abstract: No prior research has been identified that investigates the causal factors for workplace exploratory search task performance. The impact of user, task, and environmental factors on user satisfaction and task performance was investigated through a mixed methods study with 26 experienced information professionals using enterprise search in an oil and gas enterprise. Some participants found 75% of high-value items, others found none, with an average of 27%. No association was found between self-reported search expertise and task performance, with a tendency for many participants to overestimate their search expertise. Successful searchers may have more accurate mental models of both search systems and the information space. Organizations may not have effective exploratory search task performance feedback loops, a lack of learning. This may be caused by management bias towards technology, not capability, a lack of systems thinking. Furthermore, organizations may not "know" they "don't know" their true level of search expertise, a lack of knowing. A metamodel is presented identifying the causal factors for workplace exploratory search task performance. Semistructured qualitative interviews with search staff from the defense, pharmaceutical, and aerospace sectors indicates the potential transferability of the finding that organizations may not know their search expertise levels.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Overall, the influence of information literacy is slightly stronger on exploitation than exploration, and the mutual positive effect suggests that information literacy enhances innovation ambidexterity in organizations.

48 citations

29 Apr 2016
TL;DR: The 4th edition of this popular text presents a comprehensive review of over a century of research on information behavior, and includes significant structural and content changes from earlier editions.
Abstract: The 4th edition of this popular text presents a comprehensive review of over a century of research on information behavior. It is intended for students in information studies and disciplines interested in research on information activities. Now co-authored, this new text includes significant structural and content changes from earlier editions.

47 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present methodological review assesses the current state of mixed methods research in LIS and provides guidance for future work and contributes to the discussion on how the discipline can further improve methodological rigor, research training, and reproducibility.

36 citations

References
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01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antecdent to perceived usefulness, as opposed to a parallel, direct determinant of system usage.

40,975 citations


"Exploratory information searching i..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Technology acceptance models (TAMs) focus on perceived usefulness and usability (Davis, 1989)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed and validated new scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user acceptance.
Abstract: Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research develops and validates new scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user acceptance. Definitions of these two variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity and then tested for reliability and construct validity in two studies involving a total of 152 users and four application programs. The measures were refined and streamlined, resulting in two six-item scales with reliabilities of .98 for usefulness and .94 for ease of use. The scales exhibited hgih convergent, discriminant, and factorial validity. Perceived usefulness was significnatly correlated with both self-reported current usage r = .63, Study 1) and self-predicted future usage r = .85, Study 2). Perceived ease of use was also significantly correlated with current usage r = .45, Study 1) and future usage r = .59, Study 2). In both studies, usefulness had a signficnatly greater correaltion with usage behavior than did ease of use. Regression analyses suggest that perceived ease of use may actually be a causal antecdent to perceived usefulness, as opposed to a parallel, direct determinant of system usage. Implications are drawn for future research on user acceptance.

40,720 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Considerations for Getting Started and Techniques for Achieving Theoretical Integration are presented.
Abstract: Part I: Introduction to Grounded Theory of Anselm Strauss Chapter 1: Inspiration and Background Chapter 2: Theoretical Foundations Chapter 3: Practical Considerations for Getting Started Chapter 4: Prelude to Analysis Chapter 5: Strategies for Qualitative Data Analysis Chapter 6: Memos and Diagrams Chapter 7: Theoretical Sampling Chapter 8: Context Chapter 9: Process Chapter 10: Techniques for Achieving Theoretical Integration Chapter 11: The Use of Computer Programs in Qualitative Data Analysis Part II: Research Demonstration Project Chapter 12 Open Coding: Identifying Concepts Chapter 13: Developing Concepts in Terms of Their Properties and Dimensions Chapter 14: Analyzing Data for Context Chapter 15: Bringing Process Into the Analysis Chapter 16: Integrating Categories Part III: Finishing the Research Project Chapter 17: Writing Theses, Monographs, and Dissertations, and Giving Talks About Your Research Chapter 18: Criteria for Evaluation Chapter 19: Student Questions and Answers

33,113 citations


"Exploratory information searching i..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Themes were also mapped from the qualitative survey data and interviews using an approach based on grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1998)....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present strategies for qualitative data analysis, including context, process and theoretical integration, and provide a criterion for evaluation of these strategies and answers to student questions and answers.
Abstract: Introduction -- Practical considerations -- Prelude to analysis -- Strategies for qualitative data analysis -- Introduction to context, process and theoretical integration -- Memos and diagrams -- Theoretical sampling -- Analyzing data for concepts -- Elaborating the analysis -- Analyzing data for context -- Bringing process into the analysis -- Integrating around a concept -- Writing theses, monographs, and giving talks -- Criterion for evaluation -- Student questions and answers to these.

31,251 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as mentioned in this paper is a unified model that integrates elements across the eight models, and empirically validate the unified model.
Abstract: Information technology (IT) acceptance research has yielded many competing models, each with different sets of acceptance determinants. In this paper, we (1) review user acceptance literature and discuss eight prominent models, (2) empirically compare the eight models and their extensions, (3) formulate a unified model that integrates elements across the eight models, and (4) empirically validate the unified model. The eight models reviewed are the theory of reasoned action, the technology acceptance model, the motivational model, the theory of planned behavior, a model combining the technology acceptance model and the theory of planned behavior, the model of PC utilization, the innovation diffusion theory, and the social cognitive theory. Using data from four organizations over a six-month period with three points of measurement, the eight models explained between 17 percent and 53 percent of the variance in user intentions to use information technology. Next, a unified model, called the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), was formulated, with four core determinants of intention and usage, and up to four moderators of key relationships. UTAUT was then tested using the original data and found to outperform the eight individual models (adjusted R2 of 69 percent). UTAUT was then confirmed with data from two new organizations with similar results (adjusted R2 of 70 percent). UTAUT thus provides a useful tool for managers needing to assess the likelihood of success for new technology introductions and helps them understand the drivers of acceptance in order to proactively design interventions (including training, marketing, etc.) targeted at populations of users that may be less inclined to adopt and use new systems. The paper also makes several recommendations for future research including developing a deeper understanding of the dynamic influences studied here, refining measurement of the core constructs used in UTAUT, and understanding the organizational outcomes associated with new technology use.

27,798 citations