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Journal ArticleDOI

Exploring illness beliefs about diabetes among individuals with type 2 diabetes

29 Oct 2014-International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)-Vol. 8, Iss: 4, pp 392-413
TL;DR: This paper explores illness beliefs among adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), studied in a clinical setting in the Indian context, and reveals numerous sub-themes relate to diabetes management.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore illness beliefs among adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), studied in a clinical setting in the Indian context. Diabetes management lies primarily in the hands of the patient, which signifies the need for understanding the various dimensions of individuals’ illness beliefs. While past research from abroad has stressed the need for understanding the patient’s perspective in effective illness management, the lack of studies in the Indian context calls for further research in this area. Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on the Self-Regulation Model (Leventhal et al., 1980), semi-structured interviews were carried out to understand the beliefs about diabetes among individuals diagnosed to have T2DM. In total, 70 individuals with T2DM were included, taking into account the disease duration, urban-rural, age and gender distinctions. The data were analyzed using content analysis method. Findings – The results of the analysis revealed numerous sub-themes relate...
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This thesis aims to demonstrate the efforts towards in-situ applicability of EMMARM, as to provide real-time information about the physical landscape of Indonesia and its people in the period of June-July of 1991.
Abstract: ....................................................................................................................... iii Acknowledgements ...................................................................................................... v Table of contents ......................................................................................................... xi List of tables ................................................................................................................. xv List of figures ............................................................................................................. xvii List of abbreviations................................................................................................... xxi Glossary .................................................................................................................... xxiii Section A – Introduction and literature review 1 Chapter 1: Introduction .......................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Background .......................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Aims of the thesis .............................................................................................................. 4 1.3 The researcher’s personal motivation for the topic ............................................ 5 1.4 Indonesia .............................................................................................................................. 7 1.5 Overview of study locations ........................................................................................ 16 1.6 Scope of the thesis ........................................................................................................... 24 1.7 Structure of the thesis ................................................................................................... 25 2 Chapter 2: Literature review .............................................................................................. 27 2.

19 citations


Cites result from "Exploring illness beliefs about dia..."

  • ...Indonesia, or officially the Republic of Indonesia, is a Southeast Asian nation situated between the continents of Asia and Australia, and between the Pacific and Indian Oceans....

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  • ...Most participants in this study were diagnosed late, and similar situations were also observed in Iran, and India [402, 403]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study showed that participants tried to understand diabetes based on their personal experiences, and saw the disease in a broader context of cultural identity and changes in their cultural environment.
Abstract: Background: Understanding perceptions and experiences of people with diabetes is important before establishing effective interventions. Previous research indicates that socio-cultural characteristics influence people's views about diabetes. Objective: This study aimed at understanding diabetes from the perspective of people with diabetes in the Indonesian cultural context. Methods: Six focus group discussions involving 45 people with diabetes were conducted in East Nusa Tenggara and West Sumatera. The discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim in their original language, translated into English, and analysed for common themes. Results: This study showed that participants tried to understand diabetes based on their personal experiences. They also saw the disease in a broader context of cultural identity and changes in their cultural environment. In coping with the disease, three strategies were identified: seeing it as beyond their control, normalising their condition, and resignation to God. People who used the first and second methods of coping tended to have a more negative response to diabetes treatment. People with strong religious beliefs coped more positively with diabetes. Conclusions: People with diabetes conceptualised the disease into their own narratives. These lay concepts influenced their strategies of coping and their behaviours in managing the disease. Understanding people's lay perceptions and experiences are important to develop personalised strategies of diabetes management that may influence people's responses to their disease and treatment.

6 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors delineate analytic procedures specific to each approach and techniques addressing trustworthiness with hypothetical examples drawn from the area of end-of-life care.
Abstract: Content analysis is a widely used qualitative research technique. Rather than being a single method, current applications of content analysis show three distinct approaches: conventional, directed, or summative. All three approaches are used to interpret meaning from the content of text data and, hence, adhere to the naturalistic paradigm. The major differences among the approaches are coding schemes, origins of codes, and threats to trustworthiness. In conventional content analysis, coding categories are derived directly from the text data. With a directed approach, analysis starts with a theory or relevant research findings as guidance for initial codes. A summative content analysis involves counting and comparisons, usually of keywords or content, followed by the interpretation of the underlying context. The authors delineate analytic procedures specific to each approach and techniques addressing trustworthiness with hypothetical examples drawn from the area of end-of-life care.

31,398 citations

Book
19 Apr 1994
TL;DR: A Framework for the Study Use of the Literature The Purpose Statement Questions, Objectives, and Hypotheses The Use of a Theory Definitions, Delimitations, and Significance A Quantitative Method A Qualitative Procedure Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Designs Scholarly Writing
Abstract: A Framework for the Study Use of the Literature The Introduction to the Study The Purpose Statement Questions, Objectives, and Hypotheses The Use of a Theory Definitions, Delimitations, and Significance A Quantitative Method A Qualitative Procedure Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Designs Scholarly Writing

7,471 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Qualitative Methodology and Health Research Developing Qualitative Research Designs Responsibilities, Ethics and Values Managing and Analysing data developing Qualitative Analysis.
Abstract: Qualitative methods for health research , Qualitative methods for health research , کتابخانه مرکزی دانشگاه علوم پزشکی تهران

4,645 citations

Book
09 Mar 1998
TL;DR: This chapter discusses Qualitative Research as Learning as Learning, the role of the researcher as Learner, and major Qualitative research Genres.
Abstract: Chapter 1. Qualitative Research as Learning Chapter 2. The Researcher as Learner Chapter 3. The Researcher as Competent and Ethical Chapter 4. Major Qualitative Research Genres Chapter 5. Conceptualizing and Planning the Research Chapter 6. Entering the Field Chapter 7. Gathering Data in the Field Chapter 8. Our Characters' Data Chapter 9. Issues That Arise in the Field Chapter 10. Analyzing and Interpreting Data Chapter 11. Our Characters' Analyses Chapter 12. Presenting the Learnings

3,699 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1995-BMJ
TL;DR: The aim of this series of papers is to show the value of a range of qualitative techniques and how they can complement quantitative research.
Abstract: Qualitative research methods have a long history in the social sciences and deserve to be an essential component in health and health services research. Qualitative and quantitative approaches to research tend to be portrayed as antithetical; the aim of this series of papers is to show the value of a range of qualitative techniques and how they can complement quantitative research. Medical advances, increasing specialisation, rising patient expectations, and the sheer size and diversity of health service provision mean that today's health professionals work in an increasingly complex arena. The wide range of research questions generated by this complexity has encouraged the search for new ways of conducting research. The rapid expansion of research on and about health and health services, and the relatively recent demarcation of a distinct field of “health services research” depend heavily on doctors and other health professionals being investigators, participants, and peer reviewers. Yet some of the most important questions in health services concern the organisation and culture of those who provide health care, such as why the findings of randomised controlled trials are often difficult to apply in day to day clinical practice. The social science methods appropriate to studying such phenomena are very different from the methods familiar to many health professionals. Although the more qualitative approaches found in certain of the social sciences may seem alien alongside the experimental, quantitative methods used in clinical and biomedical research, they should be an essential component of health services research--not just because they enable us to access areas not amenable to quantitative research, such as lay and professional health beliefs, but also because qualitative description is a prerequisite of good quantitative research, particularly in areas that have received little previous investigation. A good example of this is the study of the social consequences of the …

2,452 citations