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Proceedings ArticleDOI

Fabry-Perot Resonant Cavity Antenna: New Theory and Design Opportunity

09 Mar 2019-Vol. 2019, pp 1-1
TL;DR: In this article, the primary-radiator is used as a superstrate layer in a Fabry-Perot antenna to enhance the high-gain radiating power of the antenna.
Abstract: Fabry-Perot Antenna (FPA) is actually a one-dimensional resonant cavity to serve as a high gain radiator. This may consider as a replacement of large antenna array bearing some new features. Higher directivity is obtained through a uniform phase-front developed within the vertical cavity consists of a ground plane and a superstrate layer. The resonance condition of the cavity is maintained by adjusting its dimension as half of the wavelength of the radiating wave. A ‘primary-radiator’ indeed illuminates the Fabry-Perot cavity. Its high-gain characteristics are determined by this primary-radiator along with the superstrate layer. A grounded radiating aperture, a conventional microstrip patch, or a dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) having a broadside radiation pattern commonly serves as the primary-radiator in an FPA design. Traditionally, the superstrates were physically realized as partially reflecting surfaces (PRSs) such as thin dielectric slab, frequency selective surface (FSS), electromagnetic bandgap structure (EBG), artificial magnetic conductor (AMC), metamaterial, metal grid structure, etc. Their gain-enhancement mechanism used to be demonstrated in terms of reflection coefficients [1] or leaky-wave generation. Their basic concept was leakage of electromagnetic energy through the semi-transparent superstrate.
Citations
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DOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a Fabry-Perot cavity antenna (FPCA) is proposed to achieve wide common impedance and gain bandwidth along with high gain, which is achieved by employing a printed primary radiator and superstrate with superior manufacturing capabilities.
Abstract: An advanced design of a Fabry–Perot cavity antenna (FPCA) is proposed to achieve wide common impedance and gain bandwidth along with high gain. A compact and lightweight FPCA is achieved by employing a printed primary radiator and superstrate with superior manufacturing capabilities. A wideband primary radiator is employed for the first time to realize such a wideband FPCA. Superstrate dimensions are estimated by using the aperture field theory and the proposed design is validated through both EM simulation and experiment. The measured broadside gain is shown to be better than 11.5 dBi over an impedance bandwidth of 63% (8.2−15.6 GHz). About 40% common impedance and gain bandwidth is achieved while the broadside gain attains a maximum value of 17.4 dBi. To the best of our knowledge, this has never been achieved before from an FPCA made of a printed superstrate and a primary radiator. The cross-polar (XP) radiation remains under −40 dB whereas the front-to-back ratio remains above 35 dB, over the desired bandwidth.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a Fabry-Perot cavity antenna (FPCA) is proposed to achieve wide common impedance and gain bandwidth along with high gain, which is achieved by employing a printed primary radiator and superstrate with superior manufacturing capabilities.
Abstract: An advanced design of a Fabry–Perot cavity antenna (FPCA) is proposed to achieve wide common impedance and gain bandwidth along with high gain. A compact and lightweight FPCA is achieved by employing a printed primary radiator and superstrate with superior manufacturing capabilities. A wideband primary radiator is employed for the first time to realize such a wideband FPCA. Superstrate dimensions are estimated by using the aperture field theory and the proposed design is validated through both EM simulation and experiment. The measured broadside gain is shown to be better than 11.5 dBi over an impedance bandwidth of 63% (8.2−15.6 GHz). About 40% common impedance and gain bandwidth is achieved while the broadside gain attains a maximum value of 17.4 dBi. To the best of our knowledge, this has never been achieved before from an FPCA made of a printed superstrate and a primary radiator. The cross-polar (XP) radiation remains under −40 dB whereas the front-to-back ratio remains above 35 dB, over the desired bandwidth.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a resonance cavity antenna (RCA) employing nontransparent solid metal sheet as superstrate is proposed for the first time, and the proposed configuration is much advantageous in terms of design, simplicity, structural stability, fabrication, and cost without compromising in gain, efficiency, and bandwidth.
Abstract: A resonance cavity antenna (RCA) has been explored employing nontransparent solid metal sheet as superstrate which, to the best of our knowledge, is reported for the first time. The proposed configuration is much advantageous in terms of design, simplicity, structural stability, fabrication, and cost without compromising in gain, efficiency, and bandwidth. A probe-fed dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) with ${\boldsymbol{\varepsilon} _r} = {\bf 10}$ has been used as the primary radiator. Proposed RCA bearing overall size ${\bf 1}.{\bf 1}{\boldsymbol{\lambda}} \times {\bf 1}.{\bf 1}{\boldsymbol{\lambda}} \times {\bf 0}.{\bf 6}{\boldsymbol{\lambda}}$ promises for large impedance bandwidth ( ${\sim} {\bf 23}\% $ ) with considerably high gain (11.8–12.2 dBi). The superstrate size is relatively compact compared to its semitransparent versions, investigated earlier. Present design has been experimentally validated indicating as much as 12 dBi peak gain with more than 96.5% efficiency.

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, various resonant cavity antennas (RCAs) having different metal strip gratings (MSGs) as their superstrates are studied in terms of their directivity and scanning properties using transverse equivalent network (TEN) model in conjunction with the periodic method of moments (MoM).
Abstract: Various resonant cavity antennas (RCAs) having different metal strip gratings (MSGs) as their superstrates are studied in terms of their directivity and scanning properties using transverse equivalent network (TEN) model in conjunction with the periodic method of moments (MoM). It is shown that radiation patterns in E- and H-planes coincide over a wide angle range in RCAs when their MSG superstrates are free-standing and highly reflective, as reported in the previous literature. However, using less reflective MSG or employing dielectric support in the MSG superstrate degrades the equality of E- and H-plane radiation patterns. Moreover, as the scan angle increases, radiation patterns in E- and H-planes become noticeably different. It is elucidated that this is due to the angular dependence of the reflection coefficient phase of the MSG superstrates. A comparative study is also performed on a few different RCAs based on both simulation and measurement results. It is illustrated that in practice when the excitation source of the RCA is a probe-fed microstrip antenna and the RCA is finite in size, cross-polarization increases considerably as opposed to the RCAs having ideal sources and, infinite ground plane and MSG superstrate in the transverse direction.

41 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work demonstrates an interesting transformation of a metal superstrate from rectangle to an ellipse or anEllipse-circle combination to achieve significant improvements in the aperture fields and hence the sidelobe level (SLL).
Abstract: An insight based on a new theoretical approach has been developed to facilitate the design of a superstrate which plays a key role in realizing a high gain resonance cavity antenna (RCA). The work is aimed to address a profound theoretical basis of controlling the aperture fields by proper shaping of superstrate and to apply it to alleviate the earlier shortcomings along with further improvement in radiation characteristics. This demonstrates an interesting transformation of a metal superstrate from rectangle to an ellipse or an ellipse-circle combination to achieve significant improvements in the aperture fields and hence the sidelobe level (SLL). The antenna characteristics have been verified using simulated data followed by experiments using different sets of prototypes. About 50% reduction in size along with an improvement in the SLL by 5–17 dB compared to its immediate predecessor has been experimentally demonstrated. Proposed theory should find the potential applications in conceiving efficient RCA designs in the future.

26 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, a new Fabry-Perot cavity antenna (FPCA) has been presented with a unique as well as the most desirable feature of very high gain maintained over its wide matching bandwidth.
Abstract: A new design of Fabry-Perot cavity antenna (FPCA) has been presented with a unique as well as the most desirable feature of very high-gain maintained over its wide matching bandwidth. About 15.5 dBi average broadside-gain has been achieved over the 19% matching bandwidth. A flat-gain characteristic has been attained using a specially designed conical sidewall. In addition to that, the sidewall will play an important role in reducing the mutual coupling arises due to nearby RF elements. About −16 dB and −19 dB side lobe levels have been obtained satisfactorily in two principle-plane patterns (E- and H-plane) respectively. The cross-polarization purity of the antenna is maintained reasonably below −25 dB over the frequency band.

5 citations